Any way to upgrade Dacia II Sandero

This is my first car. Sadly I knew nothing about cars and ended up buying a 1.2 16v version and now I see that it's severely underpowered.

Is there anything I can do to salvage this car and make it a little bit more exciting or should I just wait and buy a better car next time?

I sort of like the idea of upgrading a car that is seen as shit by everyone.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why mangle your daily when you can just get a secondary beater to frick around with?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Why mangle your daily when you can just get a secondary beater to frick around with?

      Because Hitler didn't kill 6 million israelites and as a result they are bleeding us dry with their filthy israelite schemes like having to pay a huge sum for registration and all the technical inspections.

      I bought this car mostly because I save hundreds of € on registration alone. Registering another car will cost me 500€ or more + several hundred in mandatory insurance.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Eurocuck problems

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Redline it and it's adequate. Not fast but you'll keep up with traffic.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You got a 2nd hand Phase II Sandero? That particular engine is... unremarkable, but serviceable.
      As anon here said, you need to rev it pretty high to get some oomph out of it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >You got a 2nd hand Phase II Sandero? That particular engine is... unremarkable, but serviceable.

        I did. I got it for cheap. What can I do to upgrade my car?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Frankly, a pair of good driving shoes. Many people simply don't get how important footwear is for proper control.
          A Sandero is a cheap runabout, don't dump cash into it (outside of regular maintenance, that is). Maybe get some cheap QoL stuff like those small round stick-on fisheye mirrors for blindspots, and/or rubber bumpers/liners for your door edges.
          Put some money each month into a (metaphorical) piggybank for the next ride.

  3. 1 month ago
    Gears

    Probably best to keep this one a conservative daily and save up for something more fun in due time.
    It's surely possible to make it faster but doing that in a way that's beginner-friendly, legal, still somewhat reliable and reasonably economical and actually effective is going to be prohibitively expensive.
    Plus turning your daily driver into a project-car is generally a questionable idea, more so if it's your first.
    Maybe give it a better stereo or speakers if that's bothering, or better tires when the current ones are done.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Best upgrades for a cheap car.

    1) Tires (this applies to ANY car)

    Tires will both improve the handling and assist in keeping you safe in bad weather. Use tires suitable for your climate, any big name brand like Michelin or Goodyear or Falken will do a fine job.

    2) Exhaust. You can free up a little power cheaply by getting rid of the muffler and centre resonator. Decat helps too but may cause the engine to run lean if the ECU isn’t recoded to accommodate.

    3) Cylinder head - gas flow and port/polish. This is the most expensive thing you can do. It’ll cost hundreds of dollars. But it will net the biggest power gains.

    But ultimately it’s a cheap reliable car. You can rag it all day and it’ll take it like a champ. be kind to the clutch and flywheel by giving it a moment to settle after pulling away before flooring it and wait a good ten minutes before driving fast and it’ll be fine.

    You should consider watching videos on racing and drifting, made by professionals. It’ll help you a lot and if you make a mistake it’ll be cheaper to fix a Dacia than a BMW. Plus it’ll be a forgiving car anyway.

    If there’s any advanced driving type schools in the area or track day instructors it’s worth getting further tuition if you can afford it.

    Premium fuel may help with low end torque as well. It’s not going to make it a race car but it should be a little less sluggish when driving normally.

    Hope this helps

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >1) Tires (this applies to ANY car)

      What about lightweight alloy wheels? Do they do anything?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Truly lightweight alloys will probably cost more than you paid for the car €4000 isn’t unreasonable for a quality set. Most aftermarket wheels are cheap and worse quality than what’s on there already so you may damage them on a pothole more easily. Like I said your best bet is to learn to drive the car faster. The fact you know very little about cars makes me think tinkering with it could leave you out of pocket or worse. The stuff I recommended will make the car much better to drive. It’ll never be really fast but it will wake it up quite a bit. A 10 hp gain may not sound much but if it’s only got ~75 hp now. Even a 5 hp increase will make it feel a lot better.

        You’ll get hate over a straight pipe but it’s a very cheap and low risk job. You might have a laugh driving it too. You’ll feel like you’re going faster than you are, but then again you may object to sounding like a boy racer.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Motoring in Europe is outrageously expensive. If the only gripe about the car is the power it’s not that difficult to improve. It’s just money but at that point you’ll probably find it easier and cheaper to trade it in for something faster.

          In all honesty you’ve got a great car and if you can squeeze a little more power out of it you should have some fun. Once you get to around 90 hp in a small car you’ll have no trouble getting up hills or joining the highway. That’s only a 15 hp increase you need which is definitely achievable with some cylinder head work and an exhaust with a remap to optimise things. But again do you really want to spend €1000 making it faster? This isn’t a diesel where a €500 tune will get you another 30% more power.

          Plus you may have issues with your insurance company if you tamper with it. Just something to be aware of

  5. 1 month ago
    Gears

    Be aware that straight-piping is illegal in many countries. You may be able to getter a better exhaust, but straight-up deleting the muffler will make you fail inspection and since it's easy to hear you're not unlikely to end up having cops banish your car onto a trailer until it's proven to no longer be too loud (with a fat fine in addition). At least in germany they'll stop you and have it towed right away.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is true. It depends on where the guy lives and if he is friends with the people who perform the inspection. I would be very surprised if freeing up the exhaust would cost him much money even done in a legal manner, hence why I suggested it. The poor guy probably doesn’t have much money and just wants to get on the highway without feeling like he’s going to cause a pile up

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >The poor guy probably doesn’t have much money and just wants to get on the highway without feeling like he’s going to cause a pile up

        I have 1400€ and I am getting paid tomorrow. I don't have much money because I was a hikikomori for many years. I will soon be a 30 year old virgin

        • 1 month ago
          Gears

          >I have 1400€ and I am getting paid tomorrow.
          Better get a decent emergency-fund going before messing with your car. You don't wanna run into a major bill and be in trouble.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Well don’t blow all your money on making a cheap car fast. Look into improving the engine’s ability to breathe (exhaust and cylinder head) as that’s where the main restrictions are. It’s a 75 hp engine from the factory. It’s probably got a clogged fuel system from being run on cheap fuel. A can of injector cleaner and some V-power could go a long way. I know nothing about you or what your circumstances are. What are you really looking to achieve? It’s not really built for the 100+ kmh sort of speeds. I have only ever owned fast cars. I spent some time in a 1200cc and it was pretty bad if I’m honest. But it was able to get up to reasonable speeds if revved up to like 5500 rpm. Don’t be afraid to press the pedal, it’s not gonna blow your engine. As long as you’re up to temperature and keep on top of maintenance you can do flat out every day and it’ll be fine.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >What are you really looking to achieve? It’s not really built for the 100+ kmh sort of speeds

            To make the car 5-10% faster so I can switch lanes easier by overtaking people

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Ok here’s what you need to do. Buy a can of injector cleaner and follow the instructions. Replace the fuel filter. Run the car on V-Power or similar. It’ll get a bit more low end torque. If that doesn’t make a huge difference look into a panel filter on the air intake for a little more response. If you still need more power, get a high flow exhaust system. I doubt you’ll want to spend much more in terms of performance parts. If you can get away with straight piping the factory system, do it. It’ll probably cost you peanuts and is low risk in terms of mechanical issues. A high performance gas flowed cylinder head will cost you maybe €600, I don’t know for sure. Make some enquiries. This alone will probably add about 15% more power depending on how good the factory casting quality on the cylinder head is. You can get the ECU remapped to optimise everything but there’s not much gains to be had from this until you start messing around with camshafts and the like (not something you’ll ever bother with on a car like a sandero). All in all it’s not hopeless at all. I seriously recommend better tires though. Best thing I ever did to any of my cars

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I forgot to mention that even if you upgrade the cylinder head by getting it polished up, you’re still going to have to rev it really hard to get anywhere. It’s the nature of the engine’s design, because the improvements by design are most effective when the engine is trying to shift large amounts of fuel and exhaust gases. But when the power does come in, it’ll be a lot better. Dropping a cog or delaying your up shifts in busy traffic can help enormously. People shift up to save fuel/noise/perceived engine wear but don’t realise that they’ll end up needing to slow down again a few seconds later. Then they go to accelerate and realise the car has no power due to lower revs. If you learn how to rev match (check on google or YouTube) you can smoothly go up and down the gears without any nasty jerks or delays, which in turn makes the car a lot more responsive and ready to go. I have done this for a long time and it allows me to switch between fuel saving higher gears and rapid throttle response on the fly. Very useful

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Thanks for everything. I saved all your tips in a text file and will research them on my own

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            No problem I hope it works out. Start from the bottom and work your way up the list in terms of expense. Do the cheap basics first. It’s a cheap car and Dacia made millions of them so it could probably do with a little TLC hence why I mentioned the fuel lines being dirty. It’ll never be a rocket outside of expensive turbo or supercharger kits but it should have enough power for normal driving. You probably don’t realise it now but the Sandero is a better car than it’s given credit for. It’s low complexity by modern standards which means better reliability and cheap to repair. Sure it’s a slow plodder but it won’t let you down.

            I forgot to ask if you learnt to drive in a diesel. Gasoline engines require a lot more rpm to get going whether you are in a hurry or not. I have only ever had reasonably fast cars at minimum but I have driven a 1.2 and it had to be pushed to 5k to make decent progress outside of the city limits. It did go well enough if required but if you were the type to think the engine would lose half its life span by being revved, you’d feel like you’d get passed by buses. That’s just how it is with small cheap cars, unfortunately.

            If it helps I can tell you I most certainly have seen Dacias making good progress in traffic so it is possible. If you had a turbo a basic remap would fix your problems but I don’t think you do, so the options are a bit more awkward

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The engine is the ubiquitous Renault D4F, they did actually make a turbo version that should be a drop-in upgrade (if you can get all the electronics to work). With a bit of luck you can find them for under €500 including the turbo itself.
            But if OP could get his hands on a factory 1.6 Sandero instead, that'd be a much better starting point. 105hp with potential up to 140hp if you build it up to Twingo RS spec.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            CANbus will say no. You’d need to swap everything over and it’s a massive job. You’d effectively be buying a second car to carry out the conversion.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Depends on if you can flash the turbo tune on the original ECU and make the wiring harness work, or if you can pair the turbo ECU to the body control module and key.
            Or maybe every module is coded to the ECU now and would need to be paired using dealership tools. I don't know enough about the Sandero specifically to say anything with 100% certainty on that front.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >I have only ever had reasonably fast cars at minimum but I have driven a 1.2 and it had to be pushed to 5k to make decent progress outside of the city limits. It did go well enough if required but if you were the type to think the engine would lose half its life span by being revved, you’d feel like you’d get passed by buses.
            Those new-ish VW 1.0 TSI engines can pull pretty hard at surprisingly low revs (1500 or so), but the performance depends so much on the turbo that it's kind of uneven and not the most fun thing to drive. Drove a rented MT Polo for a bit last summer. Accelerating one smoothly from a stop was took a bit of practice, especially when switching from the 1st to the second gear. Could almost drive it like a small diesel otherwise.
            I don't think that turbocharger has a very long lifespan, though.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            They definitely can get the job done but they are all built to a price rather than a standard. Those engines will not last nearly as long as a normally aspirated 1.4 or 1.6. They don’t increase the quality of the components to cope with the higher levels of torque etc. also the OP seemingly doesn’t have a turbocharged engine so he’s stuck with much more awkward choices like trading a quiet exhaust for more power

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yup, feels like they were very carefully optimized for a balance of cost, emissions, performance and durability, and some durability was sacrificed in the process.
            OP's car might actually outlast one of those, if reasonably well maintained.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Engine failure is much more common than it used to be and it’s 100% the result of emissions legislation and manufacturers trying even harder to keep costs down to compensate. Let’s say a DPF is a €1500 replacement. You had to pay that when you bought the car brand new. Hence that one component put that price up by €1200+. And the EU has legislated loads of other similar things plus assists that nobody asked for. As prices go up Dacia will sell even more cars due to the common motorist being unable to afford anything else.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            just downshift moron

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Find a crashed Clio 2 RS, Twingo 2 RS or Twingo 2 GT and swap over the drivetrain.
    Good luck getting it back to street legal though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      At least in some countries, you can make pretty silly modded cars street legal without too much trouble, but it's going to need a special modified vehicle inspection if the driving, safety or emissions characteristics have changed too much. And that's probably going to affect the insurance costs quite a bit.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's exactly what I'd run into if I were to D4FT swap my Twingo. Going above a 20% power increase you need to get it re-registered and re-insured, and that means passing a €1000 special inspection assuming you did everything right the first time.
        Older cars can get by with a less stringent (and less expensive) inspection.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Don't do it anon. I fell for the fast cheap car meme and got myself a money pit Merc. Should've kept my shitty Suzuki Liana.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >severely underpowered
    it's absolutely not, it's completely fine.

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