Are there any straight-six diesel truck engines of at least 350hp that had a particularly long stretch of serial production?

Are there any straight-six diesel truck engines of at least 350hp that had a particularly long stretch of serial production? I'm doing some napkin design.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Bepis

    Detroit Series 60 engines were in a billion trucks for a long time.

    Smaller engines, the Navistar- International DT466 was a fuggin workhorse for medium duty trucks for a couple decades. I think they changed the ignition or fuel injection and added a bunch of emissions stuff later, but I believe the block pretty much was the same

    • 2 months ago
      Bepis

      The Series 60 was 1987-2011 according to Wiki. Picrel is the Navistar DT466.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        What's the design lineage on the DT? Is it derived from an older block, or is it totally new circa 1971?

        • 2 months ago
          Bepis

          Google that b***h and see. Wiki doesn’t have a “predecessor” so there’s a good chance if was a clean sheet design, especially because 1971 might have been when the 2-strokes were dying off. The DT466 is probably the most common one, but they had a few different displacements. AFAIK, the DT466 was pretty much the same through most of its life aside from changes to the fuel pumps and injection systems and the emissions stuff added in the mid-00s.

          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Navistar_DT_engine

          There’s probably a bunch more info out there besides Wiki because those engines weren’t just used in road-going trucks. Same with lots of Catepillar engines and Detroit Diesel.

          Didn’t look into Cummins too much yet.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Jewgle can only get me so far

            >diesel
            >>>/n/

            Not an /n/ application, a /k/ application if anything

            Cummins N14

            In the heavy duty sphere you have engines like the cat 3406 line including A/B/C/E variants. Cummins small cam and big cam motors that eventually grew into the N14s, Detroit has the series 60 etc.
            For medium duty you have the B & C series Cummins. International has the DT466. I’m sure you can find plenty more but that’s off the top of my head

            https://i.imgur.com/YNabPXQ.png

            Cummins B series 6-cylinder variants were pretty common since 1984 and still in production. They're not exactly high output engines from the factory, but they're easy as hell to tune past 350hp with some simple mods. Some high output engines existed for heavy industrial uses like School Buses or delivery trucks, and some dually truggs like the 5.9L ISB.making 325hp factory, or the 6.7L ISB making 350hp.

            All the DT466's are mine. Back the frick off.

            What's the lowdown on the merits of these versus one another? Any that should be avoided for reliability reasons?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            They all basically do the same thing. If you're looking for something that will make 350hp minimum and will last forever then the biggest engine is best, which I think would be a cummins K19 or a K23 if you're looking for a genset (the K23 prefers constant engine speed). There's also the Perkins 2806 which is pretty similar.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Would something which prefers constant engine speed be the best fit for a hydrostatic transmission, or is it not worth worrying about?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            My friend has a dual range hydrostatic tractor. You can set rpms from 1500 to 3500 depending on how hard you're working it

          • 2 months ago
            Beppu

            The DT466 is the medium duty engine that won’t fricking die. When you see old 90s box trucks on the road, look for the little “DT466” on the 90s and even 00s, those things get abused and abused by company drivers for decades. It’s a love-hate relationship because at a certain point your spine hurts and your sweaty from ancient suspension and no AC, but the companies won’t replace the trucks because the engines are still running strong even though you don’t know what the true mileage is because they have replaced the instrument cluster and dash for other reasons at least 3 times.

            The medium duty Cats and Cummins are smooth and good, but by 300k most of them are retired because the turbo blew (again) or it was leaking so much oil that they didn’t want to do another rebuild and the driver ran the thing dry and seized it up.

            The mid-late 00s Internationals were shitty because all the emissions stuff was horrible, but the engines themselves never really have issues,

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Probably new. IH came onto the diesel scene, VERY late in the game. Even in the early '60s, instead of going diesel, they modded the 345 gas cylinder thickness and pushed the 392 gasser as a large truck engine and later went to the MV404. When the company finally wound down their light-duty division, in '80, they didn't even have a small diesel to put in the Scout - they had to source a Nissan TD.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Watch Deboss Garage's "everything wrong with" series on the various diesel engines. He put a CAT 3126 in his F350 which seems kinda legit aside from the HEUI bullshit.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cummins B series 6-cylinder variants were pretty common since 1984 and still in production. They're not exactly high output engines from the factory, but they're easy as hell to tune past 350hp with some simple mods. Some high output engines existed for heavy industrial uses like School Buses or delivery trucks, and some dually truggs like the 5.9L ISB.making 325hp factory, or the 6.7L ISB making 350hp.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They have marine 6BT's making 370 stock

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Pretty rare to see them making 350hp in anything that does real work, 280 is about the max I see for the 6.7 litre. Even it's big brother the ISL (continued on from the C series, also a very old motor) are typically only 350ish hp in a truck/bus configuration.

      Marine being an obvious exception, you can make a lot more horsepower when you have literally an entire ocean to cool it with.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I run about 300-350 guessing on power as I’ve never dynod the older motors and I’m pretty sure the 6.7 I have is tuned around 400. They do good work pulling trailers with decent loads on them all the time.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I'd be really surprised if they were. Peak power really isn't the aim of the game with these

          OP, the Rolls Royce diesels were in production until the 1980s. HP figures are inaccurate and confusing as they were also used as stationary engines, marine engines, in small locomotives and for some other weird stuff like mining equipment. They also made them as inline fours and eights. And the British measured horsepower differently in industrial applications across the production run. Still, they ran in wheeled vehicles at about 250-300. They're also brilliant engines to work on if you have any interest in that.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I mean stock 6.7s in pickups are now 400+ not that hard to get them up to that level if you delete and throw more fuel/turbo at it.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Pickemups don't do real work

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Why wouldn’t they? I feel pretty comfortable with up to 15 tons behind it for most of their lives.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            That isn't what's being discussed here. The stock figures are all that matters for heavy and industrial applications. At no point is more power required by the operators. If they required more power they'd go to the manufacturer and ask for it. They're not pursuing power here. There are 50 year old rigs with engines making barely 200hp that are pulling 100+ ton daily with ease. Those pickups aren't doing that with 4000 horsepower, 400 or 40.

            I feel the whole point of this is lost on people. For these sort of rigs, peak power has absolutely nothing to do with the overall game. The gearing, frame, brakes, transmission and engine strength are all important things. Engine power is about as relevant as a good paint job - nice to have but not remotely necessary

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The OP is asking for long lived series of engines that can make around 350hp. Cummins B series motors are now 400 hp stock. Older ones were obviously lower but easily remedied with some very slight modifications. I am not doubting anything about frame capacity, gearing, brakes, transmission, etc. engine power is very nice to have in smaller vehicles where you can’t rely on gearing to save you.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The OP is asking for long lived series of engines that can make around 350hp. Cummins B series motors are now 400 hp stock. Older ones were obviously lower but easily remedied with some very slight modifications. I am not doubting anything about frame capacity, gearing, brakes, transmission, etc. engine power is very nice to have in smaller vehicles where you can’t rely on gearing to save you.

            The application is a tracked machine of maybe 10-15 tons, hydrostatic transmission. Power would be nice to keep it rolling over rough terrain once it's accelerated.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I'm talking about OE horsepower ratings in heavy duty applications, not some redneck and his hooptie that might tow a mini excavator on a trailer 4 times a year

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            See

            The OP is asking for long lived series of engines that can make around 350hp. Cummins B series motors are now 400 hp stock. Older ones were obviously lower but easily remedied with some very slight modifications. I am not doubting anything about frame capacity, gearing, brakes, transmission, etc. engine power is very nice to have in smaller vehicles where you can’t rely on gearing to save you.

            also good thing I’m def not using one of muh truggs more than 4 times a year

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >
        Marine being an obvious exception, you can make a lot more horsepower when you have literally an entire ocean to cool it with.
        How's the rust on high flow ocean water cooled engines?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >How's the rust on high flow ocean water cooled engines?

          The sea water runs through a heat exchanger that cools the engine coolant.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Marine being an obvious exception, you can make a lot more horsepower when you have literally an entire ocean to cool it with.

        Still. If you take a 370 and run it full tilt at 3,000 rpm it won't last too long. At 2800 rpm you are looking at 1800 hours between rebuilds and at 2400 rpm you are looking at 3,000 hours between rebuilds. All the above is assuming it is propped to 3,000 rpm at full

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    In the heavy duty sphere you have engines like the Cat 3406 line including A/B/C/E variants. Cummins small cam and big cam motors that eventually grew into the N14s, Detroit has the series 60 etc.
    For medium duty you have the B & C series Cummins. International has the DT466. I’m sure you can find plenty more but that’s off the top of my head

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    All the DT466's are mine. Back the frick off.

    • 2 months ago
      Bepis

      Take them. Frick those engines, so many dudes wish their DT466 engines would die so they can finally get a truck built in this millennium with functioning AC.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        if your car/truck/vehicle has AC you are a troony
        if you ever use heat for anything but defog/defrost you are a woman

        the israelite fears the white man who fearlessly braves all temperatures

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >diesel
    >>>/n/

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cummins N14

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cat C15?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Scania has had I6s over that for ages, some are well into the 500s too. Not sure if they were ever in a truck in the US but they sell them for marine and industrial stuff so they're not too rare.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Girls engine that is.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The 3406 is probably the best choice, those things will do 1 million miles with regular servicing.

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