Better consistency in cornersrs

Drivers of DA who go on spirited drives, how do you become more consistent in a corner more specifically hairpins. I struggle really hard with them mostly on entry I can never get the proper braking zone and always feel like I’m understeering on entry, I drive a 2013 wrx with mods making 280hp and on summer tyres. Any other tips for consistency and better drive technique for anything then hairpins is also welcomed thank you!

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you're braking too late.
    consider grip as a pie chart.
    accelerating, braking and turning take large pieces of the pie, and when your pie runs out you have lost traction. So you want to slow down a bit earlier and do things a bit more methodically.
    one thing to remember is that if you feel like you're physically having to try hard to drive fast you're doing it wrong. smooth and calm is fast.
    slow, careful corner entry makes for a fast precise exit.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The grip as a pie chart is actually really smart I’ve never thought of it like that. I’m gonna try and remember that. How would you go about gauging a braking zone better? I feel I’m always relying on abs when entering a hairpin

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        brake a bit earlier, slow down more, and accelerate through the apex instead of trying to brake up to the apex like you would on a track.

        I want to say use your brakes less and apply them more softly but do it decisively and sooner. your abs shouldn't be actuating, that means you're braking too late and starting to turn and that's eating too much of the grip pie, which means your turn in will be slower generally.
        consider the pie analogy, you have to give the car a little more time to stabilize under deceleration and recover grip (baking more pie, as it were) before you turn in, or else the forward weight transfer will eat the rest of that pie especially with AWD and FWD where the front end does a lot of work.

        This - divide and conquer:
        >brake to entry speed
        then
        >turn
        then
        >gas it past apex while you get the car back into a straight trajectory

        One good exercise is to run your circuit one time without breaking at all, just managing the speeds with gear changes and throttle control. Time yourself and start form there.

        That will eliminate the brake work for the first pass so you can focus on the entry speeds.

        this anon is on the money too
        try driving your route at a reasonable speed without braking at all and gradually step it up until you feel the need to use the brakes.
        you want to learn how to conserve your momentum. braking late and hard, turning sharply and accelerating again might be fun and feel fast but you're actually just wasting kinetic energy.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You're wrong about a few things here. One, braking harder and later is better because you get to the entrance of the corner faster. You seem to be implying that acceleration felt by the driver is a sign of being slow when that's the opposite of the truth. Conserving momentum is NOT what you're trying to do around a turn. Turning is a form of acceleration, and your change in direction comes from the force of the tires against the ground. You're not trying to conserve the portion of momentum that's going in the wrong direction, you're trying to get rid of it as fast as possible and replace it with momentum going in a different direction. The fastest possible turn will result in the driver feeling the most acceleration on his body. Second, you should be easing off the brakes through the turn and only be completely off the brakes by the middle of the turn. Your pie chart analogy is wrong because the size of the whole pie actually grows and shrinks per-wheel based on how much weight is on each wheel. As you're braking the weight of the car is shifted forward which gives the front wheels more total grip to play with. This is called trail braking.

          I would describe the fastest turn as braking late and hard, starting with maximum application but coming off the brakes gradually, timed so that you're off the brakes completely by 1/2 or 1/3 of the way into the turn, and started as late as possible, which is something you'll have to practice to find the latest you can brake to still have enough grip for the turn.

          That being said, this is really not something you should be practicing on the street.

          The advice to practice the course without brakes is useful but that's only because so many people brake way too much and don't realize how fast they can be turning. If you make them practice without brakes going faster and faster it makes them realize the limit of grip is much higher than they expected.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >braking harder and later is better because you get to the corner faster

            certified moron

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This - divide and conquer:
      >brake to entry speed
      then
      >turn
      then
      >gas it past apex while you get the car back into a straight trajectory

      One good exercise is to run your circuit one time without breaking at all, just managing the speeds with gear changes and throttle control. Time yourself and start form there.

      That will eliminate the brake work for the first pass so you can focus on the entry speeds.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Practice, practice, practice.
    Don't overthink this like it's a flowchart, just gain a feel for your car and how it reacts to inputs.
    As a fellow Subaru guy, you've got to get used to understeer. With an STi you can to the flick thing and time the turbo ramp-up just right and oversteer into corners. IDK what kind of diffs your WRX has. It's not as easy as a miata where you just mash the throttle going into a corner.
    Just build up higher and higher speeds in the same corners over months and get a feel for when you're going to break traction and how. Consider weight transfer and how that effects traction and balance - you want very smooth inputs for a fast grip run

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The understeer kills me I feel like it’s gonna be the death of me some nights. Unironicly thinking about getting a Miata and selling the subi so it’s interesting you mention the mx5 lol

      You're wrong about a few things here. One, braking harder and later is better because you get to the entrance of the corner faster. You seem to be implying that acceleration felt by the driver is a sign of being slow when that's the opposite of the truth. Conserving momentum is NOT what you're trying to do around a turn. Turning is a form of acceleration, and your change in direction comes from the force of the tires against the ground. You're not trying to conserve the portion of momentum that's going in the wrong direction, you're trying to get rid of it as fast as possible and replace it with momentum going in a different direction. The fastest possible turn will result in the driver feeling the most acceleration on his body. Second, you should be easing off the brakes through the turn and only be completely off the brakes by the middle of the turn. Your pie chart analogy is wrong because the size of the whole pie actually grows and shrinks per-wheel based on how much weight is on each wheel. As you're braking the weight of the car is shifted forward which gives the front wheels more total grip to play with. This is called trail braking.

      I would describe the fastest turn as braking late and hard, starting with maximum application but coming off the brakes gradually, timed so that you're off the brakes completely by 1/2 or 1/3 of the way into the turn, and started as late as possible, which is something you'll have to practice to find the latest you can brake to still have enough grip for the turn.

      That being said, this is really not something you should be practicing on the street.

      The advice to practice the course without brakes is useful but that's only because so many people brake way too much and don't realize how fast they can be turning. If you make them practice without brakes going faster and faster it makes them realize the limit of grip is much higher than they expected.

      Trail braking sounds above my skill limit I’m still learning the basics of “going fast” idk what to call it without sound like a sped street racer, but I understand the concept with how you said it. I’m going to the mountains tonight, I only go between 1am-4am when I know nobody is gonna be in the valley. Im going to do my first run without breaking and try and understand my cars amount of grip in low speed corners. High speeds are easy unless the tighten then I’m sitting in the same boat as a hairpin

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Buy a wheel and a pedal and play Assetto Corsa on your PC. It's not above your skill limit, it's actually pretty easy, it's just better not to practice on a public road.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Already do that have for years, I feel like I can’t improve anymore from sim racing I need actual seat time to be a better driver

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          the one thing to remember about AC and most sims is that it's not entirely like driving irl, you have a lot LESS grip than in real life and the grip is very peaky because it doesn't take into account the quantum mechanical effects.
          I consider driving in the dry in ac to be similar to driving irl in heavy rain on bald tires.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Real

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Is this a meme?

            https://i.imgur.com/q5RZyOb.jpg

            >braking harder and later is better because you get to the corner faster

            certified moron

            You can Google it bud

            Already do that have for years, I feel like I can’t improve anymore from sim racing I need actual seat time to be a better driver

            If you're not trail braking in the sim then you're not doing it right to begin with

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I honestly don’t in sim racing because I don’t get it. My goal is just to get lap times down and I’ve managed to consistently get them down by like a tenth or a thousandth and never trail brake. I’m just hard locked into not learning it I guess since I’m still beating times, I want to learn trail braking now

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Do learn. If you're OP it will help your understeer problem. Help you get the car rotating in addition to steering input

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Not OP here. There's a LOT you can learn from sim racing and even GTA.
            But IRL there are feelings and sensations that can't be replicated in a sim. You have to just have a feeling that understeer is imminent or instinctual knowledge that a weight shift here can lead to oversteer.
            I've always lived in very rural ares, like you don't see a single car in 30 minutes at night, so maybe I don't feel street hooning is as dangerous as others do.
            I found corners or intersections (some on my daily commute) with no curb or obstacles and spun-out many many times but never hit anything. You can't learn if you don't fail, but you have to know to fail somewhere safe. Learning in a sim or on a track doesn't cut it for the average dude. It helps with the basics of cornering and spacial awareness of a vehicle, but it doesn't prepare you for the physical and mental realities of driving hard IRL.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            op is not on a track and is hooning a normal road car on street tires
            a bit of caution goes a long way and running up to the very edge of your traction circle on a public road is absolute moron shit. youl have a nice day driving like that idiot

            also sims get suspension stuff right but most tire models are way off. modern science does not fully understand the way a tire interacts with pavement. it has been theorized that the process of a tire slipping, it's surface boiling and turning to vapor from the heat of friction, but still somehow able to grip the pavement despite literally riding on a cloud of vaporized rubber, operates on quantum mechanics and therefore cannot be accurately simulated with the standard mathematical model of physics.
            tl;dr all sims are wrong but it's ok because we don't even have the computing power to make them perfectly accurate

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Do you have a source where I can read about this more

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            real 2

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            https://www.instagram.com/reel/C0XJMDFABTm/?igsh=YWttcWF6cGtzbGJ0

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            maybe he should learn to drive then

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            he can't do that very well if he's dead in a tree moron
            even rally pros never drive at 10/10ths of their ability

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >op is not on a track and is hooning a normal road car on street tires
            >a bit of caution goes a long way and running up to the very edge of your traction circle on a public road is absolute moron shit. youl have a nice day driving like that idiot

            Yeah, I already said this disclaimer. He's explicitly asking for advice on how to drive closer to the limit on the street though.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Black person that's not what quantum means.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You need some endurance racing under your belt to understand. Braking hard at the last second is the same as lighter earlier braking and the same as coast brake. So long as entry speeds and braking end point are the same, that's the important part.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >So long as entry speeds and braking end point are the same, that's the important part.
            Of course. Then consider what happens if you get to the turn earlier to begin with. You do the whole thing earlier. Hence braking hard at the last second is faster.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You're confusing the overall lap time with the specific section of the turn. Which can remain consistent using all braking styles I mentioned if you're good enough. Will fall off if you're really trying to save fuel to push a pit stop back though

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm not "confusing" the overall lap time with the specific section, I'm just talking about overall lap time, like on purpose.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >and always feel like I’m understeering on entry
    you can oversteer anything on entry with the brake pedal

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