Brainlet question: is weight a pro or con for off-road vehicles?

Brainlet question: is weight a pro or con for off-road vehicles?

Being heavier means more groud pressure, thus more friction and grip.
But it also means that the car will sink more into soft material like snow or mud.

So how does it end up working out in real life?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you be the judge

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Lesbarus, we won!

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Power to weight ratio is important, but generally lighter is better.

    If you're off-roading on sand or snow you want as light as possible with big tires and not too much tire pressure.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    it's easier to add weight to a vehicle

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    weight only matters as a black or white qualifier. A hummer EV is a good offroad vehicle but it also weighs 9,000 lbs. Therefore it will be outclassed by almost anything that weighs less than it, like basically any jeep or raptor/TRX. in loose deformable surfaces lighter is better. and if you have natural sympathy, lighter trucks or SUVs do less damage to trails or the environment.
    more important than weight imo is wheelbase. short wheelbases allow you to conquer some crazy shit with effectively more ground clearance but at the cost of vehicle stability. seen at least two people roll 2 door jeeps in situations where a 4 door tackled it just fine.
    application also matters more than weight. the raptor and TRX are designed as baja trucks for higher speed offroading. they will destroy any jeep in that application. but the jeep will win on technical trails and rock crawling.

    the question you have to ask yourself to determine your need:
    > where am i trying to go with it?
    arizona sand is much different than mississippi mud, which is much different than utah rock, which is different than maine gravel. ideally you’d tailor your vehicle to the terrain you're going to conquer

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Big and heavy for high speed desert runs, small & light for tight trails.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    All you need to know is that stopping often means getting stuck. Do a free body diagram if you need to. Hint: heavy cars sink.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I just finished an overlanding trip through northwestern Africa with a bunch of other people. It seems to me that the ones who were breaking springs, overheating, and experiencing the most problems were the ones with big and heavy cars. Anecdotally, newer (post ~2000) Toyotas (Land Cruiser, Prado, HiLux) seemed particularly bad about this. Lighter cars like Suzuki SJ, Honda CRV, etc., were mostly problem free. My Twingo ran fine the whole way (~9000 km), and it was really easy to push out when I got stuck in deep sand.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      if only there was awd twingo...

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, for next time, I want something with better traction in sand and just a little bit more ground clearance. I'm thinking Fiat Panda 4x4, but maybe with a good LSD and the right tires a Twingo could still work.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Swiss postal services have used these for decades, they regularly get rid of them and sell them all over europe. Few years back when I sold my Panda 4x4 I saw several dealers in germany that must have recieved batches of 20-50 cars.
          They're banged up and only come with a driver's seat, but was the cheapest way to get a Panda 4x4, the rear is already stripped out and there is a proper divider, sometimes a roof rack too.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Was doing some clear cutting in an area that was quite mucky. A 4CX backhoe got stuck, a Komatsu 20 ton got stuck just traveling on flat ground to go help the 4CX.

    We basically from then on did everything by chain saw and used a ram 1500 as a log wagon but kept the Suzuki Vitara nearby to help recover it 10+ times a day.

    Another time we went down into a valley that was quite soppy with a defender 90 on fresh AT's and my Pajero IO with mix and match street tires down to the wear markers. My IO walked passed areas where the defender was struggling multiple times.

    I would say if you are going through fresh undisturbed trails. Lighter is always better and it disturbs the trail a lot less allowing more passes before problems. You run through there with one piece of heavy equipment one time and it's all fricked immediately.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Weight is huge huge con in my experience.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I knew quite a few military guys, who did their time in certain sand-filled shitholes. They were not at all impressed with the H1. "Underpowered" was an obvious complaint, but the guys that knew more about driving invariably said "weight" and sinking into soft sand. I can tell you a new, stripper-model HMV weighs 5200lbs, an up-armored one weighs 7200lbs and I think the comms/ambulance models were fricking 11,500-12,500lbs.

    • 2 months ago
      s10fag

      and some genius engineer decided to swap out the th400 for a 4l60

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Weight doesn't matter as much as momentum. If you hit a nasty section of mud at 40mph in a 20k lb truck you're probably going to make it through. If you try and crawl through that section in a 2000lb side by side you're probably going to get stuck.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Weight is a con in every circumstance.

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