Buying salvaged titles that have been fixed

How moronic is this? My boomer dad is obsessed with trying to get me to buy shit like this because it's usually over 50% off. Pic related has been fixed to look brand new and has 10,000 miles, and is going for $18k. I however think this is fricking stupid and a liability. Anyone with experience?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >18k for scrap metal
    Your dad is definitely a boomer.
    Fixing crashed cars is something you do when you are a tow truck company or mechanic getting salvage cars dumped on you for free constantly. If you aren't already a mechanic with a shop you are going to take that $18k wreck to a shop for $10k+ worth of work just for it to still be a wrecked car with bandaids all over.
    Get a car that just needs a sensor or two and maybe a set of tires.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Its not really a liability unless its you and jethro repairing it while drunk. Theres nothing really mission critical back there likely to be damaged unless the frame is tweaked (hidden) or the rear suspension is affected. Minor tweaks can be corrected, but you don't have that equipment and will be paying someone several thousand to un-tweek it. That should be your "major" concern. Considering that "floor pan" of the trunk is crumpled, someone's going to have to un-tweak that if that entire assembly can't just be replaced. Meaning you're beating it on it for hours with a 3lb maul hoping it doesn't look like shit.

      The other stuff almost anybody can do: look up the price for a new trunk, quarter panels, bumper, bumper inserts, lights, and anything else that looks like it might be dented. Assuming all minor bits are there like parking sensors, thats all labor (and how body shops make their money) to detach and reset all those little sensors, emblems, foam, wiring harnesses, etc. You've got 2 avenues: buy new and have them painted with the rest of the car. Or buy junkyard parts in the same color and hope it all reasonably matches. Most of that shit is all bolt-on, some might be glued on from the factory and you have to just know how to remove them before breaking whatever part its attached to.

      If you've never done that kind of work before its daunting and you'll be doing it all by dead reckoning. I'm sure theres a youtube channel showing the gist of how its all done but in reality they cannot account for your vehicles specific damages, but its all the same process.

      Like I said in the OP, it's already been fixed.
      https://www.brokersandsellers.com/vdp/20921815/Used-2020-Lincoln-MKZ-for-sale-in-Detroit-MI

      I just don't trust the average mechanic is going to do all the "tweaking" you mentioned, rather fixing it up just to the point that it can be sold and taken off a lot. Even if it comes with a warranty, I don't believe it's safe if I get in 'another' crash (heaven forbid.) I dunno, if it was just matter of "tweaks" and a new trunk and back bumper, why would it have been totaled in the first place?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Like I said in the OP, it's already been fixed.
        Sorry, I have a brain problem that doctors diagnosed as "stupidity". Its a learning disability.

        If you really like those cars and un-wrecked ones are actually double for similar miles it may be worth. But yeah like you said, do you trust an unknown who did the work? If it really was just body panels almost any monkey can do that. Was it tweaked and they did a frame-straighten? Metal can be bent back but maybe won't be as strong. That was a low-speed impact causing all that damage, so an identical crash might be worse on the car. The safety I personally wouldn't be worried about if the cabin wasn't remotely affected: thats the strong part, the hood and trunk areas are the crumple zones.

        But like I said before: some states you just can never get decent insurance on it for full coverage unless they agree it was professionally fixed and are willing to insure it in its rebuilt/salvage title status. Otherwise its liability only and any damage while you own it is on you for a fender bender or whatever. $18k for 10k mile Lincoln in otherwise great condition? Might be worth if you needed or really wanted a car like that. Underneath it all, its just a ford Fusion I think so nothing is super fancy or complicated. Rest of it is just ford parts outside of badges and good trim inside the cabin.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I get what you're saying, it just seems that it's too good to be true. A low speed impact that caused hardly any damage except some easy panel replacement and the entire thing is totalled? I'm not sure I'm buying it, but then again I'm not a mechanic or an underwriter

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Tough to say really: but yeah $18k for a 10k mile car that had relatively minor damages repaired? If it happened during covid and no parts were available for 6+ months and the insurance was looking at a rental for that long plus parts at a premium plus body shops charging whatever they felt like that day it may have been easier to just total it out. Maybe find out when the wreck and repairs happened? If a body shop bought it for $10k several years ago, put 3k of parts and labor at it and now selling it for $18k, that makes sense because I think even with 50k miles lincolns sell for $25-35k. They're not the best cars but like I said, they're just Fords with typical Ford problems, but they're all easy to fix.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You do bring up a good point with COVID, it IS a 2020

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Correct: insurance companies were "totaling out" stuff for crumpled fenders, broken lights, bumper, grill, and A-arms on stuff simply because parts doubled in price, and were on backorder for at least 6 months, realistically sometimes a year. How much does it cost an insurance company to rent a car for the customer for 6+ months? A lot. Thats opposed to simply buying the car from the insured and reselling to a reseller like copart.

            >t. insurancegay

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Buying a crashed lincoln out of detroit.
        heh. good luck to whoever gets approved on that loan.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I have cash I'm not loaning

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Its not really a liability unless its you and jethro repairing it while drunk. Theres nothing really mission critical back there likely to be damaged unless the frame is tweaked (hidden) or the rear suspension is affected. Minor tweaks can be corrected, but you don't have that equipment and will be paying someone several thousand to un-tweek it. That should be your "major" concern. Considering that "floor pan" of the trunk is crumpled, someone's going to have to un-tweak that if that entire assembly can't just be replaced. Meaning you're beating it on it for hours with a 3lb maul hoping it doesn't look like shit.

      The other stuff almost anybody can do: look up the price for a new trunk, quarter panels, bumper, bumper inserts, lights, and anything else that looks like it might be dented. Assuming all minor bits are there like parking sensors, thats all labor (and how body shops make their money) to detach and reset all those little sensors, emblems, foam, wiring harnesses, etc. You've got 2 avenues: buy new and have them painted with the rest of the car. Or buy junkyard parts in the same color and hope it all reasonably matches. Most of that shit is all bolt-on, some might be glued on from the factory and you have to just know how to remove them before breaking whatever part its attached to.

      If you've never done that kind of work before its daunting and you'll be doing it all by dead reckoning. I'm sure theres a youtube channel showing the gist of how its all done but in reality they cannot account for your vehicles specific damages, but its all the same process.

      Do you absolute fricking morons even read the OP??

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Its not really a liability unless its you and jethro repairing it while drunk. Theres nothing really mission critical back there likely to be damaged unless the frame is tweaked (hidden) or the rear suspension is affected. Minor tweaks can be corrected, but you don't have that equipment and will be paying someone several thousand to un-tweek it. That should be your "major" concern. Considering that "floor pan" of the trunk is crumpled, someone's going to have to un-tweak that if that entire assembly can't just be replaced. Meaning you're beating it on it for hours with a 3lb maul hoping it doesn't look like shit.

    The other stuff almost anybody can do: look up the price for a new trunk, quarter panels, bumper, bumper inserts, lights, and anything else that looks like it might be dented. Assuming all minor bits are there like parking sensors, thats all labor (and how body shops make their money) to detach and reset all those little sensors, emblems, foam, wiring harnesses, etc. You've got 2 avenues: buy new and have them painted with the rest of the car. Or buy junkyard parts in the same color and hope it all reasonably matches. Most of that shit is all bolt-on, some might be glued on from the factory and you have to just know how to remove them before breaking whatever part its attached to.

    If you've never done that kind of work before its daunting and you'll be doing it all by dead reckoning. I'm sure theres a youtube channel showing the gist of how its all done but in reality they cannot account for your vehicles specific damages, but its all the same process.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If you bought that, you basically start with unbolting everything that is actually damaged, make a punch-list of what needs to be replaced, then you go shopping for parts. While waiting for parts you're beating on the car with a hammer and possibly having a body shop straighten out the rear frame area so its within spec for SAFETY and ensuring the suspension wasn't tweaked. You'll use up an entire 2-car garage sorting everything out in staging, then the rest is just assembly. For $18k, then probably dozens or hundreds of man hours learning as you go, is that cost savings worth it?

      Then you have to consider for a salvage or rebuilt title some insurance carriers will never give you full coverage for the car. If you don't care about that then you get a cheesedick policy for rather low rates. Just be aware even if you fix that car up to be cherry again, any prospective buyer will want to know what you fixed and you'll sell it at a discount compared to similar un-crashed models. It can be fun, but theres probably no money in repairing these cars unless you're a professional bodyshop flipper.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Best case scenario no body shop tweaking necessary. No pinch welds involved and its 100% bolt-on parts. Great, you can do the value proposition today; shop for a trunk, quarter panels, bumper, just see what the prices for those new parts are. If the initial $18k plus used parts gets within 75% of a similar un-wrecked car, stop. Its not a good purchase. Because you're probably going to find a few plastic parts below the metal that broke, you're going to overpay for them because only Ford supplies those parts at full dealership markup. Little odds and ends to nickel and dime the total bill.

        Similarly, shop for a reasonably similiar car; same make and model in otherwise good condition. Even if it has 50-100k miles. If you can get that MKZ with 75k miles for $20k, buy that because 60,000 miles isn't really worth the aforementioned dozens of hours and headache of fixing this shit.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    check the repair. i wouldn't have any issues driving something like that around for the right price if the repair was acceptable.
    >check the frame
    >if frame seems okay, make sure the undercoating was added back or the repair will rust out quickly.
    >check the lighting/wiring within the trunk lid, license plate light
    >check trunk pan
    >check trunk, rear bumper, rear passenger door panel gaps with body
    >put it on an alignment rack and check rear alignment
    >check rear brake lines for pinching, damage
    >stand on rear bumper, make sure it doesn't fall off under your weight
    >check for bondo, too much? done improperly?
    now i don't care for Lincoln MKZ's and I wouldn't pay $18K for that. It will become a problematic car in the future for reasons other than the damage. They will depreciate rapidly and become $4K cars in a couple years. Your rebuilt branded title will not help you with the value of the car in the future either.
    You can get something a bit older with a few more miles that's more reliable for less than $10K. I don't spent more than $3K on the cars I buy. They are usually 90's shitboxes that are deemed valuable (either for parts or because ricers like them). However, you can find a nice Lincoln Towncar for $3-5K that has no damage, lowish miles, and an owner that cared for it.
    It really comes down to one question: Do you have $18K to throw at a beater that (in theory) should be reliable and problem-free for the next 90K miles?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I don't spent more than $3K on the cars I buy.
      All you had to say, my dude.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Better than throwing $18K at a pos Lincoln that was rear-ended and then repaired by Billy and the turbo will probably explode before it ever reaches 100K miles.
        Meanwhile my $3K cars can make it to 300K+ on oil changes and suspension maintenance.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          uh huh. We all believe you that you only spend $3k on a 20-30 year old shitbox that runs for 50-100k miles.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Old shitboxes are the easiest things to keep running. When you can count all of the sensors that the ECU needs to run the engine on your hands, there's not much that can go wrong as long as you keep your valves adjusted, oil changed, and cooling system leak free.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's no free lunch with these things

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on why it's salvaged.
    A car that's salvaged because the frame got a little bent and one that's been at the bottom of the lake are very different.
    Really you have to know what you're looking at to determine if it's worth getting.
    Also no matter how well it runs or how well you fix it, it's going to be a pita to sell it as a functioning car.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Quite frankly I'm just not experienced enough with mechanical shit to trust something like this. It basically just boils down to a gamble.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Your dad is a Boomer with too much time on his hands who thinks he can totally fix up a wreck. As stated earlier unless you have a metric frick ton of money or are a mechanic in a shop it is a stupid idea

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Re-read the OP you stupid piece.of shit

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >fricking stupid and a liability. Anyone with experience?
    If it's fully repaired and not just Black person rigged there's nothing wrong with the car itself other than the title. It's not a liability unless you are overly concerned with resale value or insurance value.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sure, but to the average person this is literally a 50/50 no?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Anyone with experience?
    Me and my friend import like 20 of this to the slavland so we bowling.
    We fix them in here and sell them.
    But you in Burgerland with Burgerland mechanics and prices...you going to be rape boy. Copart don't give a frick, you never know what you buying, unless you check it.
    Body damage in new cars are tricky as frick, all those cables modules. Without experience you don't know location of this shit in the car.
    Copart is gambling, but I'm in eastern europe shithool smoking malboro gold and you anon are in USA. Cars here are much more expenisive then in your country and sometimes even we don't make good money.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So i don't know how ppl in US can make profit fixing those cars in US. Like here with much more cheap labor we often cut corners to make money.
      Sorry i don't answered the question in first post. I'm little drunk.
      If you ask me, slavland rebuild cars seller NO don't do it. Unless they show you what they done part by part. Show you picture of damage ect. Rebuild business is shady as frick i know this first hand

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So i don't know how ppl in US can make profit fixing those cars in US. Like here with much more cheap labor we often cut corners to make money.
      Sorry i don't answered the question in first post. I'm little drunk.
      If you ask me, slavland rebuild cars seller NO don't do it. Unless they show you what they done part by part. Show you picture of damage ect. Rebuild business is shady as frick i know this first hand

      Thanks for the honesty. IMO I agree with you as far as modern cars and module/circuits and sensors. Even if it was fixed decently the cars computing system is going to re-frick-ulate it somehow

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My family were small timers in the rebuilt /salvage auto biz and all of my car shopping from 15-33 yrs old was done at salvage lots (copart, iaai, sadisco) but that was over 10 yrs ago and before the explosion of internet "look how ez this is!" which had made it harder and more expensive.
    First off theres really nothing wrong with buying a salvage title car IF (!!!) you're planning to drive it until the wheels fall off (don't care about resale value). I think it's good that you know where the car was damaged (photos) so you can check the quality if repairs, unless you're just a total pants on head moron that doesn't know what he's looking at, and if you are then this is not the car for you because you'll be blaming your dad, the dealership, the mechanic and everyone else the first time you get a flat tire or something. If that's you, then don't buy it.
    Don't buy a water car, electrical fire or severely front hit vehicle. Drive it and make sure there's no wind noise from poorly aligned doors, etc.
    You can get some food values but if you're a manchild or total wrenchlet then stay away.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The 3.0T with AWD has 400HP and goes from 0-60 in under 5 seconds. Fuel economy sasy 17 on the box, but you can get 20 if you don't have a lead foot. The Revel speakers are absolutely worth it.
    Just something to consider if you have the money

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depending on where you live it's going to be borderline impossible to get a salvage car over the pits and certified as road worthy EVEN IF there's nothing actually wrong with it. Many places require to mechanics inspecting it to take full responsibility for any faults of their certify it, and therefore the mechanics either won't do it or they'll charge you an enormous amount of money and will insist on going over it with a fine toothed combed to make absolutely sure they're not liable for any problems.

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