can you prove him wrong?

can you prove him wrong?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Modern cars are "more reliable" but a $70 fix on a 90s miata is an $800 fix on even a 10 y.o. german car. The miata might break down more, but damn those parts are cheap and a child could replace them.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      people tend to remember how things in life make them feel more than anything else. they are probably mixing up reliability with perseverance and serviceability. you probably won't be too annoyed about replacing the fuel filter on a car from the 70s or something because there was so much room; you likely were able to sit in the engine bay to do shit. but you'd remember the bullshit you had to go through replacing the starter that was inside the troony bell housing for example. older cars are usually easier to get access to components in, and they generally still kept working even if something was out of whack; obd1 systems are a great example of this, you can often make them do shit and they might give you a code but otherwise it just shuts the frick up and lets you drive normally otherwise. newer obd2 systems might put it in limp mode or whatever even if you know it's a nothingburger.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      No, he's right. Until about 2010 when they really started jamming tech into cars. Then cars started getting less reliable, more difficult to work on, and more expensive to repair again.

      Exactly. It's why I bought a simple car with cheap parts and no gimmicks
      >2005 Ford F-150 rear tail light gets wet
      >nothing happens
      >2018 Ford F-150 rear tail light gets wet
      >CANbus failure
      >no start condition
      >$5600 to replace LED tail light with integrated rear radar sensor

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >even a 10 y.o. german car
      Ironically part standardisation means parts are pretty cheap if you don't mind a different badge

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Ironically part standardisation means parts are pretty cheap if you don't mind a different badge
        (x) Doubt.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Bad example

      >EXTREMELY popular car (for car enthusiasts anyway)
      >literally has one of the biggest aftermarkets around
      >millions were made
      >been around long enough for community to know every nook and cranny inside and out
      >documentation on EVERYTHING

      Could you say the same about, say, the Mazda protege of the same year?

      You simply CAN'T get that kind of support with new cars, even if they are beloved. I think it's more of an issue of manufactures making parts more accessible and providing support for aftermarkets. (especially the German ones).

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My last car was more reliable than any other car I owned. Nothing went wrong.
    Ever.
    Even when it came to Hondas, the 2019 2.0t Accord was without issue for years and hard driving. So I kinda agree, but I didn't read the whole thing.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i do not a single person who voluntarily owns a car that is more than 10 years old or has more than 100,000 miles or would ever buy such a car, in fact the only idk 2 people I know who would ever buy a used car would only do so out of financial prudence

    "car people" are like audiophiles who don't realize 99% of people listen to 96 kbps 48 kHz MP3s on phone speakers in terms of how completely out of touch they are with normalgays

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This 100%
      "Hardcore" hobbyists don't know how 99.95% of their interest's market operates.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This 100%
      "Hardcore" hobbyists don't know how 99.95% of their interest's market operates.

      What does this have to do with OPs post?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        "Muh old cars are more reliable" is poorgay cope

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Not really. Too many variables to outright declare one way or the other.
          My OPINION is older stuff is simpler and therefore more reliable.
          Newer stuff is too filled with tech and sensors. More things to break. Therefore more unreliable.
          Coupled with trends of lowering costs to get more profits. New cars suck

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Poorgay cope
            Modern cars are better in every single way

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >le contrary belief troll strikes again
            DA is so damn predictable and boring these days

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I have a 1986, a 1996, a 2007, and a 2013.
      and i'll keep the 1986 and the 2007 as long as i possibly can.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      2 months ago I bought a 2012 car.

      I have a 2013 F150 with 198k. It's been through some shit. Rescuing idiots in floods, towing shit around huge cattle ranches, daily commuting for 10 years, driving through hunting properties. Parked on the beach for days at a time. Hauling yards of mulch for me and my neighbors every spring. I would buy this truck right now over a brand new F150 for the same price.

      I have a 2016 Challenger SRT. It's poorly built yes, but I've been able to fix every problem myself so far. Not so much a champion of reliability, but ease of repair is decent at least.

      My mom has an 08 MDX with 160k. Runs perfectly fine. I just did the brakes a few months ago and the wheels needed balancing.

      My dad has an 05 Tacoma that has never been to a mechanic. He doesn't even rotate his tires because all 4 wear perfectly even, a story he tells every get together.

      My neighbor has a 2019 Explorer. Big piece of shit. Been back for warranty work three times that I know of. His wife had a low speed collision (no airbag deployment) and had to replace the bumper, fascia, hood, both front fenders, both headlights, radiator, condenser, one motor mount, and the front crossmember support piece that holds all that crap together.

      Buddy of mine bought a 2018 Acadia. Now paid off, warranty expired. Headlight had some problem, not sure. Dealership charged him $5500 because replacement was an engine pull.

      Goddamn I could go on. New cars get shittier by the model year.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Newer cars just don't feel like cars. My current car is a 2004 Ford Tauros and while I don't love it, being my first car and all, it's still my first car.
    So when I accidentally rear ended a dude and left a few scratches on his rear bumper I took it to an auto repair place insurance told me to go too and got a rental
    The rental car was a 2023 Chevy Trailblazer and I hated it. It didn't feel like a car it felt like an overly comfy gliding machine. What's worse was that it was summer time and the windows are shaped like ass so instead of wind whipping through my hair I had to use the ac because the wind just assaulted my face in all the wrong ways
    I was so happy to get my shit car back because at least it felt like a car.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Unfortunately, I think that's the point anon.
      Most people don't want to feel like they're operating a complex machine. They just need to get where they're going and any other bullshit in between would just be a neusance to them.
      It's understandable really when you start looking at cars as a form of transportation rather than, well... A car.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >current year
    >buy car from 2006-2009
    >enough safety features that the only thing that'll kill you is a front-overlap crash at 65mph with a fully loaded semi truck (unless you drive a subcompact amerishart car, or the japanese equivalent like a Versa - you die.)
    >parts are in abundance, overflow genuine parts from dealerships and aftermarket won't dry until 2035 or longer
    it pays to be a decade behind if you can wrench. you can even find deals for shitbox condition high-tier performance buckets and fix them up for $700 cause "duh dealership said these 4 10 year old sensors and module would cost $1800"
    modern cars are reliable. but it's being knowledgeable about new tech that is difficult for DAtists. i ran into my first hybrid at my tiny ass independent shop and seeing the orange-colored frickhueg cables blew me away. it was like looking at alien tech. after some reading it was like any other electronic.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ain't reading that shit

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The sweet spot for reliability is from about 1995-2010. You're got relaibly, transistoried electronics that straight up dont' fail unless physically damaged, proven well designed suspension that can be easily fixed in most cases and sometimes even galvanised bodies so the body doesn't even rust in a hurry.
    After ~2010 for most brands, you have more and more shit being rammed in just for the sake of it, that WILL break because it's built down to a price below reliability, parts become more and more serialised (headlamps for example), and rather than having a bulb you've got an LED unit that shouldn't fail, but does, and you have to change the entire, serialised unit at a cost of £2000 instead of a £1.20 bulb.
    Add to that electronic handbrakes, adaptive suspension and so forth and suddenly what was a £90 caliper is £700 and has to be coded in at the dealer with a diag that costs £1500 (or might even be a subscription service)

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >can you prove him wrong?
    Whew that was a tough one

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