do they make after market OSs for modern cars?

do they make after market OSs for modern cars? so many modern cars gather data on your driving, lock features, run slow as shit, or just be awful. is there anyone with a solution for this?
most modern cars run linux already, its not that hard to crack

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm sure someone is fricking around with it. Problem is you have no idea what software is running and how. I wouldn't be surprised if most stuff just runs as root because frick your security.
    Best bet would be to scrape the OS image off the computer, then start poking through it and replicating desired features and ignoring shitty ones.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/3vdc8ml.jpg

      do they make after market OSs for modern cars? so many modern cars gather data on your driving, lock features, run slow as shit, or just be awful. is there anyone with a solution for this?
      most modern cars run linux already, its not that hard to crack

      This would probably be your best bet. I wouldn't doubt there's some open source stuff for different on board infotainment systems, but if there's any integrated stuff such as engaging traction control systems or other sensor data thats necessary for the car, you'd have to isolate exactly what you wanted to replace unless someone has that functionality already accounted for in an open source os. Otherwise you're gonna lose half your cars controls and have undocumented electronic gremlins

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I swapped my mystery linux head unit that's probably a GPL violation for not giving me the kernel source with a chink Android one, that count?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Install gentoo

  4. 1 month ago
    s10fag

    >modern
    tldr; no

    you can get a microsquirt or something but if your car lacks canbus then its computers are so rudimentary there's likely nothing to gain from it. Talking 6502-tier tech. Calculators and atari - tier. Shit you could literally assemble on a breadboard if you were autistic. A couple aftermarket computers do work on canbus but they dont control other things on the system like that, your satnav is still going to be talking to sky juice.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I want to see a 1950s car with efi but it has to be controlled by a vacuum tube computer.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        holley makes an EFI kit for carbureted cars, they're pretty common and perform pretty well
        if you mean oem, some cars had EFI in the 1960s, they were run with solid state computers. volkswagen type 3 comes to mind.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i could do that with like one, maybe two tubes.
        if(running rich) send_less_fuel();
        if(running lean) send_more_fuel();
        a la Vortec 4300 TBI

      • 1 month ago
        s10fag

        See bosch D-Jetronic, extremely rudiamentary setup for what is otherwise now pretty common style components

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I wouldn’t frick with a brand new car. I removed the black box & 3G antenna from my 12 year old car and had no issues, but don’t be surprised if your 2024 doesn’t turn on after fricking with the console

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My solution is to not drive that gay shit in the first place.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      sure, but in due time there wont be a choice but to buy a new car.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        t. Wrenchlet busrider

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >parts will always be available

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I can get parts for a 50+ year old car overnighted to me now.

            If its a rare part CNC machine operators/programmers could effectively copy it with enough time.

            3d printers are becoming more capable by the year.

            Explain to me how that will some how magically change in 100 years?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Anyone smart enough to operate a computer is going to stop reproducing and no one will know how to make CNC machinery anymore.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why the frick would you want to "drive" a modern car?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Its called being normal, incel.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why are you trying to be a normie? They get the most taken advantage of.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          And you can't even pass on your genes, the very core purpose of a normal male human.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Lots of baseless claims, but I can make those too.
            >the very core purpose of a normal male human.
            According to who? You?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Its called being normal, incel.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This is a good call. We really ought to get more autists from >>>DA interested in cars so we could ensure future old cars are still accessible to us.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It turns out people are more reluctant to frick around and potentially brick their $40k rolling computers than their $400 handheld computers, so there's fewer minds working on this kind of thing.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Long story short, car got it's homologation with that piece of software, if you change it, you make your car legally not roadworthy, so that's a problem. Anyone wanting to put an aftermarket system out there would have to either get some certification for it safety wise of face ridiculous lawsuits the moment one of the cars equpped with it runs into a kindergarten. There's no financial incentive to frick about with that. As for hacking it yourself it is possible but definitely not easy, wouldn't be surprised at all if there's a hardware auth crap in the actual computer preventing non original code to even run, and even if you can actually hack your way through it i also expect most of the critical pieces are provided as blobs with interfaces as obscure as possible to make it a nightmare to reverse engineer.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >critical pieces are provided as blobs with interfaces as obscure as possible
      In other words, the code running on it is so shitty that you can't possibly comprehend what it's doing under the hood. Four different companies with thousands of pajeets hacking together the frickugliest bare metal C++ you can imagine on a proprietary compiler toolchain made for their obscure chink chipset in 1993.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sounds about right.
        I once had a peek at some open-sourced Android code written at a "Qualcomm Innovation Center" in India. The code responsible for selecting audio outputs and inputs looked like its writer didn't really know C, or even the basic concepts of structured programming. It could probably have been a table of modes and a simple loop to pick the right one, but instead was this long litany of near-identical if() statements in random order. Maybe it handled all possible cases, maybe it didn't.
        Shit like that is probably why cars sometimes e.g. struggle to pair with a phone. The shitty code just can't get the car's hardware and software into the right state to talk with it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >if you change it, you make your car legally not roadworthy,
      well thats fricking shit.
      how do we allow this? modern cars spy on you. how is that legal? why cant i remove all that bloat?
      i own the car. if i cant own the software, i should be able to load my own.
      this is separate from the ECU, im talking about the infotainment shit, not traction control.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >how do we allow this?
        lobbyists
        >modern cars spy on you. how is that legal?
        lobbyists
        >why cant i remove all that bloat?
        If the bloat is an "integral part" of the software that would be a modification of that software. And i bet it legally is cause car companies have no interest in letting you have options you haven't paid them for.
        >i own the car. if i cant own the software, i should be able to load my own.
        You don't even own the car really right now, not to the extent a normal person would assume under the idea of ownership
        >this is separate from the ECU, im talking about the infotainment shit, not traction control.
        You might try to image the storage and poke around, it's a tossup, you might be able to trim the bloat and reflash it and have it running, you might slam face first in the integrity check that refuses to start the car with even the infotainment code changed.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This post is a bunch of dumb boomer FUD and lies.
      There is no "homologation" with road car electronics, and nobody really cares if you modify the head unit.

      however it is true that they use kind of obscure or depricated software on purpose and there is a legal liability aspect to keeping you from messing with the software on the device.
      For the most part I've noticed mfgs lock out hacked update packages by signing them with the cars VIN and preventing you from even downloading the package unless you enter it, ensuring you can't simply build a modded update package and expect the car to load it.
      the actual software on the head units is usually pretty off-the-shelf and insecure and the hardware is easily cracked, but it's a lot of work and requires some specialized equipment to get around the fact that the production head unit computer has no ports like a normal PC. Usually they leave unpopulated jtag debug ports on the boards and that's a way in but again it's a lot of work for very minimal benefit (and no pay).

      tl;dr: security by obscurity and annoyance is not real software security, don't confuse laziness for malice.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >There is no "homologation" with road car electronics, and nobody really cares if you modify the head unit.
        There's a bit of a difference, legally speaking, between a dumb media unit and an integrated system that can control the car, if it can affect functionality it is part of the control system and thus very much a subject to homologation. Also, since you are so sure of what you said i'll just point out electronic systems in a car undergo quite thorough inspection EM wise, so there is very much such a thing as homologation for road car electronics.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          ok well the "integrated system" you're talking about literally doesn't exist so your entire post is pointless larping foppery
          even Tesla technically has a separate system controlling the infotainment and displays they just structures their internal network so that the same CPU can perform multiple tasks instead of having multiple modules with their own processors.

          the last thing an mfg wants is to have a car where the infotainment could potentially be a safety hazard by disabling critical functionality in the event of a software crash so those systems do not have any real control, they basically "suggest" to the other appropriate modules what to do, for the reasons you just outlined.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >ok well the "integrated system" you're talking about literally doesn't exist
            Sorry to disappoint you but they do and it sucks, obviously not in the sense of a whole monolitic "app" that would run everything but the interconnection is getting disturbing with those. Last fricked up thing i read was the idea of pushing nix as the platform for automotive systems (that's gonna go great), and the supposed reason for it is "better separation of the subsystems", if a hypervisor is a better separation than whatever cost cutting shit they are running now i am officially concerned.
            >the same CPU
            And here's the main problem, computers are incredibly dumb, most people don't even realize how dumb they are. If you use the same hardware for mission critical systems and playing Cardi B you are asking for trouble, a fatal error in one of the subsystems can bork the whole thing. Additionally, the lack of software separation is a problem, in the older layout it was reasonable, rock solid control unit just talking with the flashy goyslop, but that's too expensive (physical buttons are too expensive for those fricks), so my point is, the whole thing needs to be thoroughly tested to prevent some buggy app mem leaking and making the computer do some random shit, cause it will do any radnom shit it thinks it should do if you feed it wrong data. And that's the main problem with messing with those, the system is made, tested, locked and deployed and not really meant to be "user serviceable", it is by all meaning of the word an integrated system. Not that it means it's a good or safe system, but that's kinda the standard in the consoomer economy.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Long story short, car got it's homologation with that piece of software, if you change it, you make your car legally not roadworthy, so that's a problem. Anyone wanting to put an aftermarket system out there would have to either get some certification for it safety wise of face ridiculous lawsuits the moment one of the cars equpped with it runs into a kindergarten. There's no financial incentive to frick about with that. As for hacking it yourself it is possible but definitely not easy, wouldn't be surprised at all if there's a hardware auth crap in the actual computer preventing non original code to even run, and even if you can actually hack your way through it i also expect most of the critical pieces are provided as blobs with interfaces as obscure as possible to make it a nightmare to reverse engineer.
      Funny you say that in Australia you get a 5000 dollarydoos fine for turning off. Safety systems

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Once a prison colony, always a prison colony

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    install gentoo

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Fun fact: Chrysler UConnect systems run QNX, but the interface is drawn with Flash (!!!) and Java.
    So basically all those guys who made Newgrounds games back in the day got jobs working for Harman and Panasonic making car head units.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >QNX
      QNX is kina cool, i remember their old demo of the whole QNX system with basic desktop functionality on one floppy (yup, that old).

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Toyota had like 500k lines of C in their deadly throttle pedals 15 years ago, I can't even imagine what kind of horrors we have now with all-digital head units and CAN everywhere.

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