Does anyone have any recommendations for brake line flare tools that can easily work with stainless steel lines?

Does anyone have any recommendations for brake line flare tools that can easily work with stainless steel lines?

I'm trying to finish replacing the brake lines on my car, and I'm trying to re-do some of the flares that aren't sealing. They were all pre-bent and pre-flared from the company I bought them from, I don't have whatever equipment flared it in the first place. I tried using a standard rental tool from Autozone, and the stainless steel is so tough, it's just slipping on the line without bending much. I need something that can grip better, at least.

And no, I'm not trying to use single flares.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    use the sqt newfriend

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That tool is almost exactly the same as the one I tried to use, which is the one that didn't work.

      I need something that grips stainless steel lines better than this.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        just tighten it down harder, it won't deform

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I did, I tightened it down to where slipping a feeler gauge in between the pieces would've been impossible.

          The two halves of the tool couldn't have gotten any closer together, and the brake line still slips without bending.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Not every flaring tool has the same ID or jaw friction. Cheap ones suck. Now you know why. A thin strip of emery cloth or sandpaper may pad the jaws sufficient to capture the line.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >A thin strip of emery cloth or sandpaper may pad the jaws sufficient to capture the line.
            Man, I was thinking of using steel wool. I feel like an idiot, how the frick did I not think of sandpaper or emery cloth before?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Oh yeah, I forgot to mention earlier, that this didn't work for me either.

            It just crushed the sandpaper, and actually made the tube easier to slide than otherwise. I've never seen 80 grit so pulverized before. So, above all, I wouldn't recommend this based on my experience.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            try finer grit. smaller particle size means more surface area for grip

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I wasn't sure, I figured crushing it between a figurative rocky gorge would've been enough to hold it in place. I figured it would dig in to the steel, but it just crushed the sandpaper flat. Your idea probably would've worked.

            I know I'm projecting still, but this literally just hurts me to think about. I slightly fricked up a perfectly good tool on the first use, for the one thing I needed it for, total waste of money.

            I feel like such an idiot, it's like I'm literally dying inside.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >I feel like such an idiot, it's like I'm literally dying inside.

            Let emotions go. Emotions are bad.

            >they are (or were, twenty years ago) much more expensive.
            They still are.

            This thing works good though [...]

            I'd give it a go. You won't always get good tools so live and learn. The cost of mistakes during that process is trivial overall.

            If you can bring a piece and try it in the store that's not a bad idea.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Let emotions go. Emotions are bad.
            I can't stop thinking about everything, I can't feel comfortable in my own skin, I feel physically unwell, and I have no friends to comfort me anymore. I can't find solace in anything. I don't have much of anything in life, every little thing that goes wrong affects me more than it should, because what else do I have?...

            I can't even get the car to start now either, it's like I'm the embodiment of Murphy's Law.

            >I'd give it a go
            Already did, works good.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            i'm using harbor freight's maddox brand. i'd be surprised if there was anything cheaper. picrel is what kept happening before i gave it a good tightening. the double flare die would just push the tube down

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I think the brand of the one I was using was literally just "OEM". (Yes, there is a company called OEM.) The two halves of the tool were touching each other, there was no gap like in your pic.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/TlvQpEA.jpg

          i'm using harbor freight's maddox brand. i'd be surprised if there was anything cheaper. picrel is what kept happening before i gave it a good tightening. the double flare die would just push the tube down

          This isn't working at all, it's still just pushing the tube out the die and ruining the tool.

          I had that thing clamped down so hard and it still couldn't hold, I mean look at this, It's flattened part of the threads and crushed the washer on the wingnut, and the tube still slipped.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Can I even return this shit? Does anyone know off the top of their head real quick?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/TlvQpEA.jpg

          i'm using harbor freight's maddox brand. i'd be surprised if there was anything cheaper. picrel is what kept happening before i gave it a good tightening. the double flare die would just push the tube down

          And here's what the line looks like, didn't even dig into it at all.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I found this thing at O'reillys, though. The "jaws" for lack of a better work look the same as the expensive tools, that being completely smooth bore, and the tool isn't hydraulic.

            And I just found a video of someone using it on stainless steel likes with good results.

            I guess I can haul my indecisive, frugal, broke ass back over there, and take another stab at my heart and shell out another $50.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            i like how the die lube warns that it's not safe for consumption

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            They mean don't put it in your ass
            The 5 gallon buckets of wire pulling lube have the same warning.
            >t. sparky

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Flaring tools vary in quality and you are seeing why that matters.

        https://i.imgur.com/Ohz6EWC.jpg

        I have this tool.
        Only one I found that will flair stainless consistently.
        Other tools above are junk in my experience.
        Bite the bullet and buy a tool that basically does 99% of car flairs up to 1/2in

        ^Nice

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Heat. I will recommend a RIMAC™ MAPP-burner to make the steel more ductile, giving you a better flare. The RIMAC™ burner is assuredly the best tool for the job, and a must-have for all quality-minded individuals!

        You should be able to purchase your RIMAC™ products from all local retailers, or on the internet from serious dealers!

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I don't want to frick up the metallurgy of the lines.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have this tool.
    Only one I found that will flair stainless consistently.
    Other tools above are junk in my experience.
    Bite the bullet and buy a tool that basically does 99% of car flairs up to 1/2in

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >$351
      This makes me wanna kill myself.

      I'm so miserable I can't even enjoy the physical act of working on my cars anymore, I just want something functional that I can be proud of, I don't want to waste any more money, I don't know what I[m supposed to do...

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's not a waste of money.
        It's a tool that can be used over your lifetime.

        Cars are also money traps 99% of the time.
        Get used to it homosexual.
        Get a side gig going and help pay for stuff

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I'm just fricking sad. I don't have any friends, my family is terrible, I have no sense of self worth, everyone left me when I needed them the most, everything I do leads to failure. I can't find anything that makes me happy anymore, I couldn't even prove to myself that I could keep the best friends I've ever had. I just want things to stop going wrong in my life, I was supposed to get this freaking brake job done yesterday.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            leddit is that way

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Boohoo Black person, either kys or dont, we're not your therapist

            I did, I tightened it down to where slipping a feeler gauge in between the pieces would've been impossible.

            The two halves of the tool couldn't have gotten any closer together, and the brake line still slips without bending.

            >tool can't close tight enough to grip the line
            Take a grinder to the tool and take material off the sides that close together so they can get closer and grip the line.
            fricks sake you tiktok addled zoomers can't think. If the tool doesn't work modify it until it does.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Boohoo Black person, either kys or dont, we're not your therapist
            I would say the same thing to you, if you had no family or friends, or self worth. Which you clearly don't.

            >Take a grinder to the tool and take material off the sides that close together so they can get closer and grip the line.
            fricks sake you tiktok addled zoomers can't think. If the tool doesn't work modify it until it does.
            Since you are completely unable to follow context, it was a rental tool. I couldn't even do that.

            I did buy one for myself though, one that can get closer together, but even this didn't work. See here

            https://i.imgur.com/MowApBb.jpg

            [...]
            This isn't working at all, it's still just pushing the tube out the die and ruining the tool.

            I had that thing clamped down so hard and it still couldn't hold, I mean look at this, It's flattened part of the threads and crushed the washer on the wingnut, and the tube still slipped.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Locate a known good professional manual flaring tool rated for stainless or replace the line with a complete prebent part.

        Ask on automotive forums what line mechanics use. Hobbyists have limited exposure to equipment. Knowledge is power and manual tools for less money exist.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >or replace the line with a complete prebent part.
          I already did that, I don't want to buy another one. I just wanna fix the new line flares that were fricked up from the company that I bought them from.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >bout tree fiddy

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >I want to double flare stainless tube
    Good luck homie. There's a reason most just go to AN-3

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What is AN-3?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Army/Navy style fittings. You know, those red and blue ones. The "-3" meaning 3/16" tube size. It uses a single flare with a sleeve that backs up the flare and prevents the tubing itself from being exposed to friction when the fitting is tightened.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Army/Navy style fittings. You know, those red and blue ones.
          No, I can't say I've ever seen them before.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        AN tube sleeves are an option.
        The nut and sleeve are super cheap.
        Like $1 for both at a hydraulic shop.
        Only requires a 37 degree single flair.
        Although your cheap tool probably only does 45 degrees.
        Attach it to an adapter that goes from 3an to whatever inverted flair you are using.
        Or bring the line to a hydraulic shop and just have them do it.

        Or find someone with a proper tool.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I still don't really trust single flares since they can crack.

          I'll probably just use this thing

          https://i.imgur.com/rvXsOPd.jpg

          I found this thing at O'reillys, though. The "jaws" for lack of a better work look the same as the expensive tools, that being completely smooth bore, and the tool isn't hydraulic.

          And I just found a video of someone using it on stainless steel likes with good results.

          I guess I can haul my indecisive, frugal, broke ass back over there, and take another stab at my heart and shell out another $50.

          Let's see how it goes tomorrow.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Single flairs don't crack any more or less than a double flair of you arn't moronic.

            Cut stainless tube.
            Use a flat file to file end smooth and remove any stressed hardened material.
            De-burr inside and out.
            If it's under 70F, you can heat up stainless a tiny bit.
            Single flair it easily.
            Done.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            https://i.imgur.com/rvXsOPd.jpg

            I found this thing at O'reillys, though. The "jaws" for lack of a better work look the same as the expensive tools, that being completely smooth bore, and the tool isn't hydraulic.

            And I just found a video of someone using it on stainless steel likes with good results.

            I guess I can haul my indecisive, frugal, broke ass back over there, and take another stab at my heart and shell out another $50.

            That tool makes single and double flares. I use it for my lines, but I only buy Nickle-Copper lines because unlike you I don't want to spend three days trying to flare stainless steel lines.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Once I started using it, it works perfectly fine actually. I can't really complain about it. (Make sure to lube the threads too, no one ever does that for some reason, but that double end bolt piece turns a lot easier when making flares, then.)

            The only thing I can complain about, is the hardware I bought is just not fricking working. The problem now, is the unions I bought previously aren't long enough to catch any threads on the tube bolts. I swear to god, it's like I fix one problem, and discover 10 more in the process. It's like I have the competency of GM in the 70s and 80s.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >mushroom

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sorry, but you're gonna need a flare that's rated for stainless tubing and yeah, they are (or were, twenty years ago) much more expensive.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >they are (or were, twenty years ago) much more expensive.
      They still are.

      This thing works good though

      https://i.imgur.com/rvXsOPd.jpg

      I found this thing at O'reillys, though. The "jaws" for lack of a better work look the same as the expensive tools, that being completely smooth bore, and the tool isn't hydraulic.

      And I just found a video of someone using it on stainless steel likes with good results.

      I guess I can haul my indecisive, frugal, broke ass back over there, and take another stab at my heart and shell out another $50.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I hate this cold weather, can't do shit outside. I just want it to be above 30, at least.

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