How did my friend's Tesla Model 3 RWD feel so fast when he launches it at low speeds?

How did my friend's Tesla Model 3 RWD feel so fast when he launches it at low speeds? It puts you into your seat so frickin hard, felt way faster than my Camaro SS.
Model 3 RWD advertised 0-60 is 5.8 seconds... 271 hp and 310 lb-ft torque... That's poverty tier numbers...
Camaro SS is advertised 0-60 in 4.3 seconds, 455 hp and 455 lb-ft of torque
I'm sure my car would destroy his in like 40 roll or something, but I'm wondering how it felt so fast at low speeds like 10 mph to 30 mph?
What's the s()yience behind this?

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  1. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    You probably need to put the Camaro in fast mode. All cars made past 2007 start out in slow mode. Gotta push buttons, maybe flip through menus to actually lay down the power

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      Uh yeah it's on track mode.

      • 7 days ago
        Anonymous

        Then I guess SS means Super Slow in your Camaro, and model 3 is higher performance

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      As opposed to cars from before then where you had to tear out and replace every other mechanical component to make power

  2. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    What the FRICK IS THE S*C*NCE BEHIND THIS ?

  3. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Your friend is a homosexual

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      Nah he straight G, he a real homie on foenem grave.

  4. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    you are a homosexual also know as american

  5. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Electric Motors have peak torque at 0 rpm and it goes down off a cliff the further it spins in case this isn't a troll thread on DA - cars. That's why Teslas don't really have top end.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Gas cars lag at start up and feels like grandma's car. You have no power at the startline

      Probably not used to that type of acceleration, if you spent 3 years driving the tesla going to your camaro would feel real fast. Acceleration on the train kinda feels fast even if takes a minute to get to about 60.

      Yeah I think the 0-30 time is really good...
      Not all 0-60s are the same...
      Car A can get to 60 in 5 seconds, by going to 30 mph in 2.5 seconds and then 60 mph in 5 seconds.
      Car B can also get to 60 in 5 seconds, by going to 30 mph in 1 second, and then 60 mph in the remaining 4 seconds.
      But the second car feels much faster.

      Not even at 0 rpm, I feel like even at 10 mph to 30 mph it was pretty fast.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Not true, torque is constant across the rev range. The lower power at high speed is probably because the power feed for the motor just can't keep up with the motors demands. Or, it could be power throttled to limit heat output.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        You shouldnt post the very first thing that comes up on a google search, it proves you dont know what you're talking about.

        Electric motors -can- have a flat non falling torque curve but they need to be RPM limited inside that range.
        Almost all real electric motors look like this real Model 3 dyno: As RPM increases we go out of a performance envelope and into falling torque due to various electromagnetic laws.

  6. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Gas cars lag at start up and feels like grandma's car. You have no power at the startline

  7. 7 days ago
    Sage all ugly slow gay cars

    homosexual shill. evs are GAY as FRICK and mostly feel slow as frick off the line. Mostly.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Awwwww little b***h 🙁

  8. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Probably not used to that type of acceleration, if you spent 3 years driving the tesla going to your camaro would feel real fast. Acceleration on the train kinda feels fast even if takes a minute to get to about 60.

  9. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Electric motors can deliver immediate and constant power. So it’s more efficient in regard to getting you to overcome the forces keeping you stationary. But that’s 0-60. 60-100 is more complicated because the forces you’re overcoming to propel forward are a bit different.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >So it’s more efficient in regard to getting you to overcome the forces keeping you stationary
      As I said, it wasn't just launches from stationary, even at 10 mph accelerating to 30 mph felt really fast.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        Meant this

        But do you not understand how moving at 10 mph is a lot closer to stationary than moving at 60 mph…?

        For you

  10. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    But do you not understand how moving at 10 mph is a lot closer to stationary than moving at 60 mph…?

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Yes but also no... i thought there is static friction to overcome when moving from 0 mph, but that is not there in 10 mph or 60 mph... if i remember from physics class that is the difference in principle between accelerating a stationary vs moving object

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        The principle is the same either way. There are forces to be overcome. I really don’t see what you’re not getting about this. The reason a car moves forward is because the motor generates power and that power is transferred to the wheels and the wheels rotate, propelling the car forward. With electric motors, you can deliver power very quickly. So the amount of power you need to reach 60 mph is delivered instantly it only takes a few seconds to get to 60 mph. But to get up to 100 mph, you’re still overcoming the same forces as you were at 60 mph, so you need more power to get you there. (Some) electric motors are really good at giving enough power to get you up to 60 mph instantly, but not so good at giving the amount power you’d need to get up to 100 mph instantly. That, and the heavier weight of the car means that you need more power to propel it at all than you would in a lighter car. So it’s a consequence of how much power the motor can put out (and transfer to the wheels), the weight of the car, and how quickly it can deliver it. The great strength of the electric vehicles is not so much the power of the motor, or the weight of the vehicle. The power they can generate is comparable to a combustion engine and the weight is much higher. It’s real strength how quickly it can deliver it. When I floor a Tesla, I’m delivering just the right amount of power so quickly that it rockets to 60 mph.

  11. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Instant electric torque. It’s something you can’t replicate with a combustion engine.

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