how often to change full synthetic oil? owners manual says to do it every 6k miles/12 months.

how often to change full synthetic oil?

owners manual says to do it every 6k miles/12 months. Is that fine or should i do it sooner?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I do every 5,000 miles in the naturally aspirated cars and every 3,000 miles in the turbo cars

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Car is brandie new
      3k
      >Car is normal age
      5k
      >Car is smelly old
      3k
      >Car is an antique
      Every time you drive

      Also good

      Every 15000 to 18000 miles

      moron alert

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I check it every 1.5k or so to see if it's getting nasty. My car runs pretty clean though so I usually do 5k. 5k typically gets it just past the golden brown point. If you run the piss out of it then it'll be sooner but I do a lot of highway miles so it isn't that bad.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Oil is cheap, engines are not
    You pretty much cannot change it too often, but you CAN change it too infrequently. I do twice a year on my bikes but that oil sees a lot harder abuse than a car driven regularly. How do you drive? Is it a 4cyl econobox that you drive 25 miles a day and never go over 4000rpm, let it warm up nicely, use good fuel, and otherwise premium products? Is it a turbocharged boxer that you're seeing redline or driving fewer than 10 miles at a time? If you're gentle on your car and not stomping on the engine you could probably get away with 6kmiles/12mo, if you're abusing the engine and oil you're a dumbdumb if you change it just once a year.

    Are you changing it yourself or paying a lubeshop monkey to do it for you? Do you want the car to last 400,000 miles, or are you going to get rid of it in 2 years for something shinier? If you're doing it yourself and you want the thing to last forever, change twice a year. If you're going to trade up to anything else once a year to save $50.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >You pretty much cannot change it too often
      i wish i could find that pic some lube monkey took of an old guy that took his car in for an oil change and the oil was still a golden colour. the guy wouldn't budge went told it didnt need to be changed. iirc it was 1500 miles after the previous change.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        yeah I mean, theres no harm being done to the engine if the old man only drove 1500 miles for the last 12 months the old man is right in wanting the oil changed and the lube monkey is kinda being rude.

        Even if its still a clear golden color the oil is still breaking down with exposure to air and water turning acidic and performing worse.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          it hadn't been a year. i found the post on reddit (sue me), turns out it was an old lady who drove 23 miles in 8 months and wanted an oil change

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Probably not needed, but also not terrible to change it. Motor oil can definitely go bad in an unsealed container (like a crank case). They're not harming anything by changing it and 8 months is a decent stretch of time regardless of mileage. Sounds like reddit being moronic and using the color of the oil and almost non-usage thinking its still good for another year.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I just follow the interval for severe use in the manual, so every 3000 mi

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I do a 3 month, 3,000 mile interval with Mobil 1 0W-20, only because it's a hard 3 months 3k full of short tripping in the city and cold starts, the oil gets pretty dark right when I'm about to change it.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Every 15000 to 18000 miles

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      so women do go on the internet.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    do you change your oil filter with every oil change, or with every other?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The only correct answer to this is to do an oil analysis test and verify the oil viscosity after a certain period of mileage. Some cars might shear the oil and lose viscosity earlier than others due to a higher compression or more high stress use.
      For me, its an ester based oil in my high compression NA engine, high in moly and zinc(running straight pipes), as I'm already at 280k miles and live in a colder climate. Compression test indicates a very small loss over FSM specifications.

      Depends on what your filter calls for.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    6 months or 7500 miles on amsoil. Shit still comes out new.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I just wait for my car to burn thru enough oil to throw the light on then I just fill 'er up. Usually happens once or twice a year

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    once a month

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not going a mile past 3k on my stupid ass wrx I flog around town

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Same, those people claiming 10,000 mile or more oil changes must be driving like their 80 years old, because if you actually drive something, it's gonna contaminate the oil, maybe even consume a tiny bit every 1000 if you really beat it up.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    When you start feeling guilty about not changing it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That’s realistically okay but for me it is around Christmas and the 4th of July.

      Alright, or the fourth, not and.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >be me full synthetic
    >been 13 months since my last change

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Generally follow the service advise of the car when its new, and during the normal (10 year, 200k km life span) of most cars. When you get older or higher distances maybe consider more frequent changes. If you are a hard driver with a lot of full throttle changes you may also want to change it more regularly. If you have concerns after mechanical failures, or other issues maybe get it analyzed. I check oil level every time I get fuel.

    On my 80's 4 pot:
    15w40 (summer) 10w30(winter) with high ZDDP as its solid followers every 6k Km or 6 months. I replace the filter at this time as its cheap to do so. I use non synthetic for this purpose. Factory Service interval is 7500km for oil and every other oil change for filter. 363k on the clock. This car lives mostly above 4k rpm, and does get some fuel accumulation in the oil thanks to batch fire EFI. I run a 1:125 Premix if I intend to flog it for all its worth or for winter storage. I do not run synthetic as for whatever reason it seems to make an ashy deposit on the plugs/02 sensor + it seems to weep out of the cork pan gasket...and distributor oring even with new ones.

    On my 90's Turbo 6:
    5w40 (summer) / 5w30(winter) "full" synthetic with an additional ZDDP additive since its direct cam on bucket. I replace the filter at this time as well. Every 6k or 6 months. Factory service interval is 10k km for both, though I do not like pushing that long, especially as cheap as oil and a filter are. 75k km on the clock. I tend to drive this like grandma and keep out of boost most of the time so I do not seem to accumulate fuel in the oil.

    Both are cat-less due to age and no longer needing to pass emissions, reduced restriction resulted in real world economy gains on the 80's shit box, but really only changed the smell of the fumes on the 90's shit box + results in some minor flames out the tail pipe when the dump opens up.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >with an additional ZDDP additive since its direct cam on bucket

      Even with small, flat tappets on very old V8s, there's no point if there's already at least 1000-1200ppm of ZDDP in the oil.

      It's even dangerous (more wear) when there's too much.

      In a more recent engine, with overhead camshafts, if it's not a low-cost engine designed in China, everything will be fine even with 800ppm.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >there's no point if there's already at least 1000-1200ppm of ZDDP in the oil.
        That's rare anymore though. You have to step into "performance" oils very deliberately. High ZDDP content decreases catalytic converter lifespan, which is why most modern shit doesn't have that much. Stuff that does have high ZDDP content sometimes warns against using it in modern engines or engines with catalytic converters, noting unsuitability for "certain emissions systems" as Valvoline states.

        Mobil 1 beats around the bush nicely:
        >The latest automotive street use engine oils are designed to be compatible with emission control equipment. Mobil 1 Racing oils are formulated with anti‐wear (zinc/phosphorus) chemistries at twice the level of automotive street oils to provide enhanced protection of highly loaded valve train systems found in some race engines. Based on the high level of anti‐wear chemistries, Mobil 1 Racing oils are not recommended for street use.

        Lucas is on the nose though:
        >for muscle, showroom, classic and trophy cars without catalytic converters. Not recommended for passenger car use.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Which bad V6 is it?

          In Europe, all ACEA A3/B4 oils contain more than enough zinc/phosphorus even for a sports car, on the road.

          If a racing car needs much more of this additive, it's because engine speeds are very high and valve springs are very stiff. That the oil heats up a lot and the oil film can break more easily even with a higher HTHS.

          Even long before DLC-coated tappets. Some sports cars used roller lifters, which greatly reduced friction. (Honda K20, Renault F4R...)
          These engines can easily handle oils with less ZDDP (ACEA C3 instead of A3/B4).

          And for my 2010 sports car with modern catalytic converter. As the oil level moves 2mm in 1 year / 10,000km. Even if I used a racing oil with 2000ppm of ZDDP, my catalytic converter would still last a long time. Especially when you see all the modern engines that consume 1L of oil every 1000km, without the catalysts suffering enormously with oil containing 500-800ppm.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >modern engines that consume 1L of oil every 1000km
            >modern engines that consume 1qt every 600 miles
            What trash "modern" engine does this? 30 year old Jap 4-bangers with a half million miles on them don't burn a quart every 600 miles you Euro-trash moron. Everything you said is wrong, maybe you should just keep your mouth shut about shit you don't understand.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            he talks about modern engines, some of which consume a lot of oil (bmw prince engines (mini), vw 1.4tsi/tfsi, psa 1.2 puretech....), and you find an example of a 30yo atmo engine.

            few inaccuracies but everything he said is true

            and i know a few japanese engines that use a lot of oil. i had one: toyota zr

            he's not the stupid one. you are.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Name a modern engine that consumes a quart every 600 miles.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            there are 3 examples in the message you quote
            moron

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >t. moron

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            3 engines that consume a quart every 1000+ miles aren't very good examples of engines that burn a quart every 600.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            An aunt of mine has a new-ish Kia Forte that needs a quart per week. That Gamma GDI is in a lot of Hyundais, too.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I was going to reply but someone else beat me to it.

        https://i.imgur.com/NYRQj5p.jpg

        >there's no point if there's already at least 1000-1200ppm of ZDDP in the oil.
        That's rare anymore though. You have to step into "performance" oils very deliberately. High ZDDP content decreases catalytic converter lifespan, which is why most modern shit doesn't have that much. Stuff that does have high ZDDP content sometimes warns against using it in modern engines or engines with catalytic converters, noting unsuitability for "certain emissions systems" as Valvoline states.

        Mobil 1 beats around the bush nicely:
        >The latest automotive street use engine oils are designed to be compatible with emission control equipment. Mobil 1 Racing oils are formulated with anti‐wear (zinc/phosphorus) chemistries at twice the level of automotive street oils to provide enhanced protection of highly loaded valve train systems found in some race engines. Based on the high level of anti‐wear chemistries, Mobil 1 Racing oils are not recommended for street use.

        Lucas is on the nose though:
        >for muscle, showroom, classic and trophy cars without catalytic converters. Not recommended for passenger car use.

        I do not have cats in either car, the V6 is notorious for engine wear and oil consumption. the i4 requires valve adjustments clearance adjustments every other oil change per the books. I will keep adding extra ZDDP to bring it up to the former level as traditional synthetics (and even diesel oils now) have reduced their content over the years.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I always go 10k on my TDI Golves. I've used Mobil 1 Full Synthetic for ages and they guarantee it for 10k miles, so why not?

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    motul 300v is renowned for its efficiency... and it contains little zinc

    i use motul 300v 10w-60 for my 1993 bmw m3 e36.

    no abnormal camshaft wear

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm trying this out, curious how it'll hold up. Never used Valvoline before

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Unless you send your oil sample to a tester like blackstone labs, how do you know how its holding up by using it or when you change it?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sending oil off to Blackstone is for obsessive people on bob is the oil guy forums. Different brands of oil behave differently, some brands go dark earlier than others, castrol edge takes on a reddish color halfway through it's life which I always thought was weird

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Since you're aware of what Blackstone is and oil enthusiast forums, you should know color of oil doesn't really indicate anything. Boomers have been doing studies, experiments, and projects specifically around oil changing color from a clear amber to dark black and have the evidence that just because its a dark color doesn't mean its time to change it.

          Question still stands, how do you know the condition of the oil? Color alone? Consistency? Smell? Just whatever you happen to think that day?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >and have the evidence that just because its a dark color doesn't mean its time to change it.
            Mercon LV is probably my favorite right now for this, it goes DARK in a hurry, and the deep red you expect of ATF fades to hint of pink. It only takes ~5000 miles in my experience for Mercon LV to look like 100k mile regular ol' ATF. Am Ford so I don't know if this is true for some other brands newer shit, but I'd bet it is.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You're very much overthinking this my man, I just happen to enjoy checking my oil through the course of its life, looking at it, and thinking "huh, neat"

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah I mean there is zero harm in just visually checking it, but as long as you'd agree that a visual inspection of it means very little unless its looking like a chocolate milkshake or glittery mud, the overall color means nothing.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Don't go 5k on Supertech. I know it's highly recommended but my engine chatters running it.
    Pennzoil Platinum is worth the 1 dollar more per quart. Ultra platinum, even better.

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