I'm thinking of getting a motorcycle license, but the only bikes that interest me are big fat v-twin cruisers.

I'm thinking of getting a motorcycle license, but the only bikes that interest me are big fat v-twin cruisers. Are these hard for a beginner to ride?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A lot of people start on them but I think a lot of people today would tell you start on like a Royal Enfield 650 or Honda Rebel 500

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >motorcycle license
    Nothing teaches you how to drive a motorcycle like the threat of jail. Either you outrun the cops and thus learn how to drive a a motorcycle or you die.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i basically did this, started on a 107 fat bob. Its not hard to ride at all but the stakes are higher because its so heavy. Just be decently strong and it shouldnt be a problem. You wont be hitting twisties hard or anything

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    No they are actually easy to ride despite being heavy. Sitting lower to the ground makes you feel in less danger. Particularly if you get the slider bars in the front, it won't even be able to fall over completely. Liking cruisers does make you a closet homosexual though so there's that.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Liking cruisers does make you a closet homosexual though so there's that.
      Well I am doubting my sexuality tbh. I hate women a lot and I've recently had a homosexual dream so...

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Start on a "small" cruiser like a Sportster 883/1200 or a Japanese equivalent like a Yamaha Vstar 650 or Bolt. They're a bit lighter and narrower, plus the engines are made for beginners.

      Huge cruisers are indeed very hard to actually control WELL. Anyone can go down a straight road or gently curving road, but some of the more common accidents will be low-speed incidents. Not worried about those, you say? Probably the #1 motorcycling injuring is foot/ankle frickups from dropping all 700lbs of steel on yourself.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        What this guy said is right:

        Low cruisers are just an inferior design so your agility and ability is going to be limited compared to if you were riding a real bike. The only thing they have going for them is the look, but everything else is worse. They're not even more comfortable than regular bikes because the suspension is shit, and your feet are in front of you so you can't stand up and your spine absorbs every impact. I urge you to just try riding some other kinds of bikes so you realize immediately how bad cruisers are and stop liking them.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Cruiser life best life :p

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          you will never be a real bike

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          you can just say you dont have any relevant experience

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get a bike you want, or get a cheap bike you don't mind thrashing. Both have pros and cons.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Good choice BROTHER

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Big fat v-twins don't have to be big and fat.
    That being said, lots of people start on big fat cruisers. Lots die too. The problem is with middle-aged guys who "rode dirt bikes when I was younger". Don't be like them. Take it seriously, wear a real helmet and be respectful of the fact that your bike won't stop or dodge danger like a sport bike. It's fine, there's a lot to be said for the cruiser life (best life!) if you take it easy on the perfect motorcycle for taking it easy.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you're a burger, do an MSF course. They might have a beat up beginner bike there like pic related. It won't be nearly as heavy or torque-y as a real cruiser but it'll let you see if you like the low, foot forward position of one. After that just hit up a few stealerships and sit on bikes till you find one that's comfortable.

    IMO light- & mid-weight cruisers are decent beginner bikes, especially for women and manlets. The low center of mass and seat height means it'll be easy to keep it upright when you come to a stop.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >The low center of mass and seat height means itll be easy to keep it upright when you come to a stop.
      This isn't even true. The low seat height relative to the center of mass means you have less leverage over the mass which actually makes it feel heavier. Cruisers are low and round and heavy like straddling over a full keg of beer and trying to move it around. Normal bikes have the center of mass in relatively the same place and the seat height much higher which gives you more leverage and makes it feel lighter. The easiest bike for a beginner to control would be the highest seat height that they can still rest both feet flat on the ground.

      I feel that you have never ridden both kinds of bikes because this is really obvious to anyone who has.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >The low seat height relative to the center of mass means you have less leverage over the mass which actually makes it feel heavier
        Unless you're unironically a liftlet, no beginner cruiser like a v star 250 is going to feel heavy to anyone ever.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Do you have any reading comprehension?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    VTwin cruisers are generally pretty forgiving since they've got a more relaxed power band that focuses more on down low torque as opposed to high revving peaky power. I had a Shadow 750 as my first bike and I think they're an excellent choice for that role, 500cc and 650cc parallel twins are also decent choices for a learner bike, imo 125/250/300cc bikes can be a bit too underpowered, even for a beginner, so I would avoid them. Some bikes can be intoxicate you with speed, like they always want you to always go faster and ride more aggressively (it sounds odd until you're actually riding, then it makes complete sense) which in my opinion isn't a good fit for a new rider, your first few years need to be focused on establishing good, responsible riding habits, so that when you do eventually step up to something fun and crazy you're well prepared to deal with it and not have a nice day through stupidity or incompetence. I've got a KTM 990SMT now, which is a wheelie machine that goads you into ripping it at every opportunity, and can certify that I probably would have killed myself on it if I had it as a first bike.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    No, they’re just heavy. You’ll probably drop it one or more times when stopped on uneven terrain. If you were planning on shelling out big bucks on a looker, just get a beater of equivalent size and ride that for a year before you do

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I bet you have skinny arms. Nerd

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They're easier to ride than sport or standards, however those riders tend to be less talented or motivated to improve their skills in my experience.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    do yourself a huge favor- taker the MOST ( Motorcycle Operators Safety Course ) and learn properly. That is what I did and rode my first bike, a 730 pound Road King. I was a good rider and never got in trouble, I just did what they taught us.
    Do this and you will be fine !

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    PS - what you dont know until you ride these bikes is that they are surprisingly nimble once they start rolling.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Are they hard to ride
    No they are probably the easiest, remember these are for fat ass boomers.
    If you want to actually get good at riding a motorcycle, buy yourself a cheap duel sport or dirt bike like a 250, or a DRZ400 and then go trail riding and learn to ride in the dirt, the mud, slate, gravel, rocks. Shit like that.
    If you can ride a dirt bike through all that kinda shit driving on the road is a piece of cake. It will train you to be far more better at balancing and controlling a bike.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Robbie Kneivel rode dirt bikes for hours and hours to train for his jumps. He said they very same thing.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >motorcycle license
    I've been riding dirty for 25 years. Part of me says I should just go ahead and get the stupid endorsement, and another part of me says that I haven't needed it so far so why bother?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      When I took the msf course 3 or 4 out of 10 were like you. That was 9 years ago.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The motorcycle endorsement is theoretically for your safety, not other people. If you truly won't learn anything from taking the course then there is no reason to do it.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I’ve had two Dyna Fat Bobs actually and they’ve been great. The Dyna platform is amazing and it’s shame that Harley killed it off. First one was a 2010 with a 96 twin cam and my current is a 2013 with the 103. By Harley standards they’re a light bike with the big motor, I’ve got basic bolt-ons with a tune and it runs mid 12s so it’s got plenty of oomph for around town. They’re not sport bikes and other manufacturers have a bunch more power but I love mine. Great for around town but I don’t particularly car for long rides as it’s not set up for that. If it’s a first bike, just be prepared to drop it eventually so maybe get one with crash bars to make that a little more bearable.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    just start on a rebel 250 or something until you can easily do every low speed maneuver without ever having to panic and put your feet down to stop yourself from falling over

  18. 2 months ago
    Hotwing

    HYB

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