Is it true that automakers are making trash v6 twin turbo truck engines that won't last?

Is it true that automakers are making trash v6 twin turbo truck engines that won't last? Are 2021 Toyota Tundra's the last v8s worth getting? Or are the criticisms of twin turbos exaggerated?

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

Yakub: World's Greatest Dad Shirt $21.68

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's nothing inherently unreliable about a turbo engine. Semi trucks all have turbos and regularly tick over a million miles.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      they're also 800 lb iron blocks with no spark plugs.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      they're engineered to last 750k miles. your ecoboost or whatever shitbox is engineered to last 1 day outside of the powertrain warranty period.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      1.) They're turbo DIESELS
      2.) They are inherently overbuilt blocks because they're diesels
      3.) They are large displacement engines, usually 12-17L which allows far greater torque values at lower RPMs unlike smaller displacement gasoline engines that need to rev higher
      4.) Twin turbos on small displacement gasoline engines run at very high pressures comparatively, and require the blocks to be overbuilt - which they're usually not.
      5.) They are a consumer grade product, not built to last a million miles like an industrial turbo diesel engine; they don't need to last a million miles because consoomers are conditioned to buy a new truck every 5 years or less.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >RPMs unlike smaller displacement gasoline engines that need to rev higher
        Peak power and peak torque are a matter of bore and stroke ratio along with engine layout. Its not a displacement issue. Displacement only increases the ceiling for producing power along with adding longevity to the smaller wearing components by literally adding material to them through size. 10mm of metal always wears through slower than 5mm. Metallurgy has been progressing nonstop though, so its fair to say a 3.5L can now comfortably handle the load of a 7.0L 30 years ago without an issue. Its just a matter of how cheap the manufacturer makes the seals and where they're sourcing materials from. Pickrel makes more torque lower down than most big displacement v6's they put in mid sizes/base model full sizes. Also a 3.5 ecoboost f150 makes 500tq @ 3100rpm

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >10mm of metal always wears through slower than 5mm.
          All things being equal is the operative qualifier.
          A lesser-quality oiling and cooling system can affect that wear rate
          > Its just a matter of how cheap the manufacturer makes the seals and where they're sourcing materials from.
          This seems to be the Primary issue.(as always)
          Power and Torque per liter has long ago seen impressive milestones (see exotic WW2 engine design, on both sides).
          Hell, even Group B produced unparalleled Power.
          The bullshit "muh Emissions" and Durability have always been the sticking points.

        • 1 month ago
          p

          Crazy how metallurgy only improved for FI engines and not NA…

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Idiotic comparison

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >the criticisms of twin turbos exaggerated

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Naturally aspirated > turboslop

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes they are, turbos are cheaper to make power with compared to using NA engines even though they are unreliable, and, if not Subaru turbo engines, can give better fuel economy than NA V6 engines. It's the unfortunate case in which shitty regulation that always wants higher MPG's is fricking over car reliability

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Nissan V8 tops the Toyota V8 and I’m tired of pretending that it doesn’t.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nissan actually invested in the engine and transmissions for their trucks. I'm actually surprised by this. Guy I knows Titan has over 300k on it and it's still going. I keep thinking about the Frontier but the gas mileage on the older models has me...interested.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sorry I mean to say "UNinterested".

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Are 2021 Toyota Tundra's the last v8s worth getting?
    I generally give zero fricks about fuel economy in any vehicle but those Tundras are just too fricking thirsty. Even if they do "last forever" you're still going to spend an entire new truck worth of fuel to drive it to that forever. If that engine was making 700hp the mileage would be acceptable but when it barely feels more powerful than a 5.3 it's just not worth it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      not trying to dickride toyota, but they are definitely more powerful than a 5.3.
      it is thirsty, but if you behave and do 75 on the highway, it ain't so bad.
      the real problem with nu-toyota is how much they beep and squal about everything. ridiculous coming from gm products and you have to put your foot on the brake to start the vehicle
      one thing about the nu-tundra is it should be better in the suspension department. I have not driven one, but they have a fully boxed frame now. the last gen was a little sloppy if that matters to you. not that it really matters on a 20' barge.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >japanese truck
    You know Ford and GM are still making V8 trucks right? And they’re unironically better in every metric.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They're so much better it literally (literally) killed the Titan XD Cummins.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    v6's now get more torque than v8's did a few years ago and get way better mileage. This is like the least worst thing about new trucks. If you need shitloads of torque, get a v8 turbo diesel, but I think the new v6's are fine for most people (even towing/hauling most things)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sure. My concern is reliability/longevity with twin turbo v6 engine.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >same displacement but...
    >make more power!
    Why is turbo anything but based as frick?

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes its true. Get the naturally aspirated Tundra V8 if you want the Tundra. Turbogasoline engines never are so reliable engines like naturally aspirated gasoline engines, turbodiesel engines.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      But I like the new modern trim(s) of the 2022+.
      The frick do I do?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Of the nu-motors the V6 turbos are the least offensive, the garbage 2.x Liter engines that Ford and Toyota are making are a disgrace.
    overstressed engines that won't last a 100k miles.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >the garbage 2.x Liter engines that Ford and Toyota are making are a disgrace.
      Did you mean Toyota here? Or did you mean another company?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >overstressed engines that won't last a 100k miles.
      This might be true if they were running around at max load and full boost at the time, but they aren't. Compression is what really stresses motors and the magic of a turbo is that it's only high compression for the tiny percentage of the time that you actually need the power, i.e. when accelerating hard or towing/hauling heavy. For the 99% of the time that's spent cruising off boost at consistent speeds those small turbo motors are only about 9.5:1, meanwhile their modern N/A equivalents are always at 11:1 or higher (last-gen Tacoma V6 was almost 12:1 because that's a function of piston and cylinder geometry and that means that, the vast majority of the time, modern N/A engines are actually MORE stressed than modern DI turbos.

      If you're using a truck as a daily tow rig, especially in urban or mountain environments, the story might be different because you'll be on boost a lot more often with a turbo, but for a normal person who only tows and hauls occasionally the turbo makes a lot of sense and will likely last as long as the rest of the truck does.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Actually, I should amend this, the other part of stress is RPM, and that's also an advantage for turbos because they make peak torque really low.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >modern N/A engines are actually MORE stressed than modern DI turbos.
        False information from you.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So then why are they lasting much longer than 100k miles regularly without issue? The Ford 2.7 has been around for 9 years now, they seem to be above average for reliability, even at high mileage.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >they seem to be above average for reliability, even at high mileage.
        Yet every Ford tech I know or have talked to wouldn't touch one with a 50 foot pole. Hmmm.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Familiarity breeds contempt. There’s millions of these things out there, it is probably the most common F150 engine of the past decade. Of course you’ll see a lot in the shop, there’s a shit ton of them.
          Plenty of mechanics hate the Chevy and RAM V8s too, it doesn’t mean they’re bad.
          The legendary 300 I6 had stupid phenolic timing gears and just enough horsepower to pull a spaghetti noodle out of a cats ass. The rear main seal liked to leak too. Of course everyone looks at that thing with rose colored glasses, but the 2.7 is a way, way better engine and will last just as long or longer.
          Mine frequently has a trailer on it and I just change the oil and give it gas.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *