Just hit my 10th year as an engineer in the auto industry, ask me anything.

Just hit my 10th year as an engineer in the auto industry, ask me anything. Won't go too deep into what I do or who I work(ed) for but roughly, I do software integration between chassis and ADAS controllers so I know a fair amount about most systems aside from paint, trim and whatnot.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I very much want to put together a car like your pic related.

    Will everything just wear out in a year if I do this?

    I want to daily drive this during the week, then very fast on dirt roads a few times a month

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If you wanted it to not fall apart you would be better off doing a body swap onto a chassis/drivetrain with the same wheelbase and track width that makes sense that already works, so something like an Eagle SX4. If you try to modify the E24 chassis, yeah it will just fall apart, either because you don't know what you are doing, or you kind of do, but in that case, you will likely overbuild the stuff you make and keep chasing around breakages on the stuff you didn't modify.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I am currently doing a lot of welding on the underbody of my e36.
        I also own a lifted R50 pathfinder that uses a similar suspension setup as the BMWs ( mcds in the front and trailing arm in the back)

        couldn't I just weld a sort of square tube frame beneath a bmw, cross brace the strut towers and lift it with spacers like the R50 ?

        I reckon the answer is no, but can someone explain why ?

        pic unrelated but in about a year Ill either do a moderate rally build on the e36 or get a 944 for the same plan.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      go out and buy a demolition car and see for yourself.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      lifted cars are pretty dumb unless you build something full custom. fricked suspension geo, no droop, not good for anything, less capable than a stock jeep.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Hauling ass on a dirt road in a car instead of a truck is an amazing feeling

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          There are cars built for that and they don't look like jacked up car trucks

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I want to daily drive this during the week, then very fast on dirt roads a few times a month
      Just get yourself an old Subie, this is what they were built for

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Can I lift that and put big beefy tires on?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Not really. They are 4 cylinders geared for regular tires, so you will burn out the transmission and lug the engine if you oversize the tires too much. Also will put more stress on the steering and suspension parts. MPG will also go to shit. Might as well start with a truck /SUV

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Might as well start with a truck /SUV
            Not nearly as cool or fun

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            heh it looks like it's spraying cum out of the back

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Not nearly as cool or fun
            That's where you're wrong

            Dual Air conditioners in this b***h. The trunk works as a refrigerator. Also it does 0-60 in 8 seconds unlike a Subaru with oversized tires

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            top heavy
            heavy
            not nimble

            trail car is more fun

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I was responding to the poast about a Subaru with oversized tires, those aren't fun. They are super slow and handle poorly. Unless you spend $10k + in mods. My gmt400 can just hit the trails

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Is planned obsolesce a goal or something that happens due to budgetary reason.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Well, no car is going to be optimized for the 4th owner at 300k miles because that will add a lot of cost to the vehicle MSRP, so it's just inevitable that decisions are made considering the warranty period and in some cases for emissions/safety, longer periods of time like 10-12 years as there is precedence for recalls and warranty extensions for certain problems outside of warranty (see Mercedes/Bosch SBC brakes). Nobody is conspiring to strategically make things fail though. Cars made today last longer than ever despite what people may say, and also last quite long for how much tech is loaded into them, compare a 10 year old S class to a 10 year old phone, 10 year old laptop, etc., S class is aged a bit sure but is still quite a vehicle where all those other tech devices are basically past end of life.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Well, no car is going to be optimized for the 4th owner at 300k miles because that will add a lot of cost to the vehicle MSRP

        Frick you too. If it costs an extra 20% for the first owner so that I can have a nice reliable $1500 car in 15 years you need to make that happen. First owners love to over pay for shit.

        Besides, it would actually be cheaper cause you would have far less warranty work and fewer recalls.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah your intuition is probably correct, we don't really look at data for all these costs and market sentiment and whatnot anyway we just were doing it on pure feel. I'll suggest making all of our vehicles 20% more expensive tomorrow because it would "actually be cheaper".

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Dumb ass engineer.
            There were cars built 30+ years ago that didnt rust out and break during regular use. - checker cabs, volvo p1800, pretty much any 90s japanese car. So instead of designing new shit, just make a 90s Lexus with a couple of mods like ZF8HP transmission, backup camera and remote start

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Cars are lasting longer than ever by every measure. You would not buy that car you described, because you have no money, so you would be an especially bad demographic to design a car for. This is the actual reason you don't like any new cars, they would never be built with your likes in mind for that very obvious reason.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I have the money, but the new cars suck so I drive older stuff with upgrades. You have flawed reasoning. Also, 90s/ 00s cars are lasting longer than ever because people are doing major maintenance and upgrades cause new cars suck. Also financing is involved.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not the OP, but even if you personally have money, it doesn't matter. Most people like you don't. So the car manufacturers design cars for people who, as a segment both have money and are willing to buy new cars. You may not like it, but that is simply how the market works.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >more time passes
            >cars get older on average

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            https://i.imgur.com/buDufFw.jpeg

            Cars are lasting longer than ever by every measure. You would not buy that car you described, because you have no money, so you would be an especially bad demographic to design a car for. This is the actual reason you don't like any new cars, they would never be built with your likes in mind for that very obvious reason.

            I should extend your question to an FAQ though to save some time
            >why isn't every new car an E63S AMG Wagon with milk crate seats, no driver aids, and no screens?
            >why isn't every new car a Hilux?
            >why isn't every new car a 12v Cummins Subaru Brat?
            See above

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I have a Blackberry Z10 and an Acer laptop from 2013 which still works great. Naturally they're overwhelmed by today's hardware requirements but they haven't fallen apart unlike an old S-class.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          love my blackberry q10 special edition but at&t are Black folk and made it essentially not work for calling and texting even though its 4g. shit sucks, so i had to buy a used $30 motorola from ebay

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How's the work environment? I had a choice many years ago between aerospace and automotive and chose aerospace because I am a pilot, plus I heard automotive involved more long hours and weekends than what I do. Seeing what has happened to cars since I graduated college 12 years ago I am happy with where I am, though the pay could be better.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Every company is different just like in aerospace, and every engineering discipline is also a bit different. If you're pure mech E, aerospace is probably better salarywise. I do work with people formerly from aerospace (mostly from Lockheed and Northrop Grumman) and they all seem to prefer the auto work because the pace is much faster, but those companies are sort of in their own bubble so I don't know how to compare them to a place like Airbus.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        My undergrad was aerospace but my masters was in mechanical engineering.

        >and they all seem to prefer the auto work because the pace is much faster
        Sounds about right. I do contract work for a major jet engine manufacturer and a rocket engine manufacturer since my work is all on turbines. The jet engine work is nice and slow. There's so much bureaucracy in those companies and the regulatory approvals that it slows everything way down. I work to live I don't live to work so I deliberately avoid "fast paced" work so that I don't wind up working 50-60 hour weeks.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How prevalent is model based design in ECU software teams?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I've heard this term used interchangeably for a few different things so not 100% sure I'm addressing your question, but if you mean a physics plausibility model that's developed outside of what's deployed on the ECU for something like stability control or trailer sway, then deployed to the ECU as a binary that just provides the outputs determined by the math in the offline development, that's how almost everything works these days.

      When exactly was the moment you started hating cars?

      That's actually why I ended up focusing on ADAS stuff primarily, so in my off time I work on and enjoy cars that don't have any of that without getting burnt out.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm talking more about the codebase. Is it entirely in C or have you witnessed a lot of teams using model based design tools like Simulink

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          If you mean the codebase(s) at large that power all of the development of let's say stability control, that encompasses code that runs on powerful workstations or servers that does in depth physics simulation, regression testing, dyno/HIL testing, data gathering from metrology equipment on development vehicles, etc., that's written in all sorts of stuff, some more esoteric than others depending on the size and experience of the team, c++, python, scala, most commonly where I've worked, and mostly bespoke implementations. Looking at simulink, I don't recall ever seeing it, but it's possible it's used and I wouldn't recognize it in the codebase if it compiles to some markdown file or into actual working code. That's generally the problem with these node based codeless tools, what they generate is not easily reviewed or unit tested (maybe Matlab addressed this with that tool though, I have no idea). Everything that is actually run on an ECU is in C.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah the MATLAB stuff gets generated into C. Its actually what I do: I do a lot of application level (AUTOSAR) control software for ECUs and I'm wondering if maybe I'm pigeon holing myself a bit too much by putting all my eggs into the Simulink basket. I know GM uses it extensively along with a lot of Tier 1 suppliers, but who knows if it's here to stay or not. I definitely prefer it significantly over line by line coding in C for developing advanced control systems.

            What has been your favorite/most interesting ECU to work on? I've dabbled in body controls and BMS (on EVs)

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    When exactly was the moment you started hating cars?

  6. 1 month ago
    Schooler

    I want to build my own V12 below 2.5 liters. I am in school right now about to plan out my major, just doing prerequisite courses. Would mechanical engineering get me in this direction or is there a more specific type of degree I should look for?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Look for something that will make you a lot of money because you won't build that on a young engineer's salary. The custom crankshaft alone will cost you half your salary.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What are your favorite cars? Also, what was your degree? I am studying aerospace engineering myself.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Big GTs, E24, E31, 550 Maranello. I don't have a degree, I got into it by being an engineering technician first working on this stuff at proving grounds. In the US, which degree you have doesn't really matter that much after your first job. I work with people that got degrees in aerospace, it's definitely not going to hamper you.

      how much of my data is being sold to insurance companies or other entities? Who are these other entities? is there any way I can avoid this short of driving old dumb shitboxes?

      With your name or anything to associate you directly (VIN, payment info, etc.), none, if the manufacturer sells cars in Europe or California. Data like that these days is like storing toxic waste, not worth it for any manufacturer.

      How much do you make?

      What do you get out of Siemens acoustic data coupled with Cosworth?

      Why is HALO $70 a minute to run?

      ~275k. The quality of data going into a model has a massive impact on the quality of the model, so it's really not too surprising that specialty metrology and sensing, and oddball software that only a few hundred people really use, is stupid expensive, but worth it.

      why has honda never made a good car?

      Like most Japanese manufacturers, they neither make great cars or terrible cars, because their entire ethos is refining the process rather than the product, to a degree where bad decisions cannot be made. However, high risk decisions are required to make any car that's an outlier (on either side of the spectrum).

      >more time passes
      >cars get older on average

      This isn't hard to even see, how many 60s Biscaynes were still being driven in the 80s (none), how many Chrysler K cars were being driven in the early 00s (almost none), how many gen 2 Priuses are being driven today (still one of the most common cars on the road).

      Yeah the MATLAB stuff gets generated into C. Its actually what I do: I do a lot of application level (AUTOSAR) control software for ECUs and I'm wondering if maybe I'm pigeon holing myself a bit too much by putting all my eggs into the Simulink basket. I know GM uses it extensively along with a lot of Tier 1 suppliers, but who knows if it's here to stay or not. I definitely prefer it significantly over line by line coding in C for developing advanced control systems.

      What has been your favorite/most interesting ECU to work on? I've dabbled in body controls and BMS (on EVs)

      Camera related stuff by far, way more compute available because it's required so there's way more room for novel solutions to problems. I assume you are still having to figure out difficult architectural decisions to maintain performance and creating testable and readable code somehow, so I wouldn't worry about being pigeonholed, knowing the syntax of X language doesn't really matter much unless you are trying to get hired with little experience.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    how much of my data is being sold to insurance companies or other entities? Who are these other entities? is there any way I can avoid this short of driving old dumb shitboxes?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I can't speak for the whole industry but it would shock me if any big name manufacturer was selling a single byte of data to insurance companies. It simply isn't done. Data is super valuable for R&D and analysis purposes so it would be quite shocking to see a big manufacturer being so desperate for cash that they would sell to insurance companies. Maybe smaller, more desperate companies like Vinfast or Fisker might do that shit but even then... It's simply not a needle mover

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How much do you make?

    What do you get out of Siemens acoustic data coupled with Cosworth?

    Why is HALO $70 a minute to run?

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why has honda never made a good car?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hi, I'm also an engineer and I'm 100% sure I was OP's direct boss exactly three years ago (before I fired him for incompetence and harassment). You can ask me whatever you want, I'm much better than him in all metrics.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nice try, no good engineer would ever become a manager though

      what would procurement be

      OP here, I'll explain his job
      >gets spec from engineers
      >talks to salesmen from suppliers to meet spec
      >the supplier tells them they are the best ever and can do anything
      >signs a contract
      >the parts don't actually work
      >OP tries to talk to the same salesmen
      >neither OP nor the salesmen even know what a car is so can't figure anything out
      >they decide everything is OK
      >after many useless meetings, engineers get in the room together
      >argue about specs
      >tell OP he needs to charge the supplier back because their shit is garbage
      >he doesn't want to do it because he thinks he got a good a deal from the supplier and any friction at all will reduce "future good deals" (getting scammed again by the same salesmen)

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        you forgot the part where the reason the parts don't work in the first place is because you gave the supplier incomplete CAD data without a 2d drawing that was a reference model from a 10 year old design in the first place

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >you should have told us you wanted to make something that actually worked, we were just following instruction!
          Ahh yes, thanks for summarizing every interaction ever with a purchaser and supplier

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            not their fault your friends in chassis and your other friends in powertrain made 5 engineering changes without consulting with each other and now none of your shit fits either.
            >don't worry, we'll hold another internal workshop about how procurement can make engineering changes faster and cheaper instead of just designing it right the first time

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Funny enough I've been the Salesman in that scenario, your dumbfrick procurement guy asked us for a part with negative weight, and then took our "get the frick out of my office" price for it. Don't blame me.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not OP, but I worked in procurement for 3 different OEMs for 10 years if anyone's interested in that side of things.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what would procurement be

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        direct materials; I did wheel/tire, IP, HVAC, ADAS, nav, seating, a bunch of stuff.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Not OP, but I worked in procurement for 3 different OEMs for 10 years if anyone's interested in that side of things.

          What is the difference in price between leather and cloth seats?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Why is marketing trying to make vegan leather (read:vynil) out to be some kind of luxury feature?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Cause its cheap and stupid people will pay extra for it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Who actually decides the character of a car? Does a single person say/approve everything that goes into 1 model or is there a board with the heads of each department all compromising

        How much say do the technical guys have in the direction of a car?

        How much of designing a new car is just gluing suppliers parts together as best you can?

        is it truly cheaper to fully equip every single car at the highest trim than build each by varying trims to order

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It depends on the company, there's a few groups that design a car
          1. The people that do the A surface design/interior ergonomics
          2. Marketers (we need x cu. ft. trunk space and y 0-60 to compete in this segment type stuff)
          3. Manufacturing/materials - people who actually know what it will cost to do something in dollars and time
          4. Engineers - the people that actually know how to design a working car

          At a company like Toyota, manufacturing is in charge, they can tell the A surface designers and modellers that they need to make a frick ugly part line and a liftgate that doesn't fit an American in it and that's the way it's going to be. A company like Alfa Romeo is going to be different, you can see just looking at the car that they prioritize design.

          The common language is just cost - anything is possible as long as it doesn't violate the laws of physics, you just need money, engineering/manufacturing often just says "sure we can do that it will cost this and add this to cycle time, or we can do this (actually good process) if you make these changes to the A surface/performance specs/etc.

          How much is sourced from tier 1 suppliers also varies by brand quite a lot, and sometimes model to model (a 911 has a lot more in house stuff than a Macan for instance)

          >ask me anything.

          What program do mechanics use to service your car on their computers?
          How do I obtain said program/OS?

          If I wanted to buy a Chevy Silverado 1500 Trail Boss 6.2L v8, would this be a truck that lasts? I've always wanted a truck and I have 2 kids and a wife. I don't want a fricking van, lol.

          For development, a lot of the Kvaser suite of tools (CANalyzer, CANape). All of the 1/2 ton domestic trucks are good, just drive them all and pick the one you think drives the best.

          https://i.imgur.com/bcxT2PR.jpeg

          I am currently doing a lot of welding on the underbody of my e36.
          I also own a lifted R50 pathfinder that uses a similar suspension setup as the BMWs ( mcds in the front and trailing arm in the back)

          couldn't I just weld a sort of square tube frame beneath a bmw, cross brace the strut towers and lift it with spacers like the R50 ?

          I reckon the answer is no, but can someone explain why ?

          pic unrelated but in about a year Ill either do a moderate rally build on the e36 or get a 944 for the same plan.

          I touched on this here

          If you wanted it to not fall apart you would be better off doing a body swap onto a chassis/drivetrain with the same wheelbase and track width that makes sense that already works, so something like an Eagle SX4. If you try to modify the E24 chassis, yeah it will just fall apart, either because you don't know what you are doing, or you kind of do, but in that case, you will likely overbuild the stuff you make and keep chasing around breakages on the stuff you didn't modify.

          In this style of building everything from mild steel and sleeving/boxing stuff all over the place, you are guaranteed to massively overbuild things and cause failures elsewhere. Either you will be putting the unibody through hell, or everything will be so strong that the car will be way too heavy and stiff for what is is and destroy thing like knuckles and suspension bushings.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >who I work(ed) for
    Shelby American.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >ask me anything.

    What program do mechanics use to service your car on their computers?
    How do I obtain said program/OS?

    If I wanted to buy a Chevy Silverado 1500 Trail Boss 6.2L v8, would this be a truck that lasts? I've always wanted a truck and I have 2 kids and a wife. I don't want a fricking van, lol.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Which automakers are the most and least vertically integrated?

    no tesla

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't really know for sure, but my guess would be most - Toyota, least - the smaller Stellantis brands like Maserati and Alfa. Some of the suppliers it's hard to really know how the development is really split like Toyota/Denso, GM/Aptiv, etc. I would consider some of those to be like a tier .5 supplier almost rather than a company that just buys a complete ESP system from Bosch or something like that.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Neat seeing any shift towards vertical inegration recently?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Not really, it kind of needs to happen all at once which I'll explain in this other anon's question

          Not really car related but I had a similar opportunity to yours years ago:
          Background from school? EE or Computer Engineering? Neither? Does it pay well?
          I currently work on embedded devices (RTOS) for process automation/power generation controls and while I love the work, I also would love to combine the work with a field I love too.

          I explained above but I was a technician first for many years and have no degree. It pays well but not as much as working on something like the android kernel which is probably easier and you don't have to worry about accidentally injuring people.

          Do you think that the industry is ever going to be able to ditch CAN for automotive ethernet, and bespoke ASICs for ECUs in favor of running software on generic SoCs that can failover to each other for redundancy. I know that Tesla tried ditching CAN entirely for the Y, but that didn't work out. Was the problem latency, stability, or something else? With software-defined vehicles, are they running some form of application orchestration like Kubernetes? Am wondering because I'm curious about the progress on that front in automotive-land. I've been in energy for the past few years and it seems like SCADA is going to be around for the next 500 years

          CAN has to go, it's basically maxed out, the solutions you see to keep it going and the size and count of busses on some vehicle is completely ridiculous. The problem is the new solutions have to happen all at once, and other than Tesla, every brand is completely reliant on suppliers to do it. A supplier like Bosch that could make these systems could easily pull it off, but they move at glacial pace and probably won't tolerate the risk of hoping a bunch of brands will jump on it while eating a massive development cost. From the stuff I've seen like this, nothing like kubernetes, just tons of small c++ state machines and function libraries. Even though there's a lot more compute and storage available compared to most controllers, it's still a car, it has to be as simple as possible and security is extremely important if there's a connection to the internet, cell, paired to the user device, or even a gateway through the OBD or ethernet port.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not really car related but I had a similar opportunity to yours years ago:
    Background from school? EE or Computer Engineering? Neither? Does it pay well?
    I currently work on embedded devices (RTOS) for process automation/power generation controls and while I love the work, I also would love to combine the work with a field I love too.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do you think that the industry is ever going to be able to ditch CAN for automotive ethernet, and bespoke ASICs for ECUs in favor of running software on generic SoCs that can failover to each other for redundancy. I know that Tesla tried ditching CAN entirely for the Y, but that didn't work out. Was the problem latency, stability, or something else? With software-defined vehicles, are they running some form of application orchestration like Kubernetes? Am wondering because I'm curious about the progress on that front in automotive-land. I've been in energy for the past few years and it seems like SCADA is going to be around for the next 500 years

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What do I need to do to disable your car's telemetry in it's entirety?

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    is the auto industry actually fast paced in terms of developing and implementing new technology and design or is it deceiving because of carryover from previous product generations? I imagine for like Toyota a new gen corolla isn't all-new because they'll want to reuse tooling, reliability data, certification, etc. coming from commerical aero where implementation is slow, auto industry sounds more fun, but idk if that's true of only smaller automakers or certain divisions within a company

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah there's lots of carryover of course especially at a company like Toyota, but new stuff is being developed all the time, and the time windows are short because with new stuff you also can't just make 25k test mules and drive them for 3 years, so it takes a lot of creative and novel work to make new automotive tech that is also reliable and safe. The certification/homologation requirements are nothing like aero, they aren't really that bad at all especially on the software side.

      I work as a senior firmware engineer writing C code for high performance radios. How difficult would it be to break into ECU development? How about doing it on my own? I managed to change the color code on an airbag control module by dumping the EEPROM and flashing it to a used part. That got me interested in actually writing/reverse engineering the firmware that runs on the ECU to parse the data in the EEPROM.

      Yeah if you ship production C code that real people actual use on consumer electronics you are already a rare breed, you could pivot to automotive.

      When/why did cars give up on improving ride quality? mid 70s?

      I'm thinking of buying some old american bloatmax barge instead of a newish S class, add sound insulation and you have a better cruiser which is way cooler. I don't care about corners or handling i just want a fricking hovercraft. To make it easier im hoping to get the most modern barge before ride comfort started going downhil.

      Ride quality is great right now, you been in something like a new S Class or CT5V Blackwing? For ride quality where you can't feel anything on the road, you should look at an early 80s Bentley or Rolls with the hydraulic suspension or a Citroen with their hydropneumatic system - nothing drives like those cars to this day (just don't go around a turn at any kind of speed). 70s American barges do not ride well, go actually drive one and you will be let down.

      If trucks and power are popular now why isn't there more 2dr cars with beds like american utes of old. People would love them for ride height alone.

      Chicken tax and fleet MPG rules make small trucks and cars with pickup beds impossible to sell in the US

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I work as a senior firmware engineer writing C code for high performance radios. How difficult would it be to break into ECU development? How about doing it on my own? I managed to change the color code on an airbag control module by dumping the EEPROM and flashing it to a used part. That got me interested in actually writing/reverse engineering the firmware that runs on the ECU to parse the data in the EEPROM.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    When/why did cars give up on improving ride quality? mid 70s?

    I'm thinking of buying some old american bloatmax barge instead of a newish S class, add sound insulation and you have a better cruiser which is way cooler. I don't care about corners or handling i just want a fricking hovercraft. To make it easier im hoping to get the most modern barge before ride comfort started going downhil.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      My grandpa had a mid 70s buick LeSabre it was actually pretty quiet. Very gomfy car. Wouldn't need much improvement to remain comfy

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i want to believe this photo is real

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You think its not?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        it could be real, then again, it could not be real

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If trucks and power are popular now why isn't there more 2dr cars with beds like american utes of old. People would love them for ride height alone.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nah, gotta have 4 doors and a cover. It rains alot and you dont want subhumans helping themselves to the contents of your truck bed. you see pickups never have anything in them cause it will be rained on or stolen. Fast food and groceries have to stay in the cab. So makes more sense to drive a Crossover unless you want to impose wasteful status. Only poorgays actually use them to haul shit. And poorgays would prefer not to buy a new truck, so that market is driven by debtgays

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >only poor people have dedicated non street legal racecars, boats, and off-road vehicles
        the latest poor gay cope is kinda sad. I'm laughing but I feel bad about it...

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    explain the vehicle in picrel. obviously a very customized sixer. is it real or AI? are there videos of this car on the trails? if it is real, what are the specs? etcetera so forth and so on...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      nvm, chances are it's just a well done render

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