Need a car for Iceland

I will be in Iceland for 1 full year on a project.

I need to get a car or take a car with me. I am thinking of a Lada Niva 4x4 as they look amazing and probably work well with the 4x4.

But does anyone have any reql actual advice from driving or type of car to get for a country like Iceland.

A ferry is available from mainland Europe to take a car with me.

Is Toyota possibly more reliable?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >any russian car
    >reliable
    corners were already cut even before it left the factory

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My beloved OP, you should get yourself an arctic truck. They're the only way to properly get around in Iceland.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ive seen these trucks with air hoses running to the wheels and adjustable locking diffs. They stop and either lock or unlock the diff when going off main road and decrease tyre pressure (I think)
      Can some anon explain

      Also if anyone can explain the need for low and high 4x4 when off road.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Of course toyota is going to be more reliable than a Niva, but I don't think it will be as DIYable what's with all their fancy electronics and shit, if we're talking new cars that is.
    Older land cruisers and datsun patrols are big, heavy trucks and their 4X4 is a bit meh compared to the Niva as the Euro models are all open diff. The Niva at least has a lockable center differential from the factory.
    On the other hand the japcrap is body on frame and can take a proper beating, the Niva is a crossover and kinda flimsy. The engines also leave a lot to be desired, they're pretty much all underpowered sub 2 litre 4 bangers making like 100hp at the very best.
    That's okay for getting about, but any kind of serious offroading and you're going to be lacking torque.
    Meanwhile the japcrap has big boy turbodiesel sixer options, so they can both get about and over stuff with just brute force, will probably use less fuel too than the Niva, which is a very thirsty shitbox due to the lack of torque.
    Honestly I'd consider either the japcrap or a Suzuki Jimny instead, unless money is an issue then the Niva can't be beat.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lada being reliable is a meme, they have always been extremely prone to various problems and breakdowns. Their one saving grace is that you can repair them easily

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >shit reliability
    >low quality replacement parts
    >all EFI replacement sensors after 2022 are basically chinkshit that works about couple months

    Imagine considering buying this shit in the west when you have huge selections of second hand REAL cars under 5-10k euros, hahaha lmao, are you people moronic or what?

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Never been to Iceland but I'm pretty sure they have paved roads OP. Unless your project involves traversing the wilderness then that's different.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I am thinking of a Lada Niva 4x4
    homie...

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jimny is the Niva but good

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm only familiar with the older 1970s model
    they are good off road but noisy and bouncy on road. wiring loom has bad insulation material it dried out and became brittle and cracked, piston rings wore out quickly too.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >Have you driven in Iceland or know what they drive locallly?
    No, have a mate who has though and they mostly drive jap 4x4 and trucks when off pavement, but Nivas are still a thing due to their low entry price.

    Imo the Niva is reliable in the sense that you can always bring the fricker back to life with minimal effort, not in the old Mercedes sense that it will keep running with minimal effort.
    They will always get you to your destination, your hands won't stay clean because something malfunctioned on the way, you'll be sore and late, but frick me we're getting there. That's the kind of reliability you get.
    There's no comfort though, everything rattles and squeaks, there's a new clunking noise when you let off the gas, driving on pavement is bumpy like you're off-road, the controls are a bit awkward and the cabin isn't very spacious. You can't even really adjust the seats in the older models.
    Heated is the breasts though, you'll get toasty inside just by opening the core valve and blower off.
    Even during -30c winter you'll be cracking the window open to cool the cabin.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This sounds like my impression of most Soviet/Russian vehicles.
      Everything is kind of rough and can require a bit of work fairly often, but it's usually not particularly complicated, and it's not like you can do a worse job than some vodka-addled, disgruntled hero of the working class with FAS if you wrench it yourself.
      At least the heating's good, as the engine is so terribly inefficient that it's basically a fuel-powered heater that may produce some torque as a byproduct. When it's not overheating, which can happen a lot at higher speeds.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Idk, at least in Finland summer, so like 25c in the sun, the cooling is working as intended, never had one overheat on me. That's Škoda stuff anyway.

        Ive seen these trucks with air hoses running to the wheels and adjustable locking diffs. They stop and either lock or unlock the diff when going off main road and decrease tyre pressure (I think)
        Can some anon explain

        Also if anyone can explain the need for low and high 4x4 when off road.

        >Adjustable diffs
        Are you sure you're not thinking about hub lockers? There's a small switch you turn in the wheel hub to engage/disengage that wheel when going 4x4. Disengage both front wheels for example and you can drive in RWD mode, consuming less fuel.
        Usually in purpose built 4x4 machines you aren't supposed to drive on hard/firm surfaces at road speeds in 4x4 mode.

        High and low gear are exactly what it says on the tin. High gears are more for getting around fast, like on roads and such and low gears are for sending more torque into the wheels to get over and through shit.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you bring car from mainland europe
    >Toyota Hilux
    >Nissan King cab
    >Toyota land cruiser
    >Mitsubishi Pajero
    >Mitsubishi L200
    Obviously diesels, other option would be to get some american pickup truck big suv

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Obviously diesels
      Why so. Petrols are the most popular car in Iceland

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes get a Niva

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i wouldnt bring the lada, i doubt youd be able to find parts locally if it ever should need them. Look into what cars are most popular there and get whichever one you like/can afford. Unless you wanna buy a lada niva then wait 20 days for a MAP sensor to ship while its too cold to walk outside
    >what if i take it to a mechanic
    they will have the same exact problem excep they'll charge more for it

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Or get a carbed Niva and live trouble free
      >carb dieseling solenoid kys itself

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nivas doesn't have MAP, they have MAF sensors. And it will work only for 2 months since they're all low quality fake chinkshit after Bosch stopped its production in Russia.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Nothing can be worse than Bosch.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          even russians don't drive them shits, they all prefer toyotas

          knock off bosch

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Look at what the locals drive.

    [...]

    >Have I been misinformed by the Internet?
    Probably.
    >I thought the whole point was they were reliable and essy to fix - bolt on and off?
    I guess it's a no to both. They are cheap, the parts are cheap and easily available, but you have to be in a post-Soviet country for that to be applicable. The design is rather simple, as you might expect from something four or even five decades old. The quality control is almost non-existent though, some newly-bought parts might not even fit. If you like to fix things you fixed recently and don't value your time, that's the car for you.
    >And Jimnys look very small
    It's true, they are small, I didn't feel comfortable sitting that close to the door.
    >and gay
    In the year 2024 it's more likely that you are gay instead of something with two solid axles.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      All fair points.

      The Nivas are hard to find for a good price. 3500€ is the usual for a normal one with bits of rust. Clean examples are 5 to €7k
      So changing my mind.

      Yet to find out what locals drive most. I see a lot of Dacia Dusters on rental firms and small electric or hybrid cars
      Otherwise it is Landcruisers, Dodge Rams and Teslas

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Duster is at least comparable to the Niva, that's actually a very common choice in the ex-Soviet countries where both are available. The Niva of course has way more modding potential but judging by the questions in

        Ive seen these trucks with air hoses running to the wheels and adjustable locking diffs. They stop and either lock or unlock the diff when going off main road and decrease tyre pressure (I think)
        Can some anon explain

        Also if anyone can explain the need for low and high 4x4 when off road.

        , you are very far from that.
        You have to make up your mind about your budget and what do you plan to do with the car. As far as I know off roading in Iceland can be pretty rough, and the proper vehicle will cost you a lot of money. What is the nature of the project at least regarding the means of transportation?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I want to have an all rounder. I'm learning about lift kits and 4x4. I've seen modded Nivas and one day I'd like something as cool as this.
          I want to be free to drive anywhere in the snow and go over highlands a little. Nothing crazy

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I want to be free to drive anywhere in the snow and go over highlands a little. Nothing crazy
            that is pretty crazy. in icelandic winter you need something REALLY serious to get out of the paved roads. there's a good reason they use locally-modified Arctic Trucks stuff with massive balloon tires, and it's because that's what you need to drive on a glacier.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Nah it's all Ram 3500 unmodified doing the type of driving

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    get something that can be serviced and repaired there. I doubt there's a Lada dealer in Reykjavik.
    Suzuki Jimny is a safe bet.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >needing a dealership to make repairs

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >And Jimnys look very small and gay. Nivas look cool
    they're the same size but in the niva you look like a putin-loving moron lmao
    if you think a car can look "gay" (particularly a jimny) you clearly have very deep seated issues to work through and won't listen to advice.

    >Have you driven in Iceland or know what they drive locallly?
    they drive the same little hatchbacks you see everywhere in europe, like mazda2 and shit. you only need 4x4 to go off the main road, and that shit is either for tourists or professionals, and the latter will have Arctic Trucks lifted vans and SUVs. The tourists will take a Jimny or an Explorer for those roads, but most won't even go off the main ring road.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [...]
      oh also
      >There will be deep snow in the Winter.
      no there won't be, there's only one road and they take the snow off of it. if the snow is deeper than what a mazda2 on snow tires can go through, then a Niva won't be able to go through either.

      Are you from Iceland. I've been to Iceland in winter. Not all roads are cleared especially where I will be. I need to get around other than the 1 major road

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        then sure, get a 4x4. but i definitely would get something they use there and not your special snowflake soviet shitbox. if a jimny is too small just get a duster. make sure you're on good snow tires obviously.

        >needing a dealership to make repairs

        do you expect anon who clearly doesn't know much about cars to bring his own parts supply for a car that never set rubber on the island?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I am going to be working in a place that allows me access to a garage as I like so I will be learning. Assume I will be doing my own work

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            you don't want to "learn" on your only mode of transportation in a foreign country

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You're getting side tracked and hung up. Assume everything is possible and will have access to garage and all necessary skills.

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    oh also
    >There will be deep snow in the Winter.
    no there won't be, there's only one road and they take the snow off of it. if the snow is deeper than what a mazda2 on snow tires can go through, then a Niva won't be able to go through either.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >then a Niva won't be able to go through either.
      A modded one might, they are rather lightweight. I know a guy who got 35"s on his and was able to drive around in the deep snow, or, more accurately, on top of it. That's out of OP's reach though.

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Unironically, get a 4x4 Duster.

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I am not sure why people are recommending Dacia. They aren't that great finished.

    I recommend Japanese.
    A subaru forester or impreza AWD will be good for snow and normal driving.
    Toyota Corolla 4x4 models
    Hilux or Pick up from Toyota Range. A Rav4

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I am not sure why people are recommending Dacia. They aren't that great finished.
      They are cheap and you can buy a new or relatively new and unabused one.
      >A subaru forester or impreza AWD will be good for snow and normal driving.
      >Toyota Corolla 4x4 models
      Less ground clearance and worse geometry, no means to lock the center diff. The viscous coupling in the Duster has something like that, and the first gear is really low. Those aren't crossovers.
      >Hilux or Pick up from Toyota Range. A Rav4
      At this point your post is just a mix of different model names without any purpose.

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I spent two weeks in Iceland in late fall and drove around the entire island in a 2wd NV200 diesel manual with zero issues. Because the vast majority of it is coastal, it doesn't get as cold on the mainland as one might expect, and there isn't a hell of a lot of snow everywhere (despite the name).

    There were a ton of Hundai, Nissans, Suzukis, Toyotaa, and Mercedes. Less common is US brands, a fair amount of Jeep though. Virtually nothing else, so the Lada and Dacia are moronic ideas. Jimmy is your best bet for a cheap 4x4 that is widely accepted there.

    As for offroading, 90% of the roads are volcanic slate, flat, and 2wd vehicles have no issue going on them. I only ever got stuck once, and it was because I was being bold on a farmer's fence line road which bottomed out the van up to the frame, and I was able to rock it out after putting some wood behind the rear tires. For the snowy regionss, it's all super wet and heavy requiring insane (well, to me at least) balloon tires to get through. As you might imagine, those vehicles are specialty built, and don't commute on the road unless absolutely necessary. Typical 4x4's will bury themselves as soon as it''s more than 4" deep.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Oh, I forgot, Renault and Citron are also popular there.

      Some other facts:

      -Gas is insanely expensive compared to US pricing. Probably even expensive to euro pricing.
      -No one, and I mean NO ONE goes over the speed limit there. It is extremely frowned upon to speed.
      -Every gas station has an awesome hot dog stand. 10/10, Iceland.
      -The relative humidity never dropped below 70%. Bring warm and waterproof gear.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous
        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous
          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Here's a picture of northern Reykjavik, showing typical cars.

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    They’re kind of like American cars from the 60s- easy to fix, but more prone to breakdown

  22. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >There will be deep snow in the Winter.
    Where are you getting this information? The average snowfall is less than three feet over five months, with a "significant build up" being considered over two inches overnight. At worst, it takes a week to melt off.

  23. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Are you a geologist?

  24. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Iceland is full of Dacias for tourists
    Toyota for locals.

    Tells you all you need to know.
    Nivas are cool but not so common.

    There is also a lot of wrong information and bullshit from tourists and fantasists on here.
    If you've specific questions about Iceland ask me

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