Neet here wants to get into motorcycles but learned what mandatory insurance quotas are.

Neet here wants to get into motorcycles but learned what mandatory insurance quotas are. Is there a list somewhere with the cheapest bikes that have the cheapest insurance rates per state in the US? Extra points if it calculates the average per state

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Metric cruisers or higher cc bikes that boomers/gen x like.
    Young, dumb, full of cum riders are the ones who up the insurance for particular bikes. So ninja's, yamaha r3,r7,r1,r6's, gsxr's, etc.

    I have an ancient triumph daytona as one of my bikes and the insurance from a more common bike(that makes less then half the power) costs more in insurance.

    No idea about your list.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ok any specific beginner cheap examples that have low insurance premiums? I don't mind metric cruisers or genx boomer stuff. I actually like Indian bikes

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The naked versions of sportbikes have lower premiums generally, you may pay half the prize for a z650 vs a ninja 650 and it’s essentially the same bike, same for the mt07 vs the r7, cb500 vs cbr 500 etc etc.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Hilariously untrue. You are paying per crash/speeding/theft statistics per model. The MT07 is one of the most expensive bikes to insure. OP should look into a Vstrom 650, they're the definition of an old man bike but very capable.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What state are you in? Some states, like Florida, have fairly high mandatory insurance that will absolutely rape you no matter what. Like what said, your best bet is a "not scary" bike that won't get you reamed too much. Honda Rebel / Shadow may fit the bill quite well. Also, your age will play a significant role in premiums.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Beautiful bike. I would love to have one like that if I wasn't a pussy.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >if I wasn't a pussy.

          What does that mean? They're excellent machines. If you're too scared to ride you probably should not though. Most normals should not be motorcyclists.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Thanks man, I've put a lot of work into it, and I know I'd like to repaint it at some point.
          >If I wasn't such a pussy.
          You can always start small and work up to larger bikes. Alternatively, off-road / dual sport bikes get you away from everyone on the road.

          Out of the ones listed ITT and pic rel, which one needs the least maintenance?

          Newer bikes will always be less maintenance intensive. My bike is from 1977, so I've had to put some work into it, and always will have to. Older bikes (and cars) are easier to work on, but you have to work on them more often. That said, any bike will always be more work than a comparable car.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            How much do you usually spend on maintenance and how often? I'm wondering how much I should have saved up before suddenly driving across the country and shit

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Have a few grand that you can afford to lose in an absolute worst-case scenario and/or a credit card.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I know this would be the wise thing to do but I'm 24 and rotting away in my mothers basement.

            I've put maybe $300 in parts so far, not including tools (that I already owned). Spark plugs, ignition coils, clutch pack rebuild, new head lamp, and ignition rewiring were the most costly ones, but also mostly part of the old bike experience. A new bike would be looking at chain maintenance (if applicable, shaft drives are considerably lower maintenance), oil, filters, fluids, tires, and brakes as standard maintenance items. Bikes tend to have shorter maintenance intervals than cars, but a good bike from a reputable brand (any Japanese big 4) is highly unlikely to leave you stranded or sunk on repair costs. Euro bikes are cool and have great performance, but maintenance can be more frequent and costly.

            Oh splendid. Not bad. Yeah I'll check out the kz650 . Any tips?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You shouldn't be buying a 40+ year old bike as your first one. You want something you can just change the oil, air filters, tires, and spark plugs on. For a brand new rider, any of Honda's 500-engine bikes like the Rebel or CB500X would be an ideal choice. It is not powerful enough to really get you trouble but will easily keep up with even interstate traffic. Throw a luggage stack and saddlebags on and see the country. What is your budget?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You shouldn't be buying a 40+ year old bike as your first one. You want something you can just change the oil, air filters, tires, and spark plugs on. For a brand new rider, any of Honda's 500-engine bikes like the Rebel or CB500X would be an ideal choice. It is not powerful enough to really get you trouble but will easily keep up with even interstate traffic. Throw a luggage stack and saddlebags on and see the country. What is your budget?

            <- This guy is right. As much as I love the old bike, it definitely shows its age sometimes. If you want a turn-key, minimal BS bike, buy one made in the last 5 years. Kawasaki even makes the z650 / z900 retro sport bikes that style themselves after old UJMs. Buy a gently used bike from a dealer, then trade / sell for your dream bike once you're confident or in a better financial state.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If he's on a Z900RS he's dead in a week.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >If he's on a Z900RS he's dead in a week.
            If only we could all be so fortunate.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I've put maybe $300 in parts so far, not including tools (that I already owned). Spark plugs, ignition coils, clutch pack rebuild, new head lamp, and ignition rewiring were the most costly ones, but also mostly part of the old bike experience. A new bike would be looking at chain maintenance (if applicable, shaft drives are considerably lower maintenance), oil, filters, fluids, tires, and brakes as standard maintenance items. Bikes tend to have shorter maintenance intervals than cars, but a good bike from a reputable brand (any Japanese big 4) is highly unlikely to leave you stranded or sunk on repair costs. Euro bikes are cool and have great performance, but maintenance can be more frequent and costly.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >That said, any bike will always be more work than a comparable car.

            Mechanic here of many decades. Not really. What has your KZ needed with any frequency? Compare and contrast to a 1977 car or truck over the same period. Bikes are vastly easier to work on and far more accessible. What has it needed that was not a result of previous owner neglect? KZs of the era are generally a fine balance of simplicity, low maintenance needs (for example valve adjustment) and durability. KZ police bikes were built for many years after newer models replaced them for civilian use only ceasing production in 2005.

            https://www.bikebound.com/2019/01/27/kawasaki-kzp/

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Fair enough, and I'll defer to you on experience. That said, the bike only has 13k miles on the clock, which many would consider to be within one year of average driving in a car. I imagine the engine will need to be rebuilt by at least 100k if not far sooner, which most car drivers nowadays would consider outrageously bad.

            I know this would be the wise thing to do but I'm 24 and rotting away in my mothers basement.
            [...]
            Oh splendid. Not bad. Yeah I'll check out the kz650 . Any tips?

            You may look into Universal Japanese Motorcycles (UJM) as a whole. All 4 brands made them in different sizes for several years, and even the model designations for decades after the style went out of fashion. I learned to ride on my dad's Honda CB350, which was what made fall in love with UJMs in the first place.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm currently on Commifornie but I might move to New Hampshire with my LFR gf. Or Oregon/Michigan. Funny you mention Florida that's on our maybe list.

        When i had a metric cruiser with only basic liability, i paid $75 for the year as a 22 year old male. so if you're into cruisers look at the honda shadow and kawasaki vulcan s and buy a used one outright. shadow will be more classic cruiser, vulcan will feel sportier despite still having cruiser lean angles.

        Hilariously untrue. You are paying per crash/speeding/theft statistics per model. The MT07 is one of the most expensive bikes to insure. OP should look into a Vstrom 650, they're the definition of an old man bike but very capable.

        The naked versions of sportbikes have lower premiums generally, you may pay half the prize for a z650 vs a ninja 650 and it’s essentially the same bike, same for the mt07 vs the r7, cb500 vs cbr 500 etc etc.

        I have a 300cc CFMoto that's $30 a month. Had for a year now so I could probably get something bigger with reasonable insurance.

        I remember when I was shopping for insurance even different brands resulted in different rates. I think it was gixxers had a significantly higher rate than equivalent bikes from other companies.

        >how's the CFMoto
        Never had an issue with it. Can't complain at all for a first bike.

        Thanks for the Recs .

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I live in CA and my insurance went down at around 27 years old.
          Current insurance is 300-400 a year for like 2 or 3 bikes, uninsured motorist, and I live in a suburb outside of the capitol.
          Oh, and registration minimum is 150usd, even for a shitbike.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Out of the ones listed ITT and pic rel, which one needs the least maintenance?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have a 300cc CFMoto that's $30 a month. Had for a year now so I could probably get something bigger with reasonable insurance.

    I remember when I was shopping for insurance even different brands resulted in different rates. I think it was gixxers had a significantly higher rate than equivalent bikes from other companies.

    >how's the CFMoto
    Never had an issue with it. Can't complain at all for a first bike.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I have a 300cc CFMoto that's $30 a month.
      Insurance is obviously going to be reasonable for a beginner bike you bought off wish.com, has shit for power, and nobody even wants to steal.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >CFMoto is le bad cuz is made in China
        >CFMoto makes the engines for KTM, BMW and now Yamaha recently partnered with them to make their bikes as well.
        Absolute moron, keep enjoying your shitty overpriced HD garbage, don't forget to buy another T-shirt!.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    State doesn't matter as much, if you're a man under 30 you're getting raped no matter what especially if your bike has fairings or isn't old as dirt.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    When i had a metric cruiser with only basic liability, i paid $75 for the year as a 22 year old male. so if you're into cruisers look at the honda shadow and kawasaki vulcan s and buy a used one outright. shadow will be more classic cruiser, vulcan will feel sportier despite still having cruiser lean angles.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >gets hit by a car, because he is NEET he can't pay health bills and becomes Homeless

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Pussy mentality

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    An ebike is better for your kind. Where are you going to go? Nowhere but the store because you don't have a job to use the highway.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I put my dad with 10 years riding experience on my insurance for my 98 cbr900rr so I pay 250 a year in michigan. he's never touched a bike kek

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That trick doesn't work in first world countries.

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