One or two stage car paint

I am planing on painting my car and can't decide if I should use one or two stage paint, any experiences?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I could ask on DA but they are moronic and preoccupied by shitting on eachothers car

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You won't get a lot of 'depth' with single stage. Usually is a bit softer too and will take longer to harden up. Tiny scratches are a bit more noticable too. You can cut and buff single stage just as easy as two stage imo, a lot of people say otherwise but it works fine.

    If you are a cheap bastard single stage it's fine. If you don't have much experience I would do single stage too since you ain't gonna lay it down perfect anyway.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I was planning on painting pure white with no depth on my car, but I would like it to be very glossy

      Single stage paint is softer?
      Also what about 2 component vs one component paint? What would you recommend?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        you mix up alot of stuff here and the others as well.
        1 stage 2 stage is the way of applying it, 1K vs 2K is the chemistry behind it.

        now how do cars get painted in the factory 2000-2020 they get a thick filler coat which hides imperfections in the steel and can be sanded really well. it also provides corosion protection against stone chips and scratches beause its so thick.
        chemistry is water based 1K acrylic urethane (actually2K but heat activated) it needs to get oven baked.

        you dont need this because your car is already painted and another coat of filler would make the whole paintjob to thick which causes other problems. i recomend scuffing the whole car with P800 and wiping it with silicone remover.

        after imperfections are sanded from the filler it gets a "thin" water based acrilic color coat this is just for optics and provides no protection, this way you can save money on the more expensive colorfull paints. this coat gets lightly dried in a low temp oven and goes directly to the clear coat line.

        clear coat is what actually makes car paint so strong its Solvent borne 2K Acrylic Urethane paint. Acrlic paint with Isocyanate hardener. once it hardens it resists even solvents it gets applied pretty thick and also contains many aditives like UV stabilizers. A car only painted in primer/filler would flake off after a few years in the sun.

        t work in this industry

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i say 2020 because noways there are trying to replace the filler with a pre coat which gets painted over while wet which saves you a huge oven and all the ppl sanding the primer.

          nothing of this can be used for ops home project but i hope i didn't cause more confusion.

          if i had to paint my car i would make sure to use a 2K paint which is recommended for cars.
          2K tile paint or interior whatever could work but probably has not enough UV stabilizers, or gets to hard or to soft.

          1K is trash for a car:
          Solvent borne alkyd enamel will take months to dry but after a year or so it would become as scratch and solvent resistant as 2K
          Water based acrylic will dry fast but never get really thought and is hard to get a even finish since it doesn't flow very well.

          single stage will be less work 2 stage could look better if done correctly (spraying clear by hand is the supreme discipline for painters)
          with a good manufacture both will probably last good.
          UV sensitive pigments like red will probably fade faster without a thick clear coat on it. UV protection in the paint as opposed to completely covering it

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          > needs to get oven baked.
          Can just use a heat gun on small areas?
          I think I’ve seen other’s struggling with powder coating—I heard that’s the best finish though.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            for repairs a infrared heater is used a heat gun would prob cause an uneven finish because of the air.

            for full repairs a special low temp paint is used which dries at room temp or something like 80c a OEM body oven with its 160°C would melt all interior of a finished car.

            but this is a whole other science just look how many different clear coats standox sells and how many hardeners and additives. which can be combined differently for different temperatures climates humidity.
            a repair shop in Florida will need different additives than one in Alaska even if they have booths.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Good info, thanks,
            I have this badger artist airbrush I was going to try using for repairs after thinning it down.
            Then clearcoat x 2, then sand/blend to 2000 grit, then polish.
            I’m thinking car wraps will eventually replace painting, LOL

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I tried wrapping my car with KPMF vinyl and brother... It's so not worth it if you care about final finish. Wrap is so fricking bad with orangepeel (Thats why you mostly see only matte wraps on cars) and it's soft as frick. You can easily scratch it with your finger nail, I learned my lesson.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I’m thinking car wraps will eventually replace painting, LOL

            well one coat of paint is def needed for corrosion protection, but i could see something like tesla where only black and white are avaible by the factory and you get a car wrap of choice.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Use base/clear. It's the industry standard...there's a reason the manufacturers use it.
    Single stage, e.g. Imron or Centari, dries slower...I don't touch it for a month after spraying. SS has its uses...I use it on my woods trucks that get scratched up while wheeling since I can lay on an extra coat or two, and should I happen to want to buff out the scratches, I can, since rarely will the scratches penetrate thru to the primer.
    Any paint that is worth applying is 2-component, meaning a paint mixed with a catalyst to harden it. I occasionally spray Rustoleum for people, usually for dump trucks and the like, it's great once it dries, but it takes forever to do so.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Unhardened paint does not belong on modern cars.
    Single stage hardened paint is faster, cheaper and better for industrial stuff.
    2 stage base/clear are best. The painter can focus on color uniformity, coverage, metallic texture and blends with the base and then focus on shine with the clear.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      > shine
      I’m seeing a lot of high-end cars in “flat” black lately

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        did you check the skin color of the driver

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    jyst use the shit they use on excavators and other heavy equipment

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