Pre-War Cars? Good buy?

Where's the anon who posted the Pre-War car thread? Now the Wall Street Journal is apparently recommending buying a pre-war car. Either this is the top of an insane bubble, or things are about to get worse. Have you purchased a 100 year old hunk of metal that is practically undriveable in the hopes of someday having more money? pic related

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >generic common model ford
    Lmao should have gotten something genuinely rare and desirable.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    WSJ is tard bait but the more people buy those cars the better for their supporting aftermarket.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    no i have a 60 year old car thats been a headache for the last 17 years I dont need one thats even worse

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    When it comes to prewar cars you either want a Ford or Chevy (well-supported, parts easily available) or a luxoboat like a Packard (also well-supported). If you fancy a Studebaker, Hudson, Willys, etc good luck--there's no aftermarket for those.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      And as with any era of cars, sedans are cheap while you will pay dearly for any two door or convertible.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know much about them, but I see stuff like '20s and '30s Fords and Buicks regularly going for $8-15k in running and driving condition as of late. Nothing super pristine in that range of course, but in (supposedly) original or formerly restored condition with all mechanical bits working. Kinda neat that you can get a century old, still-working car for that price.
    At least one person in my neighborhood has one, and I can always hear the distinctive clatter coming down the street before I see it roll by.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    pre-war car prices are falling because the people that had an affinity towards them are dying off and nobody cares to pick up the torch. And realistically, the majority of pre-war cars didn't carry a lot of value anyway, it was all carried by 32 Fords and Bugattis.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In a way they are, you can get them pretty cheap really at around $5000 or less and could be fun to drive around town. I don't think they will go up in value, I think they will stay around the same. If you want something usable then get stuff from the 60's, even if they are weak in areas they can be easily modified to be a good daily.

      From what I see on ebay they are not that easy to sell but eventually someone will take it. I like the Cadillac v16 but many of the cars from the 40's almost feel like kit cars or home made with how basic the construction is.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >pre-war car prices are falling because the people that had an affinity towards them are dying off and
      Anyone who owned these things when they were new died 25+ years ago.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Ok. You don't have to be around when they were new to have an affinity towards a car, hence the statement "nobody is there to pick up the torch". Do you think all the people that want muscle cars, or all the people that want 90s JDM were alive when they were new...?

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You'll have to rebuild the carbs about every 3-6 months
    And don't expect anyone else to tool on it, you're on your own
    You're gonna need to be able to fabricate some parts, too, these were made before all parts were interchangeable
    t.Grandpa had a '32 Chevy, it still runs, my uncle got it

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >You'll have to rebuild the carbs about every 3-6 months

      You don't actually have to do as much maintenance on these cars as you would have when they were new mostly because modern oil/gasoline/air filters are far superior to what they had in 1935 so you don't get your engine gummed up with sludge every 30k miles.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Hey man, I used to go on parades with Grandpa every summer, I don't think the 80s and 90s had that much better gas, oil, or filters, and come to think of it, I don't remember it having any filters, but I do remember having to tune the carbs before any major trips, and he took it out weekly

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Pre-war cars
    The US has been at war its entire existence. A 2000 Chevy lumina is a pre-war car

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I like to be moronic on purpose

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      "Pre-War" and "Post-War" are commonly used to refer to the Second World War because it still remains the most impactful turning point in recent world history for people living now.
      Uncle A continues to live rent free in our heads for multiple reasons.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Have you purchased a 100 year old hunk of metal that is practically undriveable
    It's 95 and drives pretty well since the new bearings actually

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      impressive! How fast can it go?

      There's a 1938 Pontiac straight 6 for sale near me, I find it tempting

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Probably tops out in the 50s. The aerodynamics on these things are nearly nonexistent.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          impressive! How fast can it go?

          There's a 1938 Pontiac straight 6 for sale near me, I find it tempting

          Top speed is 66 but purrs nicely at about 55

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            id be more worried about how it stops

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            round he goes
            round he goes
            where he stops
            no one knows

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            With drums all round it stops, eventually

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    what a doughy homosexual

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You have to be able to drive manual shift of course but it's not that bad because most prewar cars were designed to minimize shifting--put it in second gear and leave it there for most of the trip. Most American cars had synchro gearboxes by the early '30s and premium makes like Cadillac and Packard before that although often the first gear is unsynchronized.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not anymore that people are recommending them. You're too late now.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you are not a seriously good mechanic who enjoys industrial history and has plenty of time to tinker you do not need a prewar car. As vehicles they're dangerous by modern standards because the brakes are worthless and their design will kill or maim you in low speed hits.

    Want money? Choose an index fund because cars are LUXURIES not necessities. I grew up around those cars in the 1970s restoration world and it's certainly fun but not a wise way to bet your retirement.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >cars are LUXURIES not necessities
      Go have a nice day in your roach infested apartment surrounded by Black folk, cityhomosexual.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm a practical ruralhomosexual who owns trucks to do useful things. Cars are toys while trucks do everything functional better and last much longer doing it. Non-wrenchlets tend to own trucks as our main vehicles because they unlike cars are functional (and in the US petrol is free).

        Ok. You don't have to be around when they were new to have an affinity towards a car, hence the statement "nobody is there to pick up the torch". Do you think all the people that want muscle cars, or all the people that want 90s JDM were alive when they were new...?

        Your other example vehicles are perfectly useful and practical dailies in 2024 if maintained.

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