Seat Leon

I own a Seat Leon, 1.2 TSi (yea, petrol and small cc but still 4 cylinders!).
Got it in February of this year with 119K KM (73K Mi), and until now I've traveled a total of 5k KM (3.1 Mi) on the Italian soil, went to Munich with the car packed and traveled multiple time to Switzerland (pic was taken in Passo del San Bernardino), so far no issues.

I would've preferred it being Automatic or a 2.0TDI, but that's what I've bought with less than 8K Euros + 800 Euros insurance + 600 Euros for the title...

We're going to travel in many places together and i want to upgrade it to make it more reliable and secure, Euro-bros what should i upgrade in my Seat?

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  1. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >make it more reliable
    step one sell it
    step two buy anything other than a tsi timebomb

  2. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    > step two buy anything other than a tsi timebomb

    Due to the bs Italian laws, I can't own anything better without paying lots in taxes and title exchange.
    That's what I could've afforded at the time, so I'm gonna stick with it until it will definitely explode.

    I'm asking for upgrades to make it reliable for a reason.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      But there's no such upgrades. The main problem with these cars is that the engine tends to randomly fail catastrophically past 120k KM, so most people sell them before that

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Thanks for the feedback. I guess my lack of information regarding this engine made it worse, luckily I know how-to-do some self maintenance, which was pretty handful in some scenarios.

        I will try my luck once I move to another country, still looking to VW since i like the design and fuel economy.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >120k km
        What the frick? Audi A6 bought with 200k turns out it was 400k, engine shat itself around 600k

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          It almost certainly wasn't a 1.2 or 1.4 TSI then, I don't think you can even get those in the A6 chassis size.

          I'm not saying they all fail before 200k but it's not terribly uncommon. They are not known for long term reliability.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            It was a 1.9TDI if I remember correctly. Definitely not similar I was just pointing out the shit reliability nowadays.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            The 1.9 TDI is probably the best shitty econobox engine ever made. There's just nothing completely half assed about them, even the water pump impeller is brass instead of plastic or something.

  3. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    The Seat Leon wagon from 2017 is actually one of the least likely cars to fail inspection in Finland.
    Some of the TSI engines are more reliable than others, but at least a VW car probably won't frick up its suspension or steering rods like a Tesla or something. The Tesla Model 3 has a 30% rejection rate in a few places.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Mine is from 2013 with 5F1 engine (pic related). As stated before, I don't know about its reliability.

      For instance, my previous car (and first car as well) was an Opel Astra GTC from 2007 with a Z16LET engine, due to the fact that a car with Euro 4 emissions cannot enter in the surroundings of Milan, I had to switch to this one.

      I knew that this kind of engine tends to blow the head gasket and the average consumption being 7.5 L/ 100KM, but instead I don't know anything related to the 5F1 engines.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        > a car with Euro 4 emissions cannot enter in the surroundings of Milan, I had to switch to this one.
        Europeans are so pathetic.

  4. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    VAG shitboxes after 2010 are notorious moneypits. Maybe the 2.0tdi fares better and if your country doesn't impose a displacement tax its a decent choice. Beyond that I wouldn't put my money in any VAG car.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Unfortunately in Italy the car scene is different, with lots of nonsense taxes we don't have the possibility to get a 2.0TDI car, besides some sketchy rednecks.

      If you wouldn't put your interest in to a VAG, what car do you suggest anon?

      I'm not trying being a VAG-fan, but I'm curious.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      The 1.4 engines are notorious for the tensioners going bad, the chain going bad or the engine leaking/burning a bottle of oil every 1000 km or so.
      I think the more recent 1.0 and 1.5 TSIs are a bit better, though some revisions may blow their turbo randomly.

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    should've bought a 320d from a romanian with the biggest wheels possible

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      that was my first idea when I thought "it's time to change the car".
      But, as stated before, I only had 8k euros (just for the car itself) and it had to be petrol so I can access Milan

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        I will sell you my 325i for 6k euros

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        euro5, 182k km

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          ah yes, the 320d with largest possible rims
          the brown mans choice

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            it's a driver's car
            you wouldn't understand

  6. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >yea, petrol and small cc but still 4 cylinders!)
    Europe is HELL

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Don't feel sorry for them, they voted for this shit themselves. The eternal eurocuck deserves no pity.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        That's not true, the EU politicians vote for themselves. No real democracy there. It's just a bunch of boomers trying to save the world by destroying everything that makes the world great.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Sounds like eurocope.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          0 responsibility

  7. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    idk anythimg about vw engineering on these little euroboxes, but if you want it to be reliable just leave it be and maintain it.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Lol
      Lmao
      These cars are designed to last the warranty and not a second more

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Imagine buying a piece of shit that explodes after 100k embarrassing.
        Unironically they don't make them like they used to.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >idk anythimg about vw engineering
        We can tell

        sorry anons, i only buy american cars so i assumed that by now all the gay foreign cars would realise american engineering was the best and would start copying it by now. guess i was wrong

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >idk anythimg about vw engineering
      We can tell

  8. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Who the frick unironically buys a Seat?
    You have all these options out there and you go like: yeah I will pick the Seat out of everything.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      At this point a SEAT is basically an Audi or a VW with slightly harder plastic. That isn't exactly a good thing, but anyways.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      who the frick buys an audi or vw
      >audi
      vw but upmarketed
      >vw
      generic shitbox
      >seat
      generic shitbox but with soul

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >We're going to travel in many places together and i want to upgrade it to make it more reliable and secure, Euro-bros what should i upgrade in my Seat?
    apart from just regular servicing:
    get good tires. this is the single best upgrade you can make to any car.
    yes michelins are a lot more expensive than linglongs. it's still worth it. shorter braking distance, better grip in the dry and wet, overall makes your car quicker, more fun and safer.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Vredestein are about as good as Michelins and cost less

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    just change the timing chain if its an ea111

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