Share some old school mechanic tricks or street wise wrenching hacks.

What tricks of the trade do you know or have heard of that is old school method or a dirty street smart trick you know of?

>When reassembling something that has screws or cap-screws going into soft materials, such as aluminum or plastic, cross-threading them can be a problem. I found that if you lightly turn the fastener counter-clockwise first until you feel the threads "click" a bit and drop, that's you finding the original threads.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A mixture of ammonia and bleach makes a really good degreaser and general cleaner. It's especially great on interior surfaces.

    • 2 months ago
      TooZ

      bruh..

      You only need a torque wrench for powertrain internals. Everything else can be torqued by emotion with a cordless impact.

      BRUH!

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        God that episode sucked so hard, such a weak way to end the show

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've broken vintage made in America wrenches doing that, don't do that.
      Use vicegrips on the bolt and put your pipe over the back of the vicegrips

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You only need a torque wrench for powertrain internals. Everything else can be torqued by emotion with a cordless impact.

    • 2 months ago
      Bepis

      Pretty much. Anything with bearings and a large mating surface with a gasket, a torque wrench is nice as well.

      https://i.imgur.com/lhzlIUH.jpg

      What tricks of the trade do you know or have heard of that is old school method or a dirty street smart trick you know of?

      >When reassembling something that has screws or cap-screws going into soft materials, such as aluminum or plastic, cross-threading them can be a problem. I found that if you lightly turn the fastener counter-clockwise first until you feel the threads "click" a bit and drop, that's you finding the original threads.

      Don’t touch anybody’s car if you can’t tell when something is cross-threaded.

      My hack for the day- a piece of wire + a magnet + JB Weld makes a great pickup tool when a regular telescoping one can’t quite get into some corner.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I wouldn't install tie-rods without a torque wrench.

  3. 2 months ago
    s10fag

    glass pane + aerosol adhesive + sandpaper = shadetree head deck

    never hit tie rod ends directly, some knuckles will even have a boss for you to hit with your hammer. If you must, take the castle nut off and put it back on backwards before you hit it.

    garage sales are a great place to pick up tools and shop equipment cheap, my latest haul was a home made bench press, 2 trailer jacks, 3 hydraulic cylinders, a pack of lenox sawzall blades, and a machete for $5

    a dial caliper and multimeter will save a lot of grief with new parts

    if you can make a waveform from an audrino or some shit (NERD!), congratulations on saving about $500, this is well documented, get used to making your own tools especially tech related

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >a waveform
      a hwut

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Vehicle with a mechanical high pressure fuel pump won’t start due to low rail pressure (either a bad sensor or a failed pump) setting a low pressure code and inhibiting injector pulse.
    >clear codes
    >disconnect rail pressure sensor
    >open and close the door about 15 times (or cycle the key) to prime the frick out of the lift pump and fill fuel all the way up to the rail
    >spray a whole can of brake clean down the throttle body
    >start vehicle
    Congrats you are now running on only the lift pump (~75psi) the PCM will keep firing the injectors, it’ll set a code for fuel rail pressure sensor open circuit instead of a low pressure code and you can now move the vehicle around while you wait for parts instead of pushing it on dollys

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The most savage and thing a mechanic has ever told me for an automatic transmission slippage , for a quick repair, is to mix friction modifier and carburetor cleaner and pour it in the transmission.

    What that does is make all the seals and bands swell up to block leaks and make the gears shift smoothly.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      for about a month until the trans fully shits itself. That's just mean to buy you time for a rebuild.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Buy a bunch of $1 plastic-handled steel-wire brushes. When you have to take off a rusted, cruddy nut, take just ONE MINUTE to clean the area where nut and the threads meet, before even hitting it with penetrating fluid. I got by without an impact gun, for a long fricking time and this makes life a lot easier.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Any other tips for a rusty bolt? Im about to try and remove one from a five year old car (shouldn't be rusted too badly but the head of the bolt definitely is, frick!) ?
      Anyone know if pb blaster or white lithium grease spray is bad on paint ? (Not clearcoated paint)?
      I want to remove and replace this bolt before I get to the point where I CANT and it snaps on me. Supposed to be something only torqued to 7 lbf ft...

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        try coating it in atf. shit probably works better than actual, dedicated penetrants. longer you leave it the better

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          ATF on its own doesn't have good penetrative properties, you need to mix acetone into it for that. Acetone is obviously bad for paint, though.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        A little dielectric grease on seals for lights, sockets, relays etc really helps down the road or for the next guy.

        Keep an eye on your gauges, especially if you have voltage, oil pressure, etc. Sure, theyre not the greatest but knowning whats normal for your ride can help you spot trouble before its a problem.

        The penetrant/oil/grease/whatever can soak into the paint and stain it... odds are you wont know till its too late. Mask it off as best you can. Tractor resto dudes say a 50/50 of acetone and atf is the best shit for rusty nuts. Mix it up in an old mason jar.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I said cheap wire brushes, but if you have the room to work, a body grinder with a wire wheel is really the way to go. This is more for nuts, rather than bolt-heads, but fricking get in there and put some pressure on that wire wheel. Even on bolt heads, it'll break away any buildup and allow penetrant to get in there easier. I've seen guys frick around with impact guns that STILL couldn't break the bolt loose - I guarantee I could've cleaned up those fasteners and used a breaker bar.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is for bodywork but if you have severe rust you can cut out use some thick paper or thin cardboard and place it onto the metal to make a template that you try to form in some sheet metal. This can be good if you can find junkyard cars with that panel. Once you have the rough shape you put the metal into place using clecos, its a type of rivet that can easily be removed and reused. I learned this from the fitze fabrication channel.

        This is something that you always get boomers saying nah, that will never work but it does. I had water get in through cracked rear window seals and cause long rust holes under the seats.

        Have a very rusty bolt, try putting the stick welder on it for about 2 seconds. So you touch the stick on the metal and glows red, then you turn off the welder. You will have a nub you may be able to tap and it makes the bolt very hot. It worked for me on my differential.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Any other tips for a rusty bolt? Im about to try and remove one from a five year old car (shouldn't be rusted too badly but the head of the bolt definitely is, frick!) ?
      Anyone know if pb blaster or white lithium grease spray is bad on paint ? (Not clearcoated paint)?
      I want to remove and replace this bolt before I get to the point where I CANT and it snaps on me. Supposed to be something only torqued to 7 lbf ft...

      Start spraying everything the week before

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    When you're taking screws out of old plastic, tighten it just until it clicks first and you'll drastically reduce the risk of stripping or cracking it.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    not really a hack, more of a tip. upon reinstalling a fine pitch screw, always reverse until you feel and hear a "clink" or the starting point of the thread. then from the starting point the screw can be tightened. that way prevents cross threading screws.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Pfft, this guy's trying to take away your free loctite

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    avoid gripping wrenches with a closed fist in tight spaces. instead push with a slightly open palm. it could reduce the possibility of slicing skin on knuckles from a slip and impact.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >father was a mechanic in cuba
    >fixed it all and repaired pretty much anything in a communist country.

    Showed me the recipe for home made brake fluid.
    >shampoo
    >4 tablespoons spoons of brown sugar
    >isopropyl alcohol 70%

    Not to long a ago my wifus suburban 5.3 flex fuel was running sluggish and not reaching top rpm range , take it to the dealer oh its the map sensors , still no fix, take it back oh its the idle air control valve still not resolved.

    >call my pops up explain to him the issue
    >shows up with 2 5 gallon vp racing jugs filled with diesel.
    >siphon out the old gas
    >fill the car with diesel , star it up and ket it idle.
    >tells me to jack the car up and drain the oil.
    > shit you fricking not chunks of carbon and gunk were draining out.
    >repeat the process cycling the key.
    > until the engine gets cleaned up internally.

    All it was , was the ethanol gumming up everything with carbon build up even the valves but the diesel cleaned it up.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      you ran diesel through a gas engine?

      im a motorcycle guy not a car guy so stuff like this is outside my range of knowledge

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I think what he meant was diesel in place of oil? Because I've heard of that but not running diesel as fuel for a petrol car

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        No my mistake we used it to flush the oiling system, but i think we also poured some in the tank to can’t remember

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Please tell more

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    this is one my dad taught me, you can avoid cross-threading by gently tightening by hand

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    righty tighty lefty loosey

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >always smear white grease on stainless threads before tightening them
      >torque everything to spec, always
      >clean allen and torx heads before putting the key in them
      >never mix DIN nuts and bolts with JIS

      >is not always true
      >tappy-tap hydraulic connectors if they don't come lose

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        putting anything on torque-spec fasteners changes the torque spec
        that is why everyone is taught not to put never-seize on plug threads (and then use factory torque level)

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    -if you don't have an impact and need to break a fastener loose, sudden jerking motions on the tool are much less likely to snap or round them off, as opposed to just applying constant force. also useful for removing things like flywheels where trying to remove them the usual way just makes them spin
    -an impact screwdriver is surprisingly useful
    -ATF is just as good as, if not better than actual penetrants. mix with acetone to thin it out and allow it to wick up threads even better.
    -slightly moist bread stuffed behind a pilot bearing and hammer it in with an impact extension to push the bearing out. stuff more bread as it gets compacted by the hammering
    -crank pulley bolt: stick a breaker bar over it, brace it against the frame and turn the starter on briefly, should loosen it (beware with honda engines, some of them have the crank spin counterclockwise)
    -if you can't do starter bump, wrap an old, long v-belt around an accessory pulley, and the crank pulley. shove excess slack into the crank pulley, in the direction you want to turn the bolt in. this stops the pulley from moving. keep sharply jerking on the breaker bar to break the bolt loose. can also be used to torque it up
    -floor jack handle slipped over a breaker bar makes for a great cheater bar
    -for vehicles without electric handbrakes, a c clamp and an old brake pad make pushing the piston in easy. for electric brakes, i dunno. good luck lol
    -brake cleaner is really good bug spray

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >sudden jerking motions on the tool are much less likely to snap or round them off
      Far more likely to snap them off. Much less likely to round them off. Impacts get rusty bolts loose because they shake everything, you can achieve the same effect by hammering away at the bolt before you start wrenching on it.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        they also hammer on the fastener though

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        If you have a tight fastener that needs an impact, but you can't fit one in there, just put a spanner on it and wail on it with a hammer.

        You can get slogging spanners made for this purpose, but you can do it with regular spanners too they just end up covered in dents.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Impact screwdriver
      Can't recommend this enough. Not always enough space to use one, but you can get the crustiest, most fricked up bolts loose in two or three whacks. It even works wonders on screws that have been chewed up too much to use a regular screwdriver.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I just bought one cause it was recommended when doing rotors since my car put screws in em. Useful tool..

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >for electric brakes, i dunno. good luck lol
      unplug the electric portion and run the motor in reverse with a 9/12v battery and a couple of leads until you hear the motor bottom out

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Those wifi $50 tools are useful as shit as well. Can force it to retract the electric parking brake. Otherwise for some models you take the cover off of the motor or turn the little thing by hand and it does the same thing.
        Don't just fricking compress the piston!
        And don't turn the parking brake back on if the pads aren't in -> it'll completely keep going and push out the piston for some cars and then youre fricked.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/Cpac0Rk.png

        Those wifi $50 tools are useful as shit as well. Can force it to retract the electric parking brake. Otherwise for some models you take the cover off of the motor or turn the little thing by hand and it does the same thing.
        Don't just fricking compress the piston!
        And don't turn the parking brake back on if the pads aren't in -> it'll completely keep going and push out the piston for some cars and then youre fricked.

        good posts, i've never dealt with electric parking brakes (yet) so i've never really known how to deal with them beyond being aware that they have some procedure for releasing them for servicing.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah don't do this unless you unless you know what voltage they take. Some of them only take 5V and some operate on a digital signal. You can easily fry the motor and it will cost a pretty penny to replace.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i dont do it for german applications but i do for subaru cause germans have autistic ways of doing things
          subaru has some bullshit manual way of doing it

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >-for vehicles without electric handbrakes, a c clamp and an old brake pad make pushing the piston in easy. for electric brakes, i dunno. good luck lol
      If there is a mechanical parking brake on the caliper, no. Those you need to screw in. Electrical ones you can just push in after the electric motor is driven in.
      For regular calipers, the c-clamp is a useless and more difficult procedure. You can just stick a flathead screwdriver between the caliper and rotor and use it to push the piston in, before even dissasembling the caliper. It won't push the piston completely in, but after that you get enough room to stick it between the old pad and rotor and push the rest.
      Also my trick of the day:
      -Open the bleed valve before pushing the piston in. You now don't need to press the fluid backwards through the narrow pipes and the piston goes in with much less force. Now you can feel if the piston sticks even the slightest amount and if you have to do something about that. Also as a bonus you now replace some of the gunky old brake fluild that never gets replaced otherwise

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >For regular calipers, the c-clamp is a useless and more difficult procedure
        lolwut. i did it the other day without too much trouble. you need an old brake pad, and it helps to open the bleeder valve a bit. The screwdriver method was very difficult to do without opening the bleeder valve.
        haven't encountered the mechanical screw-in parking brake though, on mine the parking brake is just a drum brake inside the rear rotors.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >For regular calipers, the c-clamp is a useless and more difficult procedure
        lolwut. i did it the other day without too much trouble. you need an old brake pad, and it helps to open the bleeder valve a bit. The screwdriver method was very difficult to do without opening the bleeder valve.
        haven't encountered the mechanical screw-in parking brake though, on mine the parking brake is just a drum brake inside the rear rotors.

        nvm, i just realised that you had the caliper still on the wheel hub. i forgot to say that the c clamp was for when the caliper is off the hub.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, exactly. Push the piston in before taking the caliper off. Super fast, super easy, all you need is the most simplest tool and it makes taking the caliper off easier too. Especially if the pads attach to the piston and/or caliper with springs like picrel and the rotors are worn and have lip

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    heat helps a lot for bolts/nuts that are corroded or stuck. the trick is applying the heat without damaging rubber/plastic/bodywork nearby

    if you torch a nut (say on a ball joint) until it's just beginning to glow, you have much better chances of getting it loose than at room temperature. the satisfying squeak it makes when it breaks free is just a bonus

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >heat helps a lot for bolts/nuts that are corroded or stuck. the trick is applying the heat without damaging rubber/plastic/bodywork nearby
      True, but beware that heat softens the bolt. There's nothing like dremeling out the bolts connecting your turbo to your downpipe.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Just don't heat suspension parts that you plan on reusing.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Frick all of the penetrating oils and other bullshit like seafoam or brakleen, especially now with Cali enviro regs forcing them to change it to even less useful formulations. Just mix ATF and acetone and you'll get a much usable product. It's what I use for all my projects and have been using for years.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can remove spark plugs from their hole by popping the coil pack back on to lift them out after you ratchet them loose.
    >my spark plugs aren't in an inaccessible hole and the coil pack isn't co-located
    Not much of a problem for you is it then so frick off.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    When disposing of coolant, put it into opaque plastic bottles and pour some old motor oil on top so the recyclers can't tell it's coolant instead of motor oil.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Easier way to dispose of antifreeze is to put it in a bowl at set it out at night if you live in a city.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      An even easier way is to pour it down the toilet. It's ok to put antifreeze in the sewer, no lies. It's actually a recommend way to dispose of it.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        iirc ethylene glycol is one of the easiest chemicals that sewage plants can process/break down. doesn't hurt at all to tip it down the toilet for the average DIYer. if you're dumping industrial/commercial amounts though that might be a different story. also don't do this if you have a septic tank

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A dremel/die grinder with a chainsaw sharpening stone bit or a tungsten carbide cutter is able to cut through tool steel like broken easy outs. Remember this when the despair hits after snapping one off in a rusty exhaust bolt at 3AM.
    Also on the topic of easy outs
    >Don't use them, use heat and penetrate oil first if possible.
    >If you do snap off the bolt, look for LH thread drill bits. If you're lucky you'll wind the bolt out as you drill.
    >If you do have to use an easy out, get the best quality ones you can and ignore the sizing recommendations on the box, use the biggest one that will fit in the bolt hole.
    >Take your time, drill a pilot hole and make sure that fricker is DEAD CENTER on the bolt.
    >Grease on the drill bit will catch metal shavings that might otherwise end up in manifolds or other fricky areas.
    >Trust your gut, if it feels fricked don't push the easy out it will just snap off.
    >If you do manage to get the bolt out, use a tap to clean out the threads.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I have definitely broken easy outs in snapped bolts. A couple of times. The fricking worst. The metal is harder than the original bolt and is a b***h to drill through or grind through.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    if your car wont start and boosting it wont work, tap on your starter with a hammer/wrench and it will usually be enough to get it started (if your starter is starting to go). Eventually though just banging on your starter wont work and you'll have to just replace it, but its gotten me home before in a pinch.

    Tapping your starter+shooting some starter fluid (or basically anything flammable) in the intake is also basically guaranteed to get your car started in the cold even if its -30 and you didn't plug in the block heater

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      kek in our old 94 camry wagon we kept a hammer in the passenger footwell for tapping the starter.
      some odd looks when the occasional non-start happened and randoms would see me pull out a hammer and dip into the engine bay.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Penetrating oils do nothing to break a bolt free, how the frick is a liquid supposed to enter an air tight seal made by the threads? It does however help after the bolt is broken loose when you work the bolt back and forth and allow the oil lube the previously dry threads. Just use a torch if you want a rusted bolt to come out in one piece.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      there are very tiny gaps that are too small for the eye to see, but still big enough to allow fluids to get in via capillary action. but as has been mentioned a few times now, ATF works better than off the shelf penetrants

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Use a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Penetrating oils do nothing to break a bolt free, how the frick is a liquid supposed to enter an air tight seal made by the threads? It does however help after the bolt is broken loose when you work the bolt back and forth and allow the oil lube the previously dry threads. Just use a torch if you want a rusted bolt to come out in one piece.

        Penetrating oil has never once helped me.
        Like he said, it's air tight before it rusted, the rust is basically a gasket added on top of everything.

        The only two things that work are heat and an impact, and I've only ever broken bolts by hand. Once my impact ripped a wheel stud in two. I swear by the impact and if that's not working for h the shit out of it

        I can't believe we're still having this fricking conversation in 2024. Penetrating oil is snake oil. It's a fricking meme. It doesn't work. Get over it.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Wild to me that impacts snap bolts less often.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Go hold on to an impact. It's not as brutal as you expected it to be, it just clicks and shakes like a sex toy.
            The thing that snaps bolts is a static load. Suuure, some bolts that are already all the way rusted through will snap too, but you wouldn't be able to turn them by hand anyway. The impact is magic.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >It's a fricking meme
          that's exactly why im glad i have the ATF lying around. aside from servicing auto gearboxes it just so happens to work as a penetrating oil. Dunno why it doesn't work for you though. My old camry's rear strut bolts were absolutely stuck on, even using the floor jack handle over the breaker bar for more leverage. Dribbled a couple drops of ATF onto both bolts and watched them wick right into the threads. Came back to them 5 mins later and I was able to break them loose.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You probably broke them free right before you gave up.
            Did you try a good impact wrench?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            i didn't have an impact wrench at the time. i wailed on those bolts for a good 5 or so mins. when i got them off, the threads were soaked with the ATF that had wicked itself up into them. it was pretty messy, what with 20 years of crud and shit on them

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The threads have to go over threads you already oiled, if they were dry I'd be concerned on a level that would constitute an existential crisis

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >The threads have to go over threads you already oiled
            Interspatial nut removal? In my garage?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            the wheel hub is secured to the strut with two fat nuts and bolts. i put atf on the nuts and when i took it off the bolt threads at the base/towards the head were soaked

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >penetrating oil doesnt work

          If you used it as directed instead of lubing up your bad dragons...

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Just because you don't notice it or don't give it time to work doesn't mean it is useless, zoomer.
          Try something better than wd-40 and give it more than .04 seconds to soak before throwing a cheater bar on and snapping the bolt off.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You don't work as a mechanic, do you?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don't work at all

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      if they are air tight how do you suppose the air got in to cause the rust in the first place

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        He never said they were water-tight, just airtight. A pound of rust is lighter than a pound of steel.

        • 1 month ago
          DANANA NANA

          A gram of diamonds is like 15 grams
          god I hate aluminium

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            hey hey hey
            goodbye

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            juden juden juden juden

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            NURSES ALL GATHERED ROUND

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      surface tension makes it to creep in

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you have a binded oil filter cap thats stuck, use a hammer and punch to get it loose. Place the punch on a lip of the filter cap (hopefully it has one, otherwise this won't work don't buy that brand of car again or get a replacement cap) then tap the punch with the hammer. You really have to bang it if it's a piece of shit like Toyota, idk how those suckers cement themselves on so hard.

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you don't have a deep socket, put the socket on the bolt by it's self, then attach your ratchet.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ~5" piece of 1/2" PVC. Hacksaw a notch in one end 1/2" deep. Viola, radiator petwiener tool. I've had one in my toolbox for many years.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >torch this
    >penetrating oil that
    SILENCE, BOOMER

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >reading this
    >what kind of vehicle is he in that has trouble cold-starting, has an accessible starter without lifting the vehicle or removing a wheel
    >mentions cosby sauce
    >mentions block heater

    who can it be now?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >who can it be now?
      Peggin leggin?

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    cant be tight if its liquid

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    set your click style torque wrenches to zero for storage

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      ALMOST zero

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It doesn't do anything

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        it relieves tension on the spring so it doesn't go out of calibration

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    /k/
    >springs only wear out through compression cycles so you can leave your magazines loaded, it doesn't matter
    /o/
    >springs wear out from constant compression so you have to unload them when they're not being used, it matters
    The duality of DA.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i'm just following the instruction pamphlet mine comes with

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This is a "mechanic tricks" thread, not a "I read the instructions" thread.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      also creep is a thing too
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creep_(deformation)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >DA
      >springs wear out from constant compression so you have to unload them when they're not being used, it matters
      Never saw that in here

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's literally the post above the one to which you replied?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Depends entire on the material and its use. Magazine springs are not the same thing as the springs and deflecting rods utilized on torque wrenches, nor are magazine springs held under the same extremely precise standards that calibrated tools are.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      both are true, haven't you autistically played with a pen spring before?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        good rule of thumb is 30% less torque value if you need to put any fluid or grease or whatever on the threads. there's a honda model out there where the manual calls for anti seize on the spark plug threads torqued to 18 N m, while ngk specify no anti seize and torque to 25-30 N m. taking 30% off that results in 17-21 N m, bringing it in line with what honda says.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          oops meant to reply to

          putting anything on torque-spec fasteners changes the torque spec
          that is why everyone is taught not to put never-seize on plug threads (and then use factory torque level)

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A leak down tester , can be a very useful tool to seat valves and to also swap a timing belt with out causing internal damage.

    >why

    When you leak air in to the cylinders heads, the air can hold the valves seated up in position.

    Old machinist trick

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine not owning a wrench breaker 3000.

    NGMI.

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