>tfw I'm a mechanical engineer by education and profession. >know nothing about fixing cars

>tfw I'm a mechanical engineer by education and profession
>know nothing about fixing cars

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    good thing that's the mechanic's job, eh?
    >t. fellow mechanical engineer

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      FRICK YOU! GIVE ME MORE CLEARANCE OR YOUR SHIT ASS DESIGNS WILL GET BROKE

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the bean counters say no

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous
    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Weak. This is a self-improvement skill and you are lazy for ignoring it

      Mechanic studying to be a mechanical engineer here, what's it like in the promised land

      Easy. Like most white collar work the core demands are time management and communication with technical ability as a distant 3rd.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Easy. Like most white collar work the core demands are time management and communication with technical ability as a distant 3rd.
        Ain't that the fricking truth. I usually explain it like making a correction or a change to a design takes 15 minutes but dealing with all of the fallout and bullshit around that change (even if it is straightforward like a tolerance change) is about 5-6 months

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >client states fire alarm system is in our scope
          >pm is confused by this and tries to shift it
          >complete year goes by
          >pm asks why we haven't done anything with the fire alarm system
          Bruh

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Give us some juicy info about modern GM vehicles.
        Like just how bad are the CUVs like the traverse.
        I remember back in 2013 or so a friend bought one new and it burned a quart of oil like every 2,000 miles and the dealer told him it was normal lmao.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What do mechanical engineers do? What kind of shit you design? Do you get a team to design something like a simple McDonald's strut or is it a one guy job?

      >t. Mechanic and bodywork man thinking about going back to college for mechanical engineering but I'm unsure if it's worth it

      Also, what CAD do you recommend? I need one that's somewhat fast to learn and can do simple simulations like moving parts, different stresses and failure modes, it's for my ricing and other non shitbox related projects

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm a mechanical drafter, i can't speak for everyone, but 90% of the engineers workload where i work is meetings/emails/paperwork/planing/delegating. If you want to do actual cool shit i would recommend a college degree in mechanical engineering technician/technologist. Also a heads up, if you think you're going to be designing cool shit like race cars think again, a lot of the work is shitwork doing revisions on parts/assemblies + the paperwork that brings, and designing small things like accessories or tools/jigs/dies, especially the first few years of your career. As for CAD software, I learned solidworks at school and use it at work, i like it. Autocad inventor is another common one, theres also fusion 360 which is more geared towards hobbyist, no clue if you can do stress simulations.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >if you think you're going to be designing cool shit like race cars think again, a lot of the work is shitwork doing revisions on parts/assemblies + the paperwork that brings, and designing small things like accessories or tools/jigs/dies
          I imagined it would be like that, few people get to do cool shit.

          It varies. Generally you are assigned to a project but the size of the project defines the scale of the group or whether it's a "you" task.

          The fun: Finding out how to solve the problem, designing the part, testing the part

          The medium tier stuff: Writing specifications or traceability matrixes and filling out documents that only seem to serve to be filled out because someone in QA has a boner for it

          The shit: Standard compliance documents, meetings and endless meetings, trying to explain to managers or project managers that getting 9 women pregnant doesn't get you a baby in a month and all that

          I strongly prefer SolidWorks as a CAD platform and Simscale as an FEM/CFD platform, but Fusion360 and Onshape have been pretty fine and are more easily accessible if you aren't employed somewhere with CAD

          I'm starting to frick around with fusion 360, don't know its full capabilities yet, I'll take a look at your suggestions

          It varies. Generally you are assigned to a project but the size of the project defines the scale of the group or whether it's a "you" task.

          The fun: Finding out how to solve the problem, designing the part, testing the part

          The medium tier stuff: Writing specifications or traceability matrixes and filling out documents that only seem to serve to be filled out because someone in QA has a boner for it

          The shit: Standard compliance documents, meetings and endless meetings, trying to explain to managers or project managers that getting 9 women pregnant doesn't get you a baby in a month and all that

          I strongly prefer SolidWorks as a CAD platform and Simscale as an FEM/CFD platform, but Fusion360 and Onshape have been pretty fine and are more easily accessible if you aren't employed somewhere with CAD

          >The fun: Finding out how to solve the problem, designing the part, testing the part
          That's the part I love, finding solutions, making something then seeing what works and what doesn't, keeping improving it until it's faster/stronger/more reliable or efficient...
          But I hate paperwork like you won't believe

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Do not enter mechanical engineering if you think you won't have to do a lot of paperwork. As I wrote earlier in some cases the ratio is literally 15 minutes of problem solving to 6 months of paperwork and meetings for the solution. Granted I make medical devices which are highly regulated for good reason but you have to be ready for a lot of white collar horse shit

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I'm starting to frick around with fusion 360, don't know its full capabilities yet, I'll take a look at your suggestions
            If you pirate solidworks, i would suggest to block it in the firewall or better yet air-gap the system it's on, dassault systemes are fricking anal about their copyright and i've read people get angry letters in the mail, some small start-ups getting threats of being sued. Honestly this is good advice for any industrial software, these are $5k+ software packages.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don't understand why they ended their "you can have it for free for personal use and learning" program. It's the driving factor in recommending CAD to a beginner that they can try for free. I wrote about this to Dassault and was basically told this market wasn't of interest to them but they totally lack the self awareness there that the reason Engineering graduates like SolidWorks is because they got it for free via their university

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >theres also fusion 360 which is more geared towards hobbyist, no clue if you can do stress simulations.
          You can. I like Fusion better than Solidworks personally. It's built on new code, SW is ancient.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It varies. Generally you are assigned to a project but the size of the project defines the scale of the group or whether it's a "you" task.

        The fun: Finding out how to solve the problem, designing the part, testing the part

        The medium tier stuff: Writing specifications or traceability matrixes and filling out documents that only seem to serve to be filled out because someone in QA has a boner for it

        The shit: Standard compliance documents, meetings and endless meetings, trying to explain to managers or project managers that getting 9 women pregnant doesn't get you a baby in a month and all that

        I strongly prefer SolidWorks as a CAD platform and Simscale as an FEM/CFD platform, but Fusion360 and Onshape have been pretty fine and are more easily accessible if you aren't employed somewhere with CAD

      • 2 weeks ago
        [PLEBSPOTTERS] BigC

        I use solidworks and fusion 360

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It can vary a lot.

        At one company, me and the other engineers got a spec for what a customer wanted and designed the part/machine/system to do what they want. That was the fun part, then we had to act as project managers detailing timelines/cost/suppliers. Managing suppliers was like being a tard wrangler. Not fun.

        At another job I was designing and testing experimental production systems. I was the only engineer and had little accountability so that was nice.

        Now working for a huge mega corporation with existing production systems, everything has been boring. For example, the company wants a new supplier for a part, and their test samples are slightly outside of the tolerance zones on some dimensions. The production guys say it still works, so I have to do a tolerance stackup study to check worst case interactions. If it checks out, I modify the drawing to loosen the tolerance study and submit it, which then goes to another engineer to verify all my work and tick checkboxes and send it to the data management people to check more boxes and give the production people the drawing with updated tolerances so they can accept the parts that they received.
        In another case, we must switch materials for environmental reasons so it becomes a big study of the effects of changing to a slightly different alloy of the same base metal.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Mechanical engineer with 12 years in small aviation here. I've designed control surfaces, wings, fuselages, engine mounts, countless system components, and specialize in direct-effect lightning strike compliance.

        I, too, thought "hey, I like working on cars, but I'm good at math too, let's try mechanical engineering!" The two disciplines are hardly related as others have said.

        Depending on the industry, it's about 25% designing stuff in CAD, and testing, about 50% documentation, compliance demonstration, and revisions, and 25% management. The jobs vary wildly, but this is about standard. Generally, there is a task that needs 1-6 engineers, and you design only a portion of the project to work with the other portions solo or with a small amount of group work.

        The industry standard is Solidworks, with Catia (almost aviation exclusive), Fusion 360, and OnShape being used for modeling, and MSC Nastran / FEMAP for FEM. Rarer are Creo, Rhino, Alias, AutoCAD (mostly electrical stuff).

        It varies. Generally you are assigned to a project but the size of the project defines the scale of the group or whether it's a "you" task.

        The fun: Finding out how to solve the problem, designing the part, testing the part

        The medium tier stuff: Writing specifications or traceability matrixes and filling out documents that only seem to serve to be filled out because someone in QA has a boner for it

        The shit: Standard compliance documents, meetings and endless meetings, trying to explain to managers or project managers that getting 9 women pregnant doesn't get you a baby in a month and all that

        I strongly prefer SolidWorks as a CAD platform and Simscale as an FEM/CFD platform, but Fusion360 and Onshape have been pretty fine and are more easily accessible if you aren't employed somewhere with CAD

        This guy pretty much hit the pros and cons. One thing that isn't mentioned is that you're able to take your knowledge of design and stress analysis into the garage and fab up stuff that won't break, or will identify points of failure / wear that need maintenance, and have a general understanding of how things go together which makes disassembly and assembly easier.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I work in the medical field for a company that designs medical instruments (like x-rays).
        70% paper work & emails, 20% meetings, 5% CAD, 2.5% calculations, 2.5% taking shits on the toilet and getting paid.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Don't forget having to read updates to the QMS that are written because of audit problems except the root cause of the problem had nothing to do with what the QMS update is about, and the root cause is left unsolved

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Average engineer moment

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Mechanic studying to be a mechanical engineer here, what's it like in the promised land

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    At least you aren’t a Poli Sci major

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That's on you, moron. Buy a shitbox and start learning. You took apart shit as a kid and put it back together just because you thought it was fun didn't you? Otherwise you're going to be one of the shit mechanical engineers.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >You took apart shit as a kid and put it back together just because you thought it was fun didn't you?
      Literally me
      t. Mechanical Engineergay

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >sign up for mechanical engineering thinking it means mechanic
    >had to suffer 4 years of insane math

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sounds about right. You could learn it yourself if you want to.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Most engineers know nothing about fixing cars, that's why we end up with shit like this

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is a moronic example. This looks complicated to fix but really isn't. Real examples of engineers that really don't know how to assemble or even have an interest in how to service things are far more stupid. Pic related, Porsche Panamera starter motor location. That's a decision made by someone who doesn't work on the fricking thing, making a very easily understood chain drive system for your valves and cams and pumps isn't.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >This looks complicated to fix but really isn't.
        It's on the back of the block so if the chains, guides, tensioners or anything in that clusterfrick of pumps on the bottom left fails you're dropping the drivetrain out of the car

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah but that doesn't necessarily mean that it's a bad engineering decision or a lack of awareness. These are very high end engines that trickle down into the shitter market slowly. Everyone loves to bring up that pic or even funnier the Ferrari Enzo gear system for the same job, but they are good design choices for the complexity of the engine.

          Bad engineering decisions serviceability wise are on the day to day shit. Like the battery location on a VW Touareg (under the fricking drivers seat) or the endless stream of vehicles with oil drain plugs that are either barely accessible or drain straight onto other components and splash the oil everywhere.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Making the guides entirely out of plastic and making the tensioners purely work on oil pressure with no ratcheting mechanism to keep the tension on the chains were pretty poor engineering decisions
            Only one of those got rectified on later engines

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >tensioners purely work on oil pressure
            lmfao I was not aware of this I take it back

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      they knew but don't care

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm EE, don't work anywhere near the auto industry, got my license and first car at 19, and I taught myself to wrench after graduating because I was tired of paying mechanics for easy shit and diagnosis. I find most engineers like challenges and doing things the hard way, so you'll probably enjoy it even if it sucks sometimes.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I feel lucky to have been trained as a multi-discipline/traditional engineer despite being a zoomer. I did every city and guilds industry qual going for turning, fitting, milling, welding etc. plus electrical and mechanical maintenance then getting my HNC in mech eng. The year I finished my shop floor courses was the year my college got rid of all its machine tools making it feel very bittersweet. I remember shooting the breeze with the lecturers on the last day with the boomer musing about his time in the coal mines and the younger CNC teacher already looking for a new job.

    Not that its helped me have a non-shit career in engineering but at least I can rewire the electrics in friends cars and fix my motorbike.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >be me
    >studying mechanical engineering
    >come to OPs realisation in my final year
    >buy an old 4x4, learn to work on it
    >tons of guys in my class come from honest and good mechanic fathers
    >get knowledge and help from them
    >graduate knowing how to work on my own car and getting a cushy job in a medical device company
    worth

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    As a mechanical engineer you have the income necessary to own a house with a garage and a second car that you can wrench on and the energy left over to wrench on it on weekends.
    Mechanics can just change wheel bearings all the livelong day and drink and stare at a broken 30 year old mustang that needs parts they can't afford on their lawn if they're lucky on the weekend.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    this happens a lot, you know a lot about nothing and at the end of the day you're a wrenchlet and a ricer. You like LEDs?

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I too graduated mechanical engineering, I am working as a mechanic in an abattoir, personally, I like being a grease monkey, and dislike doing the management thing (planning, filling reports etc.), but I do that aswell to help my boss
    I know nothing about actual designing or engineering

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm going to let you in on a secret. Engineers are fricking useless. Your job is to be undermined by penny pinching bureaucrats. Your designs will always be fricked with and ruined by morons. Even if you are one of the good engineers that thinks about the end user and mechanic, you will be hated and damned by those who interact with your creations because other people will desecrate your vision.

    Mechanics can do what you do better. This is why aftermarket modification of cars is popular. You are an artist who creates only for someone else to come in, shit on the canvas, and then hand it off to someone to fix it. If you aren't an alcoholic yet, may as well start now.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah Mr mechanic you're so superior at putting together things engineers developed and researched for you. Get a grip homie. The professions aren't the same and if you're stupid enough to think mounting a turbo is equivalent to developing one you need to lay off the smack

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Give me AutoCAD, too, and I can do your job for you. Cope and sneed.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Nobody uses AutoCAD for mechanical development anymore boomer, welcome to 25 years ago

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >recently graduated mechanical engineer
    >literally just here because of robots, space, mechanisms and heavy math
    >like car mechanisms and theory, fricking hate actually driving and/or dealing with cars irl
    >live in car-dominated country with almost no high tech industry, and almost no development work whatsoever

    looks like academia it is

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You won't be doing any "heavy math" in a job.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        yeah, unless you're in a research and development position, which you often need a masters/phd to get.
        tbh academia can be pretty comfy sometimes so i'm not even mad

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Nearly all complex problems are now solved numerically with a finite element solver.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            well yeah, in a real industrial setting, making machines for real people to use, of course you're gonna use a numerical solver (that's part of the "fun part" of the job). i mean i'm not expecting to solve for stresses in a crankcase geometry lol

            but still, someone has to learn the theory behind that solver, someone has to develop said solver, someone has to develop the numerical method for said solver (usually those are unpaid PhDs or people working for a small-scale startup that specializes in one specific problem (which, if successful, are usually then bought by ANSYS or w/e)).
            i mean really, even for FEM there's a huge amount of math and approximation theory and functional analysis going behind the scenes for (belytschko, hughes, etc) to actually prove that their numerical schemes converge and can approximate "decently enough" the real problem.
            and there are still many open problems that we can't just realistically brute force via adding more nodes/elements (not to mention inverse problems, that is, to actually design a part, or a machine). ideally that's where theory and practice come together.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Most companies will just use the standard solver (Abaqus, ANSYS, etc) and they won't even do complicated meshes because time/cost > everything else.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            To be honest in most cases outside of perhaps aerospace where weight saving is king you aren't exactly dealing with edge cases in safety factor either. We make this rack cabinet for a thing that's about 30 kgs and the rack cabinet is about 2mm stainless steel painted for looks. Got asked several times why noone has calculated the strength on it or done FEM by people that know engineers are supposed to do things like this but have no idea what it actually means and like.... a 2mm stainless steel box holding 30 kg in a stationary location homie it's not gonna be a problem

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            My company just uses the built in Solidworks solver. It's good enough.

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For all the dudes that like to do stuff for fun in their spare time i can highly recommend Simscale. They understand the whole "letting people use your product for free means they will recommend it to their workplace", so you can play with shit you don't get to do on your day to day but it's free. At least as long as you use it for non commercial useage. Pic related, screenshot a shitty Pikes Peak car project I did 2 years ago

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I have pirated FEA software on my computers at home for hobby shit.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is this an in browser solver?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yes. Upload the step or sldprt or whatever and you run the simulation in browser at a render farm. No need for hardware locally for it so you can just ignore it while it runs

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          How good is the documentation?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Pretty good. You have both some step by step setup cases and explanations of every step and how to change for something else etc, but they also offer onboarding. Cost isn't moronic either for professional use, less than a single license of any of the normal software packages. I wanna say I'm not affiliated with them at all, I'm just having fun with it.

            Technically behind the scenes its running eg. OpenFOAM (you get the whole solver output text file too) but the UI makes it much easier to set up, similar to using the integrated tools in eg. Solidworks in my personal opinion. I really like it. Check these if it sounds interesting: https://www.simscale.com/docs/tutorials/

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah cool, I'll look into it. I wonder if switching to this would be cheaper for my company compared to what we use now, I'm always trying to reduce costs and get the best price-performance products. The fact it's cloud based is actually a big plus.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's been how I sold it too. Not having to deal with the hardware locally is a huge plus, and personally I always thought "haha i'm waiting for the solver" got old real fast when you just have to sit and wait for your PC to do its thing

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    participate mechanical engineering studies, make profession, never fix anything ever

    real europoor lucky if spareparts new

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