Want to get into camping, should I learn about basic car repair?

Want to get into camping, should I learn about basic car repair?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I wanted to get into playing guitar, so I took various woodworking classes but I'm still shit at guitar??

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not to start with, you should learn that later when you want to drive to isolated places. The first things you want to learn is about shelters (bivvys, tents, hammocks) fire starting & safety + camp cooking, and packing for food, clothing in case the weather changes, and parks around you that have decent places to camp. Then once you start camping, you can look at the more remote stuff depending on what you want to do: Do you want to chill at camp in nature and read/relax? Do you want to fish, hunt, practice navigation/orienteering, birdwatch, study insects/plants etc

      Ignore this moronic c**t, there are no stupid questions only stupid answers

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Stupid questions have stupid answers

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Ignore this moronic c**t, there are no stupid questions only stupid answers

        Stupid questions have stupid answers

        >Stupid questions have stupid answers

        Simple as.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >and remember kids, there is no stupid questions, just stupid people

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >is

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's true but their questions aren't stupid if they genuinely don't know. My point stands. Every question can reasonably be asked, how the frick do you think philosophy came about?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Navel gazing reply

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      unironically yes

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    research main reasons for car breakdowns on long trips
    learn to fix those things

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >car breakdowns on long trips
      2 summers ago I drove across North America and back. About 10000 km in total. Zero (0) car issues.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        What kind of car?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          McLaren f1

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Not him but I drove to cali and back from the east coast to pick up a project car (almost 6k miles). I drove a 2002 gmt800 with 400k miles and was rusting apart towing a large trailer. I had zero issues the entire trip with the truck, my trailer broke a spring but i just pretended nothing was wrong and made it back ok.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >gmt800
            doubt
            if you wouldve said a lil yoter id believe you

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            *rusts in half*

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >he fell for the nip truck meme
            lmao

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >corvair wagon
            Megabased

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            thanks mate, corvairs are great DA vehicles.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            https://i.imgur.com/7BHgITt.jpg

            thanks mate, corvairs are great DA vehicles.

            > he fell for the YouTube algorithm

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I wouldn't go camping unless you at least know how to change your timing belt. Bare minimum.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get a portable jumpstarter and keep spare fluids handy.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >fluids

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oil, coolant and windshield juice

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Pulp or no pulp?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            some pulp

    • 2 months ago
      Bepis

      This.

      I recommend an inflator and learning how to plug tires too. If you have a nail or a bad thorn or some bullshit in your tire, plugging the thing is often easier than putting on the spare.

      Zip ties, duct tape… spare fuses, a couple feet of wire, and a test light or cheap multimeter can often help you work around a sensor or switch that shits out on you.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >fatherless behavior.
    if you own and drive a car at all you should take the time to know these things anyway

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you are honestly and legitimately worried about back country camping and car issues there's very little besides basic stuff to worry about. You are not replacing a water pump or a u joint in the woods. Your first line of problem solving is don't have a problem. Make sure your car is good working order before you leave. If are concerned about contacting help, besides a phone just let someone know when you'll be back and when they should call someone to check. If very concerned this is a good if expensive case for an InReach or some other satellite comm device that you can use to send a prerecorded message "Car Trouble at trailhead" or whatever along with your coordinates. For the DIYer in you;

    1. Know how to jump the car. Highly recommend in general people buy a portable jump. I have one well over powered for my car so I could jump basically anything and it was under 100 bucks. This is better than cables because you do not need another vehicle. It also acts as a colossal back up battery for the phone or other electronics.
    2. Know how to put air in the tires and potentially take it out. A super basic 12v pump is under 20 bucks, a little more gets you a digital pump. And if you are somehow stuck in poor ground conditions you can improve your car's grip a bit by letting air out of the tires.
    3. Know how to recover the car. Cars have recovery points front and rear. Most have some kind of big threaded eyelet that you put into the frame so that hooks and recover straps can be connected. This is useful to know so that if someone else has a vehicle handy they can potentially drag you out. But you can also self recover a lot of situations. A final thing you may want to have (and that I keep handy all winter at minimum) are traction pads. They are again not expensive (40 bucks for a good set) and they just provide a large, grippy surface area for your tires so you can get out of a mud hole or sand pit.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is a good point, preventative maintenance but also a basic check over before you leave. You can get out of the woods with a lot of problems, and you can't do anything about critical engine failure. So think about what might keep you there and quickly check if it's sturdy: axles & hubs (the rest of the driveline like diffs, propshafts, gearbox will give you fair warning before breaking and you're not carrying spares anyway), fuel & ignition components, brakes, and you're set. You CAN drive on a flat, with fricked suspension, while overheating etc;

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Want to get into cooking, should I learn about basic woodworking?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >because nobody ever uses a car to get to DA, amirite guys?
      >guys?
      >h-hello?

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You should learn basic car repair, period.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    dont bother cars especially ice cars are a dying concept not worth waisting your time and effort on

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You should already know that, doesn't have anything to do with camping though.
    Learn to diagnose and fix your shit, that's pretty basic I think.
    No matter if it's your car, computer or your fricking washing machine, be able to help yourself.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Along with the other good advice above, quality tires including the spare are invaluable, and walk any section of road that looks sketchy before driving it. Learn to recognize the types of rocks such as volcanic glass, chalcedony, or chert that will destroy your tires. Carry chains if there's a remote possibility of snow. Carry a shovel for sand or snow. Carry a tow strap, it'll save your ass eventually. Also, always have enough money in the bank to cover the towing bill from a remote area. These are basic "things to prevent you from abandoning your car 50 miles from town" but it should help.

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