what a misused technology.

what a misused technology. it should have been miniaturized and used to run accessories at a constant RPM in a car with a normal driveline transmission

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Or to run a supercharger.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's counterproductive. Directly driven supercharger linearly increases airflow with RPMs and matches the linear increase of the airflow requirement. There's zero reason to do it any other way.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sometimes you want to be at high rpm and part throttle. Seems like it would be more efficient when you're not flooring it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >There's zero reason to do it any other way.
        Yes there is. Eliminating the parasitic loss. If you already have a another source of power available, you don't need to take power from the engine to run the supercharger.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        airflow is dependent on both RPM and throttle position though, which is why superchargers have always been a mistake and turbochargers rule the roost.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        hello moron department? turns out all the manufacturers trying to spool a turbo as early as possible got it wrong

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ...Huh. I think you might be onto something, anon. We've been having problems with supplying enough power to computers in our self-driving development mules, right now it's solved by making the alternator pulley smaller, which is fine while we're testing in the city but we can't test on the highway like that because the alternator overheats. A CVT might actually let us do both.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No point, just have an electric motor/generator integrated into the engine, and remove the parasitic losses entirely.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what do you mean... like the crankshaft is also a rotor? where do you put the stator then?
      and it's way too hot. heat pretty much eliminates magnetic flux.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what do you mean... like the crankshaft is also a rotor? where do you put the stator then?
      and it's way too hot. heat pretty much eliminates magnetic flux.

      Toyota already does this

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        that's in the troony

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No point in even having a physical transmission attached to the internal combustion engine now. Just have an electric transmission like the original Porsche designs.
          The engine just generates electricity, the KERS also just generates electricity unless you need 4WD.
          The buffer battery stores electricity, the electric supercharger helps make more electricity when necessary.
          With an electric motor that puts the power out as efficiently as possible.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            bro shut the frick up you moronic homosexual, can't believe I read this shit

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That's called a series hybrid.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            If the engine was the only source of power, yes.

            The addition of the KERS, in this case an electric motor on the front axle that normally sits idle, that can decelerate the car by generating electricity makes it a more complicated parallel hybrid setup, even if the parallelization is somewhat weak.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Not Honda's IMA (Integrated Motor Assist) implementation, which was actually available with a manual transmission. It goes between the crankshaft and flywheel, and doubles as the engine's starter.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Kinda moronic question but, would it be possible to implement the IMA in another car that has enough space to support it? Was thinking of doing a custom hybrid and using the IMA as a thought experiment. Figured it'd be good to provide instant speed off the line then switch over to the hypothetical 6 inline

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Easiest way to do it is bolting chinesium e-wheels to the back of an fwd car and hooking up a motor/controller and battery pack

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The car I have is RWD (more specifically a 280zx) so I'm not sure if that would work. I figured by sandwiching the IMA in between it would provide some assist to shift up quickly.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Kinda moronic question but, would it be possible to implement the IMA in another car that has enough space to support it? Was thinking of doing a custom hybrid and using the IMA as a thought experiment. Figured it'd be good to provide instant speed off the line then switch over to the hypothetical 6 inline

            I'm interested in EV conversions and apparently DIY hybrids are a c**t and a half to build because it is very hard to get the ICE and electric powertrain to play together nicely. You usually end up with one of the two working against the other.

            Unless you strictly switch between one mode and the other and don't use them in parallel, I guess.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            This is why ideas centering around having an engine but no physical linkage are coming back. It solves a lot of problems.
            Just like having an engine solves all the problems for home built BEVs right now like range, and lack of fast charging support.

            I need to think more seriously about the concept of a multiple motorcycle based series hybrid powertrain.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            How do you access that oil filter

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Underneath, or the wheel well?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Motor-Transmission management is a fine art that is not well understood by a lot of manufacturers.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nice time stamp

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If Formula 1 didn't outlaw it. They would have become the hottest shit in sports cars.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It was because they said no automatic shifting, right? Well what if they use something like boat throttles to let the driver control the "shifting"?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >It was because they said no automatic shifting
        No, F1 cars have been automatic shifters for decades, or at least semi-automatic. The driver uses the paddles to select the target gear, then the transmission shifts to that target gear at the optimal points. You can see this in the wienerpit views of a F1 race when hitting the end of a straightaway, the driver will bang the downshift paddle several times as he brakes for the curve, but listening to the engine you'll hear that usually only the first and second transmission shift will correspond to the paddle input, the others happen later.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    like others ITT have mentioned, switching to electrically driven accessories is the answer. M256 for example

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