What's your philosophy on spark plugs?

What's your philosophy on spark plugs? I would rather buy platinum plugs and replace before 50k or so, rather than leaving iridium plugs in for 100k. Yeah the irridium plugs work for 100k but the gap decreases and the plug looks like shit soon after 50k.

And the cost of plugs is so fake, what they do is they still market the old plugs to justify the new iridium plugs being more expensive rather than phasing out all the old copper/platinum stuff and lowering the cost.

Also, does anyone use autolite plugs? Where are they made and are they a good buy?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Also wanted to ask if you can run things like bosch, autolite, or other brands besides denso and NGK in a Toyota because Honda has a real problem with Bosch.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I run the cheapest coppers available, usually Autolite. Never had an issue.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I wouldn't run copper because it's annoying how copper expands the gap over time, you have to adjust like every 15k. Platinum is great.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Copper plugs

        I never checked them on my Tahoe and didnt have an issue until the electrodes were completely gone. The entire tool fit inside the gap at that point.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      copper core plugs make more power.
      but don't last as long.
      so if your car is a pain to change plugs, don't use copper core.

      No, a BMW. Runs the best on coppers so I've stuck with them.
      Actually it's not even every 10k km, but more like every 5k or so when I change my oil. Usually the old plugs go into whatever shitbox that might need plugs

      Copper plugs

      I never checked them on my Tahoe and didnt have an issue until the electrodes were completely gone. The entire tool fit inside the gap at that point.

      Unless your setup regularly fouls plugs, downgrading from a long life plug to copper has absolutely zero demonstrable benefit and is a complete waste of time, effort, and money.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I can spend $18 on plugs that will last longer than I own the vehicle, or $60 on plugs that will last longer than I own the vehicle, and literally no one else will ever give a frick that it only has copper plugs

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just get oem (usually NGK) and change them every 60k miles or so, they're never even that dirty, just did them last month.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Buy NGK. Normal type unless they are b***h to work on(transverse v6, modulars with shit threads, etc) then go iridium.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My shitbox has 140k miles and I don't think the spark plugs have ever been replaced.

    How bad is that

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What year is your car? Tuneups are cheap if you do them yourself, and expensive if you bring it in.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        2000. I do most of the work myself but getting to the sparkplugs looks painfully long so I'm waiting until I have time off.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've experienced chucking new plugs into high mile, old shitboxes and found that they ran a decent amount better.

      Then again, it might make little difference.

      Normal NGK plugs cost very little.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      your car went from 120 factory horsepower to like 90
      change em and behold the POWA

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I only buy copper plugs and I actively seek out copper plugs when none are listed for any of my cars.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My V8 car requires removal of a huge amount of shit for replacing the rear most two plugs so I used Iridium NGKs for my last plug job.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    have you tried not being autistic

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    All spark plugs are "copper" plugs due to the use of copper inside of the core
    No spark plugs use copper exposed as an electrode.
    Electrodes are only made from: nickel, platinum, iridium, ruthenium

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >50k miles
    what are you a brokie? driving for 50k miles in a car? just get a new one LOOLL

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Have you never been in love?

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I run NGK coppers. Copper conducts electricity better than every other plug type at the expense of durability, but that's a non-issue when they're $1.78 each and take 5 minutes to change. Never buy autolites, they're fricking garbage. They can't even make the ground straps straight.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I changed the NGK Iridium plugs that I've had for like 40K km and they looked like crap on a hard-driven BMW N52.

    I don't see these lasting 100K miles unless all you do is cruise on the highway driving the speed limit.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >nobody itt runs an MSD or equivelant and it shows.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The 1970 Chevelle SS454 used a traditional single point with no extras.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I have an msd. I don't have to worry about fouling plugs because of it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i have an msd 8239 for a dodge neon srt4 on my slowbaru

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i run a solid state HEI coil for a vg30/ka24/sr20 in place of an oil coil on my 22re, that thing is able to bite you so hard you feel it for an hour.
      genuinely one of the best junkyard upgrades i've done.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        HEI like out of a chevy? Interesting.
        My dad liked the old Bosch coil controller modules. Free at junkyards and seemed to work well.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Everywhere online lists this coil as HEI so that's what I called it, it hangs out where the stock oil coil lived next to the igniter but was plug n play with my existing ignition wires.
          I'm having to work around toyota's TCCS system and their unique to this engine/ecu 8 wire igniter, but im slowly taking steps to replace it with a much newer and more standard 5 wire igniter.

          https://i.imgur.com/feMYFmB.png

          what does DA think about E3 spark plugs?

          Kind of a meme, their biggest advantage they list is un-shrouding/side-gapping spark plugs, but then they shroud even more of the ignition area with the ground strap so it'd negate all possible positive effects. Some people say they work but I think they're snake oil.
          Un-shrouding spark plugs does in fact work to a very small degree. I tried it because hey, if it doesn't work and ruins my idle, new plugs are cheap. Snipped the ground strap where it bends off, reinstalled, noticed a slightly smoother idle so I shrugged and decided to just run them.
          Now that i've ran them for a while, it idles so smooth you'd think it has a balance shaft and I even have the idle turned down ~250 rpm from factory.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >but then they shroud even more of the ignition area with the ground strap so it'd negate all possible positive effects
            I think I know what you;re talking about, on my last car the e3 plug had a big piece of metal over the whole top which seemed weird to me. the ones for my new car look completely different, pic related. how does this design look to you? I just bought the car at 50k miles, so I'm thinking i should get new plugs, and the e3s at 6.99 each are actually cheaper than most options

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have these in my 302 Ford. Works pretty good. If the plugs were harder to access I would use a longer lifespan plug.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Autolite is OEM for some Ford stuff, but outside of that are considered the McDonald's of spark plugs. I run denso or NGK Iridium plugs in most cars, sometimes I'll get the ruthenium plugs if working on something a little sportier. I don't know if they make a difference but the customer feels good spending a couple bucks to get fancy new exotic tech plugs.

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I buy the highest performance and gap them myself because NGK for some reason never gaps them correctly for the application.
    Wire type spark plug gapper tools >>>> every other spake plug gapper

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use OEM I haven’t had problems with them yet. If I have to replace them early I might try the same brand, but fool me twice shame on me, I’m getting something that lasts longer.
    I think I need to replace my coil packs and the same thing applies.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Spark plugs?

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Change spark plugs back in 2014
    >Just went to autozone and picked the "longer lasting ones" the clerk told me
    >Had a buddy put them in for me who was always working on his old Jeep
    >Now 2024
    >100k miles later
    >Same sparkplugs still running

    >Go to shop and get an oil change
    >"When was the last time you changed your spark plugs?"
    >"about 10 years ago"
    >you wot mate look from mechanic

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >install surface gap plugs
    >never ever change them
    >profit

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1) Use the OEM spec plug from the OE supplier
    There is a long number and almost always a short number. The long number is the detailed spec of the spark plug in the supplier's code, the short number is the stocking number for ordering. One of my cars specs ILZFR6D11, so it gets NGK 1208. Another specs RV17YC, so it gets Champion 25. Brands like Autolite or E3 will mash all these specs together into a few "if it fits it ships" SKU for their own convenience. Dogshit.

    Exceptions: If the OE is something odd like Yura, most of the time an equivalent NGK works just as well. There are some applications like Mercedes direct injection plugs or some newer Hondas where you can actually only get the correct plug from the dealer even though it's from a mainstream supplier.

    2) Replace at owners manual maintenance interval
    There is no point in changing spark plugs early otherwise, barring things like porcelain breakage or being in there already for another repair.

    Exceptions: boosted engines that are running higher boost than stock, or engines that burn a major amount of oil (like a quart every 1000 miles)

    3) If you're working on an old car (or a very low quality modern car) that specs a nickel/copper plug, you may as well upgrade to the same plug but single or double platinum.
    An example is the Chrysler World Engine, which specs a basic ass ZFR5F-11. A single platinum ZFR5FGP costs barely more, so why not make the service interval a little more neglect-proof. Don't expect to automatically get a modern 100k interval in an old engine just by throwing an iridium plug in, especially on engines with wasted spark ignition.

    4) You are overthinking
    If you're not running 75hp or more than stock, don't touch the heat range. Don't post pictures of your old, light tan colored spark plugs online and expect people to "read" them in any meaningful way. Don't read spark plug reviews online, they are NEVER helpful. Don't downgrade tip material type

    5) None the above applies to race engines

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I only run copper that I replace every 10k km or about 6000 miles.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Do you drive a Model T? This honestly sounds moronic.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No, a BMW. Runs the best on coppers so I've stuck with them.
        Actually it's not even every 10k km, but more like every 5k or so when I change my oil. Usually the old plugs go into whatever shitbox that might need plugs

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Do you drive a Model T? This honestly sounds moronic.

      Copper has the best conduction, all the coatings just increase longevity. I run copper in my track day rx7. Swap with every oil change.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The conduction difference between a copper plug and a platinum/iridium is bullshit on a street car. Tens of kilovolts make it completely negligible.

        Changing plugs often in a tracked rotary engine is completely different than that guy replacing plugs in a regular BMW engine every 6k miles for no reason

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have a wasted spark ignition so double ground plugs it is. The NGK platinum ones.
    O don't mess with them until the car starts misfiring. Usually at 60-80k

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    copper core plugs make more power.
    but don't last as long.
    so if your car is a pain to change plugs, don't use copper core.

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Greased Geese

    i buy the ones that thread into the cylinderhead.

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Which element after Ruthenium will be the next big thing in spark plugs?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Gold

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Does age matter a lot?
    My car is 11 years old with 24k miles should i replace the plugs?

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    what does DA think about E3 spark plugs?

  29. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Follow the damn manual.
    G0YSV

  30. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i just buy whatever and change them whenever

  31. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Double platinum NGK

  32. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Multi tip plugs are a bit of a meme, anything more than two is wasted effort.
    What happens as a multi-electrode plug wears/dirties is one is better/cleaner than the other and has less resistance, so the spark tends to always go from that one. It's quite common to find worn out 2-tips that have an electrode with over 80% remaining while the one that for whatever reason was used the most is nearly evaporated. While the 2nd tip still has 80% material left, the plug gets so carboned/dirtied that the good tip just isn't functional anymore either.
    4-point plugs are a complete waste of money and actually make performance suffer due to heat absorption and flame front blocking.

    Just buy your OEM part plug (but dont pay OEM prices) chances are if those plugs lasted for 120k+ miles they were picked for a good reason. My engine specs NGK dual tip iridiums and with 138k on the factory originals, I will be replacing them Soon™ , but I don't have spark plug problems yet.
    I'll post pics eventually when I do swap them to show what a modern dual tip iridium does to itself over such a high mileage use.

    tl;dr just buy the OEM part, whatever place has that ACTUAL OEM part the cheapest. Dont overthink it.

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