Why do most luxury cars, even sedans, still come in RWD?

Why do most luxury cars, even sedans, still come in RWD? Is there something i'm missing for why they won't make the switch?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    FWD is for homosexuals

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      IF IT AINT REAR YOURE A QUEER

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    4wd and awd are switched

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      nope

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Most luxury sedans are awd

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Awd is dumb if you dont NEED it. I especially don't like how the tires need to all have the same thread wear or else you burn out diffs. It's extra maintenance. All this is great if you need it. But most people don't ever need it.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It mostly depends on the company and what their goal has been. Cadillac went fwd for most of the 90s into the 2000s. Lincoln also went fwd for a lot of cars as well later on, and volvo has been doing it too. Depending on if the company makes performance/track variants is what really determines if their platforms will go to transverse layout. Lincoln makes no sports car while cadillac does. Audi makes a handful of high performance models but remains mostly transverse. Volvo makes no high performance stuff, so there's nothing to lose with transverse. Companies simply want to allow more cabin space while offering awd, which is much easier to do without sacrificing handling in a transverse layout. Cadillac only has rwd stuff cause 90% of their market is V cars and escalades, with a handful of lower price cts/ats/etc. Its all about whats already been around and what sells for a company. Selling what works is easier than retooling and mass producing something you don't know will sell

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Lincoln Town Car never went FWD, it stayed RWD until it rode off into the sunset in 2011. I understand your point though

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The Lincoln Town Car never went FWD, it stayed RWD until it rode off into the sunset in 2011. I understand your point though

        Yes but after the town car ended in 2011 with the shutdown of the panther line, everything else was FWD. The Lincoln MKZ based off the Fusion is a front wheel drive car. Even when Lincoln brought back the Continental name for 2017-2020 and had a proper full size luxury car, they still had it as FWD because it was essentially just an elongated fusion. Now, that being said you could get it in AWD and with the 3.0tt it's a good setup, but it wasn't rear wheel drive based like other luxury cars like modern Mercs, BMWs, Lexus, Audi, etc

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the switch to what

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    do you need to understand every trend in every car you dont own

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Well only BEVs are considered luxury these days, and the least expensive setup for a BEV is RWD.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Is there something i'm missing for why they won't make the switch?
    RWD is the default set up for optimal driving performance and feel.
    FWD was invented because it's easier to package into economy cars.
    The question is why did economy cars make the switch from RWD to FWD? Because it's easier to package a FWD car.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    READ ME

    It's because RWD proportions - a long hood and haunched rear 3/4ths, looks good first of all. Also driving characteristics for RWD are better at 10/10ths limit than FWD.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      "READ ME"
      how to identify a moronic post quickly

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    plebs can’t handle RWD, so they reserve it for patricians

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    awd has one serious flaw since the beginning of it that i can't believe nobody's overcome yet:
    when you're stuck in mud or snow or sand or any other not-4-wheels-on-dry-pavement conditions, instead of sending power to all the wheels, it sends power to none of them.
    it's so unbelievably moronic, i can't believe it ever made it past the drawing board. it's not even a design flaw or something inherent to the system itself. they literally make it that way on purpose. all it would take to fix it is probably a few extra lines of code in whatever bullshit traction-control module runs that shitshow.
    i had a subaru outback that slipped off the edge of my driveway couple winters back. one wheel on the pavement, with a little ice under about 1/2" of snow, and three wheels on frozen earth with the same 1/2" of snow on top of it. for the life of me, i couldn't get the car to get back up on the driveway. every time one of the tires started to hop up over the "curb" (my driveway sits about 2" higher than my lawn), the tire about to go over the top would stop spinning, some other one would start, and i'd skid sideways down the driveway, inching closer and closer to a tree.
    in the end, i tied up to an f150 - not even in 4wd in the same "adverse" conditions - and that thing pulled me back on to my driveway at an idle. didn't even give it any gas.
    what's even the point of something like that?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Just open diff things

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      turn off traction control dumbass

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Objectively superior driving dynamics, also it's much harder to fit the kind of engines people want in luxury cars
        >V8
        >V12
        >maybe an I6
        in an FF layout. Plus a big torquey luxury V8 in a FF configuration will torque steer which is very not luxurious. Volvo did a transverse I6 in the S80 many years ago, and continues to sell FF luxury cars, but they don't sell very well.

        nah it was his open diff

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like you need one of these

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >instead of sending power to all the wheels, it sends power to none of them.

      this doesnt happen with any awd car ever, wtf are you on about? even with open diffs it would always send power to the wheel with less resistance, what you described would only happen if it had no propshaft whatsoever.

      >every time one of the tires started to hop up over the "curb" (my driveway sits about 2" higher than my lawn), the tire about to go over the top would stop spinning, some other one would start

      yeah your car is broken

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Depends on the system, but yeah. Open diff.

      https://i.imgur.com/fegi5Nj.jpeg

      Why do most luxury cars, even sedans, still come in RWD? Is there something i'm missing for why they won't make the switch?

      In FWD the front tyres are doing everything. Turning, Braking, Accelerating. Plus they have 70% of the weight of the car (depending on the configuration) AWD has the benefits from FWD and RWD, the only cons are they weight more+more drivetrain loses, well also + price for extra parts

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because trannies are for poors

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because we are no longer in the era where you can get cheap rwd econoboxes. nor are we in the era where a l6 is the poverty option and a v8 is the norm

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Pr/o/zempic

    torque steer is not a luxury feature, nor is a transaxle

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    FWD is for poor people concerned with fuel economy and who can't afford a big car. RWD means a bigger engine can be fitted, and the loss of interior space from the propshaft tunnel can be countered by simply making the car bigger. Both of which are only things wealthy people can afford these days.

    Friendly reminder the eurotrash "bigger doesn't equal better" cope is just sour grapes. It's because they can't afford a bigger car, so they have to convince themselves that a little shoebox is "better anyway". There's a reason why their kings ride around in V12 Rolls Royces and Maybachs.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The FWD oldsmobile and cadilacs of the 60s and 70s had 425 cu inches engines or bigger, i'm sure engine size isn´t a problem for fwd drivetrains. Torque steer also wasn't a problem for them either even though they had over 475 lbs of torque and weighed over 4500 pounds.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        torque steer is not an issue in any longitudinal FWD drivetrain (i.e. Audi, Subaru, classic Saab) because the half shafts are the same length

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          trannies can have equal length shafts too with this one simple trick

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