Why does it seem like no one fricking knows anything about transmission fluid changes?

Why does it seem like no one fricking knows anything about transmission fluid changes?

A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

UFOs Are A Psyop Shirt $21.68

A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

  1. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    >auto transvestite

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      legit brain rot

  2. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Sharticles of aluminum get stuck in the various valving when you drain it so no one want to do them

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      If you've got shavings in your valve body it's already beyond fricked. What do think the filter is for? it's filtering the fluid before it enters the valve body not afterwards.

      • 7 days ago
        Anonymous

        jeez, don;t change it then, creep

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      No, this is why you drain and fill and DO NOT ever flush an automatic transmission.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Well if there's aluminum in your valve body, then you've already had failure somewhere. The only thing that should be in your pan is steels and clutch material.

  3. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    its almost completely unnecessary

  4. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    they've got lifetime fluid so why bother

  5. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    normalgays dont know shit about anything but muh scrolling phone

  6. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    basic rule is to either keep up with oil changes every 50k or dont change it at all cause the troony clutch packs would be worn out at ~120k and the friction material floating around in the old oil is whats keeping the troony from slipping.

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      I know you meant transmission fluid, not oil and it's every 30k miles, though at 50k you could still change it. The idea is that if it becomes gritty from neglect, it may be helping the clutch grab and changing it after no changes for 50k miles could result in a slipping clutch.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        >transmission fluid
        >not oil
        You're so god damn dumb.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          the fluid in an automatic transmission isnt gear oil like in a manual transmission. its has oil n it and alot of other shit. you are fricking ignorant and a wiener

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >trans fluid isn't an oil
            Yes, yes I am an ignorant wiener.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          When you say "oil" everyone knows you mean engine oil. The stuff in your transmission is called transmission fluid or sometimes brake fluid. If you want to words in ways that isn't how they're used, then you aren't speaking the same language.

          Fun fact, for a lot of motorcycles the transmission fluid and engine oil are the same. The oil is shared among the transmission, engine and a wet clutch. Motorcycle oil also have special additives letting it do this and costs considerably more.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            the fluid in an automatic transmission isnt gear oil like in a manual transmission. its has oil n it and alot of other shit. you are fricking ignorant and a wiener

            Hydraulic fluid is oil.
            That's it, that's what it is.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            None of what you said invalidates the fact that transmission fluids ARE MADE OUT OF OIL.

            Fricking morons filled the world I swear to God.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            It's an entirely moot point because of the context you double dumb frick. "eh, acktualhy it is an oil" is a stupid thing to say and irrelevant. Go ask anyone what you mean by change an engine's oil and see what they say you acne faced fedora wearing autismo.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            YOU. HAVE. UNO.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        It's different by vehicle, and use and abuse, not a blanket 30k numbnuts. Can't begin to explain how many 200-300k mile units we've had that saw one, or no fluid changes in their lives.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        30k is cvt interval because they're just that shit.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >the friction material floating around in the old oil is whats keeping the troony from slipping.
      complete and utter boomer fud.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        ase certified master mechanic, but lets go with what you know instead.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Damn so what if they made transmission fluid with clutch material in it that you could put back in? Why doesn't anyone capitalize on this billion dollar idea? Could it be that "muh friction material" is complete fricking bullshit and if it's fricked or not fricked, changing the fluid doesn't actually hurt anything?

      oh I skipped over where you said exactly that in a lot less words: [...]
      >disconnect a line and start the vehicle

      Lol so just do that then you pussy stop acting like a transmission fluid change is fricking rocket science, literally one of the easiest jobs I've done on my car.

  7. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Manufacturers want you to have a cheaply built but problem free transmission that will last to about 100k miles and then permanently die. This allows you to buy a new car without needing the warranty and then provide them a trade in they can sell, which will last just long enough for it's buyer to not blame the dealership selling it when it dies.

    To this end, they invented the "sealed transmission" that the manufacturers say does not need a fluid change "for the life of the transmission". The life of the transmission being as described above. If you want it to last longer, then you need to change the fluid but the manufacturer, wanting you to not do that, does not include a dipstick or any way to check the fluid level. You basically have to take it somewhere with special equipment.
    ...which is why
    >no one fricking knows anything about transmission fluid changes

  8. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    >Why does it seem like no one fricking knows anything about transmission fluid changes?
    because automakers claim this last "forever" when in reality they are claiming this last for as long as a car should be ridden before being replaced by a new one (5 years or 150000km)

    Tl;Dr they want the car to break so you buy new.

  9. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    >people that know how to take care of cars tell you changing transmission fluid id good and should be done regularly for the life of the car
    >people that don't know how to take care of cars tell you it should never be changed or you destroy the transmission
    One of these groups should be listened to, I'll leave it up to you to decide which.

    On a side note, at 170k miles I finally started getting material on the drain bolt magnet, I'm kind of sad. I still just wiped it off and changed the fluid and it's running the same as ever, it didn't magically explode like the people that want you to buy a new car every year tell you.

  10. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    As a mechanic, it's because nobody ever thinks to change the fluid until there's something wrong with it, then by the time it's acting up new fluid isn't gonna fix shit, and if we do it and it still misbehaves after, the customer is going to blame us for it when their 150k mile poorly maintained piece of shit just needed a transmission rebuild from the get go, but because we touched it it's our headache now. So it's easier just to tell the customer we don't do it.

    • 5 days ago
      Anonymous

      My broken transmission is still broken after you performed the service I told you to. YOU owe me a new transmission.

      Also....

      >be me
      >FIL in Texas has van my parents sold them years ago. 225k miles and trans is acting weird.
      >me: trans is fricked.abort abort
      >Mexican mechanic: Nothing wrong with this transmission, changed fluid/filter.
      >Grandson (who could frick up an anvil) is still driving it at 275k miles.

  11. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    several years ago my transmission was shifting hard and doing this weird thing where the revs would fluctuate for a few seconds right before a shift while cold. I didn't know what to do besides drain and fill the ATF and it miraculously fixed the issue. it started happening again every once in a while this winter but now that it's warm it stopped. I'm sure it'll return this coming winter and I may have to drain and fill again. Not sure how many time I can keep "fixing" the issue with a drain and fill but each one seems to buy me a few more years.

    >don't flush with pressure
    >there's no such thing as 'lifetime fluid', you hear that a lot in modern transmissions
    >even if yours doesn't have a dipstick and is "sealed", you still need to change it
    >heavily research the drain and fill procedure, from shop manuals to video guides to forum posts
    >seriously read every single thing you can find about your specific transmission's fluid change process, see if you can get a diagram or something to get a better understanding of why certain steps have to happen
    >a lot of boomers will claim that friction material gets mixed in with the ATF and helps the transmission function, and replacing this fluid will accelerate wear or some shit, ignore them, it's just another old wives' tale

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      You're supposed to do several drain-and-fills in succession, anon, because each time you replace only some part of the fluid. You're effectively diluting the old fluid with new.

      • 5 days ago
        Anonymous

        That's why it used to be a 30k maintenance item even though cars would drive 100k-150k miles without being touched. If you're following a reasonable maintenance schedule there's no need to do it multiple times "in succession".

  12. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Because automatic transmissions are voodoo devil magic. Also ATF stinks. I have Nam flashbacks just thinking about the transmission jobs I've done.

  13. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    No matter how hard you try you are going to make a mess and unless you own one of those fluid pumps that do a flush, or you disconnect a line and start the vehicle, you'll still end up with old fluid in it. I think my last flush was $140.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      you are almost completely wrong, what you do is unhook one of the lines that runs the ATF through the radiator, attach extra hose running down to a marked gallon jug to catch the old fluid, and start the engine. Let it pump out 2 or 3 quarts and turn the engine off. Now remove the other ATF line to the radiator, and gravity feed the same amount of fresh fluid into the return line back to the transmission. When it's done, start the engine and run out another 2 quarts of old fluid and turn the engine off. Gravity feed the same amount of fresh fluid back. Repeat until fresh clean fluid is coming out when you run the engine, and as long as you've replaced as much as you pumped out, you have almost completely changed the fluid. Sure it mixed a little bit, but you have 95% fresh fluid now.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        oh I skipped over where you said exactly that in a lot less words:

        No matter how hard you try you are going to make a mess and unless you own one of those fluid pumps that do a flush, or you disconnect a line and start the vehicle, you'll still end up with old fluid in it. I think my last flush was $140.

        >disconnect a line and start the vehicle

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        >fluid drains out of the pan
        >the engine is running
        >transmission catches air

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          I did the method in

          https://i.imgur.com/fgqQmfX.png

          you are almost completely wrong, what you do is unhook one of the lines that runs the ATF through the radiator, attach extra hose running down to a marked gallon jug to catch the old fluid, and start the engine. Let it pump out 2 or 3 quarts and turn the engine off. Now remove the other ATF line to the radiator, and gravity feed the same amount of fresh fluid into the return line back to the transmission. When it's done, start the engine and run out another 2 quarts of old fluid and turn the engine off. Gravity feed the same amount of fresh fluid back. Repeat until fresh clean fluid is coming out when you run the engine, and as long as you've replaced as much as you pumped out, you have almost completely changed the fluid. Sure it mixed a little bit, but you have 95% fresh fluid now.

          on my old camry, didn't have any problems. Best to work out the flow rate of your troony's pump. in my case, it was about 1 litre every 15 secs. I made sure the engine oil was at operating temps prior to doing this however - lots of starting and stopping the engine involved.
          Replaced all the fluid (I think) with fresh one and it worked great

  14. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    I've only done it once on my 2017 gti. Was a pain in the ass, but should be easier the second time around. I'm supposed to do it every 40k.

    >Leave car off overnight
    >Get car on all four jackstands, as close to level as possible; can be annoying because jackstands go where the jacking points are. Ended up jacking from a part of the frame to get the last one on
    >Get under car, remove drain bolt #1, once empty, remove the second drain bolt which is in the same hole, just deeper
    >Pop hood, remove airbox, remove battery tray. Super annoying the first time, there were some special zip ties which I couldn't get off and ended up just cutting. Last screw for the battery tray was super inaccessible with my tools
    >Replace DSG (transmission) fluid filter
    >Add battery tray and airbox back
    >Replace deeper drain plug
    >Use picrel to gravity feed new oil back into the DSG from the same hole it was drained from. One side screws into drain hole, other gets screwed into the fluid bottles which are the size of half gallon jugs
    >There are five bottles and it takes forever. Puncture the bottle so that it feeds faster
    >Once all fluid is in, unscrew gravity feed tool and screw the drain plug back in as fast as you can
    >Start car and idle it until it reaches a certain temperature range. Need specialized OBDeleven. Cycle through all gears multiple times while waiting
    >Once in the temp range, remove drain plug #1 again. Let it drain until at a steady drip
    >Finally replace drain plug #1 again for the last time with a new washer
    Voila. 3.5/10 experience the first time. Fricking hated that b***h ass zip tie which I ended up just cutting off. Will probably be a 7/10 experience next time I do it. Will know what I'm doing next time around, and also have wheel cribs instead of jackstands

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Did the same recently but instead of jacking it up I used my 2t jack to wiggle the whole car without 1 front wheel on to get the fluid out. My driveway is slightly inclined so that helped to get it somewhat level.
      Used the same hose as you and drilled holes in the bottles but applied some pressured air through the hole and the fluid went in quicker than the shit off a shovel.
      To drain the fluid I just found a flat place on the street. Managed to fit my wrench just about without jacking up the car under the sump bolt. Dumped some oil on the ground before I could get the pan under the stream. 2.5l or so came out and that's that.
      What a simple job...

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        No transmission fluid filter? What car

        What is "specialized obd eleven" ? If you mean the credit thing that is meant for morons then sure otherwise you can do same thing with obd eleven but need to go into the menus or use VCDS.
        All "modern" cars are cancerous like that. Have to use VCDS if i want to change rear breaks because e brake gets in the way.

        I just meant regular obd eleven, which is specialized because it's only for VW products. Tried using a cheap obd2 scanner but it didn't have trans fluid temp available. I didn't use credits, but it's 5x more expensive for just the device

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          Because cheapo shit like elm327 only read DTC-s and delete them. They don't have supported protocols to do measuring, long coding etc etc. Their 2nd gen thing has more brands supported.

          • 5 days ago
            Anonymous

            I used (legit not knockoff) elm327s and they read fancy stuff like Prius' HV systems just fine. Elm327 chips work fine stop buying the $5 chink shit that flooded amazon. The real ones are now $20-25 I think.

            On the contrary, an expensive unit like the MXLink I currently have cannot fully access Stellantis ECUs without a LOT of frickery because some car makers physically wire their bus protocols in moronic ways.
            My car has an oil temp and pressure sensor, has transmission in, out, pressure, and solenoid time sensors but I can't read them. I would have to pay for that AlfaODB app ($50 gtfo) and either bridge the port a certain way or use those special adapter harnesses to be able to read/do certain things.

        • 5 days ago
          Anonymous

          >No transmission fluid filter? What car
          Forgot to mention, yes. The hardest part of the job was getting to the filter, but took no longer than 30 mins.
          Golf mk7 2.0tdi. It's a 6 speed wet clutch unit.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      What is "specialized obd eleven" ? If you mean the credit thing that is meant for morons then sure otherwise you can do same thing with obd eleven but need to go into the menus or use VCDS.
      All "modern" cars are cancerous like that. Have to use VCDS if i want to change rear breaks because e brake gets in the way.

  15. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    My 5th Gen 4runner has magnets in the pan that periodically need cleaning.

  16. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Modern transmissions use lifetime fluids so they don't need changes. It's not the 00's, boomer.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >lifetime fluids
      Yeah go look up how that's working out moron.

  17. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Unrelated, is it fine if I change my troony filter but not the filter seal? I put some pressure on the old seal with a screwdriver and there's no way it is coming out without me scratching the walls around it

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      No, it's going to leak pressure between the filter and the seal and cause odd shifting behavior. or the filter will just fall the frick out if the seal is what holds the filter in place.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        It's been a few weeks since I did it. Tightened the valve body bolts and shifts are still super crisp. Also I don't think there's enough clearance between the filter and pan for it to fall all the way out, but it didn't take much force to get the old filter out and the new filter didn't seem to be any more loose in there.

    • 5 days ago
      Anonymous

      >there's no way it is coming out without me scratching the walls around it
      That means it's ruined and you need to replace it.

  18. 6 days ago
    OP

    Holyshit this thread just proved my point

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      The answer is because transmissions are complicated and most people on the internet aren't mechanical engineers who specialize in tribology, so of course they wouldn't know what the frick they are talking about, does that answer your question moron?

      • 6 days ago
        OP

        You aint jimmy neutron homie calm down

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      i dont change the troony fluid because it is shifting just fine

      and i really REALLY dont want to take the pan off and find metal tidbits inside

  19. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    >change mtf once a year
    >change mtf more often if trans feels grindy
    >crush washer optional
    wowee what else is there to know

  20. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    You only get one opportunity to enjoy your life. Why keep a car with an automatic transmission for more than 100k miles?
    Frick it and chuck it.

  21. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Just do a service that includes the oil+filter and stop overthinking it.
    Thinking that doing it on an 120k mile troony that has never been opened up will damage it is nothing but a boomer tale.

  22. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    It's a whole different state of mind:

    >Do I pay for someone to do this for me

    >Do I do it myself to save time and money

    The latter is the redneck state of mind.

    Sometimes you have no other choice.

  23. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    What is there to know? Drop the pan, remove old filter, install new filter, install old pan, fill with new fluid. That's how it works.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *