Why is 7K bad for a car but fine for a hard drive?

Why is 7K bad for a car but fine for a hard drive?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >7k
    Lame.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My HGST HDDs run at 12k

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    depends on a car. The rotary engine is fine up to 10k.
    non-meme answer, it's because of inertia for the engine and reading arm frequency on HDD.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My car's good to 8.2k

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    depends on the car

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's not bad for the car, it just accelerates slower at 7k than it would at 6k.
    The highest acceleration happens at the start of the redline, before AND after that it's actually slower.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >she assumes spark ignition engine
      cute

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Depends on the car. My engine doesn't even shift to its performance cams until >6k RPM

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/gsWRDai.png

      Why is 7K bad for a car but fine for a hard drive?

      >city roads are racing tracks
      go back to gta v, kids
      real men use CVT

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    When will we get solid state cars?

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >tfw no internal combustion hard disk drive

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >anon opens his torrent client
      *brbrbrrbrvvvvrrVROOOOOOOOOOOOMMMM*
      >give it a gentle rev since it's a cold start
      >first gear, starts his paused downloads
      >vrOOoooOOoom, second
      >exhaust gases in his basement make him dizzy, but he doesn't care, his old girl is vrooming good
      >vroooooom, third gear. r/w speeds are now optimal for a nice write sesh
      >suddenly his table starts shaking like crazy, hdd seems to be misfiring for some reason
      >check his dash, oil pressure hits 3psi
      >FRICK FRICK FRICK NO
      >but it's too late, the rattles get louder, piston heads hitting valves
      >yheeeeeeeeeeennnrrrrrrrrrrr *puff*, the ol' chevvy v8 HDD his father left for him finally gave up and all his data is now gone

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    IST DER MOTOR KALT GIB IHM SECHS-EINHALB

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >German
      Gas yourself homie

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >German
      love yourself, homie

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      non-language

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Rotary HDDs when?
    How do i bypass my HDD EGR DA?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >tfw have to replace the apex seals in my HDD again

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    HDD: 5400-15000rpm near constant (excluding shutdowns) rotational velocity. Hardly any force on the bearings other than the dead weight of the platters. Minimal thermal stresses.
    ICE: 800-7000+rpm highly variable rotational velocity. Depending on throttle input highly variable forces due to combustion. Multiple points of wear (main bearings, rod bearings, piston bore, valves, cams...). Thermal stresses again highly variable, engine clearances designed for a specific temperature.

    >y 7k good for hard drive but bad for car?

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nobody cares about your cars

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >why are 4 reciprocating valves causing 7k explosions per minute bad but only a spinning disc fine
    gee I dunno anon

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      theyre not

      moron

      HDD: 5400-15000rpm near constant (excluding shutdowns) rotational velocity. Hardly any force on the bearings other than the dead weight of the platters. Minimal thermal stresses.
      ICE: 800-7000+rpm highly variable rotational velocity. Depending on throttle input highly variable forces due to combustion. Multiple points of wear (main bearings, rod bearings, piston bore, valves, cams...). Thermal stresses again highly variable, engine clearances designed for a specific temperature.

      >y 7k good for hard drive but bad for car?

      you can make a car that hits 12k easily it's just it won't be good because you have to lower compression and travel or whatever it was called
      12k for race cars is nothing

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        True, 12k+ is relatively easily achievable. One way of doing that is by "oversquaring" the stroke-to-bore ratio (what you were referring to). Other ways include reducing displacement, reducing rotating mass etc. Doing so will make for a good race engine, but it'll ruin its daily driving characteristics among other things (for one: the power band would be pushed up ridiculously high in the rev range, consequently torque at the low end would be abysmal).
        Anyway, I compared it to more standard ICEs, because OP did so.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        i mean 12k is common on motorbikes, my 125 has the injection cut jsut bellow that, the carb model was able to get to 14k or something like that, but you would have big overheating problems

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          MC22 gang

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            those are really cool man

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I have one, but it need a bit of work to get on the road. summer is coming

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Valve Float
    2. Hard drives have bearings that are designed to run at 7,000rpm and do not experience dynamic loads (the drives don't move, generally). Car engines are constantly moving and experiencing g-forces that slosh oil around and the engine requires lubrication in order to function.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A few platters with the same center of gravity on a single electric motor spindle is well balanced, a bunch of explosions happening across multiple cylinders, often with tolerances and sometimes not even good balance (odd number of cylinders) is a recipe for disaster.

    Imagine a linear push vs punching something multiple times quickly to push it.

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why is 7K bad for a car but fine for a hard drive?
    Because car pistons are many orders of magnitude larger then drive heads the fly over the spinning rust. Pistons actually touch their cylinders. Drive heads don't touch the drive surface.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Pistons actually touch their cylinders.
      i dont think they do buddy

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        you're burning oil?

  17. 2 weeks ago
    GPT Explains

    >Explain primary and secondary forces in an internal combustion engine but for morons on DA
    Certainly! Let’s break it down for our DA friends:
    Primary Forces:
    These are the main forces generated by the engine components during operation.
    Imagine a piston moving up and down inside a cylinder. As it moves, it generates torque at the crankshaft. This torque is essential for making the engine work.
    So, primary forces are all about creating that rotational motion (torque) at the crankshaft.
    Secondary Forces:
    These are the extra movements that happen due to various factors:
    Connecting Rod Movement: The connecting rod (that connects the piston to the crankshaft) moves back and forth. This motion adds some complexity.
    Clearance Between Piston and Cylinder: There’s a tiny gap between the piston and the cylinder wall. As the piston moves, it encounters this gap, causing additional forces.
    These secondary forces don’t directly create torque but can affect engine balance and vibration.
    Remember, engines are like a chaotic dance of parts—some twirl gracefully (primary forces), while others do a funky jig (secondary forces). And together, they keep our cars running!

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Explain for dummies why there forces are worse for engine wear at higher rpms than lower rpms
      Certainly! Let’s dive into why these forces impact engine wear more at higher RPMs:
      Primary Forces:
      At higher RPMs (revolutions per minute), the piston moves faster. This rapid motion increases the force exerted on engine components.
      The faster the piston accelerates and decelerates, the more stress it puts on the connecting rod, crankshaft, and bearings.
      Think of it like a merry-go-round: If you spin it slowly, it’s gentle; but crank up the speed, and things get wild!
      Secondary Forces:
      Clearance between the piston and cylinder wall becomes critical. At high RPMs, the piston slams into the cylinder walls with greater force.
      These impacts can lead to scuffing, wear, and even piston ring damage.
      Imagine a boxer throwing punches—fast jabs cause more wear than slow ones!
      In summary, higher RPMs mean more intense forces acting on engine parts, accelerating wear and tear. So, rev responsibly!

      Kys GPTard
      nobody will read this shit
      frick off with your slop back to Quora

  18. 2 weeks ago
    GPT Explains

    >Explain for dummies why there forces are worse for engine wear at higher rpms than lower rpms
    Certainly! Let’s dive into why these forces impact engine wear more at higher RPMs:
    Primary Forces:
    At higher RPMs (revolutions per minute), the piston moves faster. This rapid motion increases the force exerted on engine components.
    The faster the piston accelerates and decelerates, the more stress it puts on the connecting rod, crankshaft, and bearings.
    Think of it like a merry-go-round: If you spin it slowly, it’s gentle; but crank up the speed, and things get wild!
    Secondary Forces:
    Clearance between the piston and cylinder wall becomes critical. At high RPMs, the piston slams into the cylinder walls with greater force.
    These impacts can lead to scuffing, wear, and even piston ring damage.
    Imagine a boxer throwing punches—fast jabs cause more wear than slow ones!
    In summary, higher RPMs mean more intense forces acting on engine parts, accelerating wear and tear. So, rev responsibly!

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A hhd is round so its perfectly balanced at any speed.
    An engine is weird shaped so it vibrates

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    turbos can spin up to 200,000 rpm, nothing personal kid

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    maximum torque does not happen at maximum speed

  22. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    IDK but cars are old tech. Imagine having moving parts with friction brah. Free energy through alternate dimensions already exists. How you think those ayy homies get around millions of lightyears instantly in their perceived time in their relative space?

    We live in a very special time as humans.

    We are past the industrial age, We are pasted the old age, We are in the tech age which is exponentional with AI coming. The next 20 years are gonna be spicy, but I think you already knew that. Everyone knows it, you can almost feel it every single day. We are all waiting for IT.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >We are all waiting for IT.
      Hello. IT. Have you tried turning it off and on again?

  23. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Your hard drive doesn't internally combust (ideally)

  24. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cars usually don't reach the red zone

  25. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's not bad for my Honda accord, the redline is 7100 and it's a detuned k24 that in the civic si goes up to 8k rpm

  26. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it’s all about friction

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