Why is car repair gated by such high entry costs?

Why is car repair gated by such high entry costs? Every part seems to require a special tool/socket/screw even if the fix itself is simple until you find out that it costs $100+ in tools to even attempt it. Might as well go to the local mechanic at that point.

What are some basic b***h tools to get started with maintaining your own car? Even a floor jack is $100+

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Might as well go to the local mechanic at that point.
    This is exactly how they design modern cars, to be difficult to self-service so you have to take them into a mechanic. They're hoping you take them into the brand's service shop where you bought the car, which most normies do, and pay their exorbitant service costs.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >pay their exorbitant service costs.
      Exorbitant enough to service yourself

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nah bullshit your average normie would have no clue how to fix a 60 car.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    a lift and a garage
    everything else is cope
    >aksully i swapped an engine while on line at a mcdonald's drive-thru during a blizzard once blah blah
    didn't ask don't care

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >a lift and a garage
      That will be $10000 and a tip please.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Closer to $30k if you're starting from bare ground and want a garage that can handle a lift.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    3 ton jack, wheel ramps or jack stands, a socket set, wrenches that are SAE and metric.
    You can get sets of the different bits like Phillips or torx on the cheap.
    A 1/4" impact is perfect for most things to do on your car.
    And always have a 10mm socket handy.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You buy the tools once. But no only eurocuck cars require special tools for every part.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >$35 cheap jack
    >$30 for two jack stands
    >$220 craftsman tool set
    >some carboard to lie on (free)
    $300 for tools that will last you for life and handle 90% of repairs. Have you seen how much they charge for a brake job? You'll make your money back in one service.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >>$35 cheap jack
      >>$30 for two jack stands
      do you really want to cheap out on this though?

      • 2 months ago
        Bepis

        The cheap jacks are a pain, but the trolley jacks can work. $30-$40 is about average for a pair of 3T stands and they’re mostly all about the same Chinese crap. Find a coupon for HF and get the double locking Daytonas for like $30.

        I would drop ~$120 on a regular 3T low profile jack though because the cheap trolley jacks are so annoying. Or get the cheap jack for the first couple jobs and then do brakes for your friend and take the money and get the real jack, and the little trolley jack will be nice for when you need to do motor mounts or something.

        [...]

        >inb4 anon says “but my 1/4” impact driver will remove freshly torqued 80lb lug nuts!”

        And you don’t need an impact right away, although they make a few jobs way easier. I shill a 1/4” impact driver for small stuff (plus the drill+impact kits aren’t much more than a drill alone) and a 1/2” mid torque.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It has its role as starter equipment so long as the jackstands are safe. When I was 16 I had one of those cute little hydraulic floor jacks. Should also be stacking 2 wheels under the car with questionable jackstands for backup safety.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I try to buy everything used but good quality.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Don't cry avout costs if you have so much fear, gayhit. Even cheap chinesium, jack and proper jack stands will not kill you

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That Craftsman kit sounds like a good idea. You can do brake pads, battery, oil, etc on a Honda with that.

      I used to lift the car on the factory scissor jack and lower it into a jackstand, one wheel at a time.

      Problem is that you need a caliper retraction tool, which you can rent from AutoZone.

      Honestly, mechanics does have a high barrier of entry and is kind of a waste of time. It's only fast when you have experience and a bunch of shit laying around.

      Was doing brakes, didn't think about silicon anti-squeel shit, didn't think about power tools, didn't think about ATE Blu for bleeding, didn't think about bleeding because speed bleeders, didn't think about liquid wrench (didn't need it because worked on car previously anyway), didn't think brake cleaner, gloves, etc because it's all there already.

      When you are starting out, you really have to be organized.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >you need a caliper retraction tool
        never used one of those

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Some calipers need a borg cube-looking thing to key into slots and turn the piston but they're only $8 or so.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            An adjustable wrench or a pair of needle nose pliers will do the job in a pinch.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >borg cube-looking thing

            I have that! Of course it doesn’t work on my rear corkscrew calipers so I gotta use a flat screwdriver instead.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/D6pgzBC.jpg

          >you find out that it costs $100+ in tools
          No it doesn't, you are watching youtubers who sell tools do it.
          My daily can be taken apart with a 8-24 socket set.
          You already have a jack, it came with your car.
          You need a set of jackstands which are around $30.

          This
          homies cooking up all sort of stuff you don't need to start. First tool was a 20$ walmart wrench set.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Capitalism; if flat rate and making you buy your own shit didn't profit them, they wouldn't do it.
    Imagine if each deli and pizza worker had to buy their own Lexcans, frickin lol

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I read that as Lexcens, which is a Holden commodore rebadge from the 90s. My first thought was "where do you live that pizza delivery drivers all have Toyota Lexcens provided as work cars?" That shit sounds amazing.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Dunno, but I wanna go there.
        Nah, Lexans are basically plastic food bins

  7. 2 months ago
    Bepis

    It’s not. You can get a socket set, jack, and stands for <$500. Add in brake pads and rotors and it’s about the same money as getting new pads and rotors at your average shop, but you get tools and experience out of it.

    And eventually you can use those tools and knowledge to make some side money on the weekend and buy more tools to make the next job easier.

  8. 2 months ago
    Bepis

    [...]

    >unused*
    Pic related is what power tool plastic looks like after one job inside a dirty engine bay.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      one reason i splurged for the rubber cover/condom for my impact

      • 2 months ago
        Bepis

        Pretty sure those were made so you don’t scratch/dent the cars your working on. That’s why they’re sold for the ratchets and they only really cover the metal head of the thing which won’t get dirty anyway.

        They’re tools. A lot of the grease wipes off, they’re going to get tossed around on the ground as you’re working. Who cares if they get dirty? The real collectors who don’t use the stuff are going to buy the new model as soon as it drops in 30 months.

        >tfw I got this right angle impact and haven’t had a good job to break it out on
        I think that may be another thing people want more than they need so they buy em.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I don't take care of any of my tools, so anyone that cleans their tools after using them doesn't actually use them!

  9. 2 months ago
    Bepis

    [...]

    Yup, doing actual work can be difficult and dirty.

    >>$35 cheap jack
    >>$30 for two jack stands
    do you really want to cheap out on this though?

    This weekend HF had the double locking jacks for $35/pair plus the Pitt low profile 3T rapid pump jack for $120. I hate shilling HF, but the prices are tough to beat when they have coupons and the wrenches and some tools are pretty cheap if you can’t wait for Amazon next day delivery.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This. The new HF jack stands are actually pretty based and safe. triple locking, strong pawl. They test really well. I feel confident under my HF 3 tons.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >you find out that it costs $100+ in tools
    No it doesn't, you are watching youtubers who sell tools do it.
    My daily can be taken apart with a 8-24 socket set.
    You already have a jack, it came with your car.
    You need a set of jackstands which are around $30.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >My daily can be taken apart with a 8-24 socket set.
      what car?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        1999 vw jetta

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >VW not requiring torx or triple square
          >VW not requiring random bullshit proprietary tools for basic tasks
          I know you're talking about a mk4, but I find it pretty hard to believe

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            a set of torx nuts is like 20 bucks

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >can be done with only a basic metric socket set
            >actually you need these too
            yeah no shit. I was in disbelief that a VAG product could be dealt with while only using basic metric sockets, not that it costs an arm and a leg for a few specialist sets

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Pretty much any one built in last 20 years.
        They globohomosexual standardized on the measurement system Chinks took from Germans.

        There’s a point where you start doing enough work that the tools make sense though. The scissor jack, you can use it, but how many times are you going to waste 30min+ lifting the car before you spend $120 on a proper 3T jack? And you can do a ton with a basic socket set, but you’re going to removing lots of extra parts on certain jobs without a long extension or flex head wrench or some specialty pliers like the remote hose clamp pliers.

        But yeah, the cost of entry overall is low, especially when considering what shops cost for routine jobs.

        Oh I agree, but if OP is a poorgay who wants to try changing oil for first time, scissor and a wrench will do fine.
        To me casual wrenching is relaxing and I actually enjoy this, it's like one if those 3d puzzles, except you are pulling a greasy alternator through a swingarm and wondering how Cheng did this in the factory.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Previous gen F150s can pretty much be parted out with 5 sockets...8mm, 10mm, 13mm, 24mm, and 27mm.

    • 2 months ago
      Bepis

      There’s a point where you start doing enough work that the tools make sense though. The scissor jack, you can use it, but how many times are you going to waste 30min+ lifting the car before you spend $120 on a proper 3T jack? And you can do a ton with a basic socket set, but you’re going to removing lots of extra parts on certain jobs without a long extension or flex head wrench or some specialty pliers like the remote hose clamp pliers.

      But yeah, the cost of entry overall is low, especially when considering what shops cost for routine jobs.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Technically you can skip the jack stands too and just use wood cribbing. A socket set is pretty much the only 'must buy' for minor maintenance.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >What are some basic b***h tools to get started with maintaining your own car?
    Should probably start by defining what jobs are really worth diy. Obv doing a troony rebuild isn't worth it on your own.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Maybe for you, but to someone who is just getting into it and buying tools etc, it's probably best to let someone else do it.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Have you ever tried not being a manlet? I’m 6’3” and have no issues getting tools and parts. Seems like only you're struggling, pipsqueak

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    1/4" is great to work on your vehicle.
    1/2" is for big jobs. I have a 1/2" impact but the smaller impact is just way more handy to do general maintenance.
    The small impact can do lugs easily.
    Wouldn't trust it to do a crush washer on the rear end of my truck though.
    It is best to have both sae and metric.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >gatekeeping meeeee
    You kids are such gay little pussies now

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    yes you need hundreds of dollars of tools once you go down the slippery slope.
    in any case every man SHOULD have tools.
    most guys start out with their dads tools until they amass enough of their own
    what the frick are you doing not own any tools at all?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >what the frick are you doing not own any tools at all?
      spotted the kid with rich parents
      most people dont even handle a stable place to store tools, let alone own them in the first place

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        If only there was a safe place to store my car tools

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          try storing a 3T jack in there

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            It would suck to have an extra 100lbs in the back plus all the toom but it will easily fit in a sedan trunk.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            What do I win

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            anon's bus pass
            maybe you can use it if you should ever find all your cars being jack stand queens at miraculously identical times

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >1/2 space taken up by tools
            >cant do shopping anymore

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You don't have a passanger seat? Or back seats? I haven't used my trunk from groceries ever. Most recent use was a transfer case. Beer goes on passanger floor. If I got beer groceries sometimes go in back seat but normally just passanger seat and floor.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Imagine buying a vehicle with so little cargo space you can't fit both basic tools and groceries at the same time.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            A 3T bottle jack is tiny. Floor jacks are for garages, poorgays don't have those.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I was racing on track with this shit in the trunk.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's what my little brother does. He's still a renter so. He doesn't work on cars that's my thing but he's got basically a whole dam wood shop in the back of his pilot, which crosses over enough so he changes his own battery and oil.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >dont even handle a stable place to store tools
        Anon where are you from? You used USD which assumes American, but most Americans can afford a home without having a rich daddy. Are you Somali?

        try storing a 3T jack in there

        How did you get it home from the store?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Sorry you're a loser anon, but don't you give up. If I can make it, you can make it.

      • 2 months ago
        Bepis

        I started owning tools and learning how to fix shit because I grew up with a single mom who couldn’t afford to call a plumber or mechanic for every little issue. Quite the opposite of what you envision.

        https://i.imgur.com/NjShaJi.jpg

        [...]
        Thanks guys. I'm asking because everyone says this type of jack should be able to move freely while lifting. Which is kind of understandable because the lifting point moves horizontally along the jack chassis.

        It can be sketchy if they don’t roll. But all you need is a piece of scrap plywood that’s like the footprint of the jack with another maybe 6”-12” on the front so the jack can roll forward a little as you lift.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Plywood is based conformal jacking assist also good for lifting other machinery.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I am able to maintain my 2001 Silverado with a basic tool set, they made them so easy to work on and reliable. It has almost 300k miles. I really probably will never have to buy another vehicle unless gas is no longer available.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This but a damn 5.3 Silverado is basically 50k.... 2500 money

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Are there any other cars/trucks like this made recently? Is Honda stuff from the 2010s like this?

      • 2 months ago
        Bepis

        The best bet is getting some base model shitbox or like a fleet van with no options, and something real common so you can find used and/or aftermarket parts easily and cheaply. Also the common issues will have tons of info online so you can fix stuff faster. Naturally aspirated is probably a plus.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Honestly dude, you sound like you just came here for us to validate you in being a wrenchlet. To tell you its expensive and hard.
    Continue being a homosexual if you will, here's a board for you >>/n/
    Or just buy a cheap chink metric wrench set and start working.
    Either way, says a lot about you.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There is hardly any gate keeping in automotive tools. Pick a job to be done on your car, buy or rent the tools specific to that job. Rinse and repeat. Eventually over the years you'll have a ton of tools and saved stacks of cash.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A 100 bucks in tools aint shit dude.
    Thats a wrench and socket set, screwdrivers and various pliers but you can do most things on a car with just that.
    Your bus pass probably cost 40 bucks a week.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >filtered by having to buy HF shit

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Even if you are starting with zero tools most jobs are cheaper to do yourself.

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    When I dont have the fitting tool for a job I just smash the bolt apart and tape/glue it together afterwards.
    Aslong as its not a vital component or anything with high pressure fluids thats usually 100% fine.
    There are more then enough nuts and bolts anyways, fricking a few up doesnt cause any issues long run.

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    most simple stuff can be done with simple tools. brakes, radiator hoses, valve cover gaskets. pretty much anything on the surface is doable with tools you use to do oil changes with.
    it's when we start peeling back the onion, head gaskets, clutches, ball joints, piston rings that the bill starts to get expensive.
    got composite head gasket residue stuck on your block that won't come off even with razor blades? You'll need a 3M rolec bristle disc (White) and an angle die grinder to get that off before you scratch the aluminum anymore with those razors. You'll also need air compressor to run the die grinder.
    You got some weird intermittent wiring issue with a cam sensor? well that basic multimeter isn't going to cut it now you need an oscilloscope. (or you can just cut the wires off at the ecu and sensor and run that house wiring you've held onto through the firewall and hope that fixes the issue)
    once you have these specialty tools you'll be prepared if it ever comes up again, but the entry price is ridiculous and it seems like it's one thing after another. it really adds up.
    oh... and if you're an autistic moron like me with horrible memory issues and you keep losing sockets and wrenches. you have to buy new ones every month or so if you do a lot of work. i either drop them into the engine bay somewhere, lose them in gravel, or just outright put them somewhere i'll never remember.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      > got composite head gasket residue stuck on your block that won't come off even with razor blades? You'll need a 3M rolec bristle disc (White) and an angle die grinder to get that off before you scratch the aluminum anymore with those razors

      Nonsense.

      https://www.harborfreight.com/2-in-surface-conditioning-kit-11-piece-60753.html

      Stick it in a screwgun and take it slow.
      The brown ones work real good for cleaning on cast iron surface, the blue on aluminum.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        legend says that the blue one has the potential to create low spots in aluminum. Subaru of America has a TSB saying to only use non-woven abrasives, like the white rolec disc, to clean block surfaces.
        Now, i'm not sure if it's from idiots putting their whole body into it, or if it'll actually just eat up the surface.
        If you've actually used it on aluminum please share your experience and which engine it was for.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          The only real experience i had with the blue ones is they suck at cleaning cast iron. Cleaned my aluminum intake gasket surface just fine.

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    modern car problems, I never needed a special tool that I couldn't build myself from wood and threaded rods

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Oh, a tool thread, very nice.

    [...]

    A 3T bottle jack is tiny. Floor jacks are for garages, poorgays don't have those.

    I'm thinking about buying one. Can these be used on rough surfaces like stone floors?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i use mine on gravel and snow so yeah you can use a floor jack on bad terrain

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I use my 3ton floor jack one dirt/mud all the time to help guys get their campers levelled. I keep a piece of 3/4" plywood at camp to throw on the ground for the jack to sit on.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          i use mine on gravel and snow so yeah you can use a floor jack on bad terrain

          Thanks guys. I'm asking because everyone says this type of jack should be able to move freely while lifting. Which is kind of understandable because the lifting point moves horizontally along the jack chassis.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you ever have to lift a car from the front subframe and that car is leaking oil onto said subframe, make sure the jack isn't slipping on the oil as you pump it up.
            I only needed to make that mistake once. -_-

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Good point. My car is leaking oil, and the front subframe definitely has oil stains on it.
            How did it end for you?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Just about got the wheels off the ground and the jack slid backwards, dropping onto the steering rack. Quickly released it back down to the ground and *somehow* nothing was damaged, but that was the first time I had a car fall off a jack, and it frit the fricking life out of me.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Proper jack placement captures the jacking point such that oil is irrelevant because jacks are not designed to rely on friction.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The bottom of the subframe (The OEM lifting location) is completely flat, and my jack had a rubber puck that helped grip the metal on previous liftings. Obviously has the opposite effect when oily.

    • 2 months ago
      Bepis

      Toss a piece of plywood down. Floor jacks are supposed to roll slightly as you’re lifting the car. As the arm/pad goes up, the base of the jack rolls forward a bit

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    They're no where near that heavy, just somewhat awkward to lift makes them seem heavy.

  28. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's another I want to be able to do thing myself but I refuse to take steps toward that goal or make any sacrifices whatsoever thread.

  29. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What's yalls DApinion on these? I can't fit a full lift in my garage and they seem better than fricking with jacks/stands

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Don't do it. Its super involved and expensive, and they're less forgiving for frickups than actual jacks. If you don't align them perfectly (EXACTLY the same distance part start and end, exact same location under car) they will cave in or go on angles and not be safe. Get a set of ramps to do most things that don't require the wheels to come off, and just use more than 4 jacks if you need the car up on 4 jacks. You'll save more money and be safer. That shit is quite literally a meme.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        heh, last time i asked about it an anon said it was quite useful. go figure...

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I have no experience with that style but this style worked good for me at my dad's shop. We used it when the regular 2 post had a big job stuck on it. Doesn't cover all bases like obviously remove troony. Some exhausts might be doable wouldn't count on it though. Also wasn't the brand in pic just first one that came up on google. It might call it mobile but it takes some ass to move. It will move okay, but don't plan for a spot you'll have to move it often it's no fun.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Looked at these, then decided if I was to go that far, I'd be better off getting one of those half height Maxxjaxx lifts.

  30. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Dam, I'd still say that's not close imo but opinions are buttholes and I would have guessed like 80. I'm big dumb. Big dumb but stronger than I thought.

  31. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    moto bvlls can’t stop winning

  32. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Even a floor jack is $100+

    Doesn't have to be, but would you want to get under it?

  33. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I changed the clutch on my Fabia 1 winter beater with common tools and wood, I'm not a mechanic and it still only took me a day. That day I decided to keep this sacred shitbox until I fall over dead.

  34. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get cheap tools from Harbor freight or from aliexpress.

  35. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The tools you buy pay for themselves when you do your own repairs.

  36. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's an investment that will pay for itself lol.

  37. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    protip dont do any maintenance yourself except for brake pads, oil and filter change, air filter change, tire rotations, light bulb changes, fuses, spark plugs, and top of the engine stuff

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >can't(won't) service suspension and driveline components
      pleb

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        have fun learning an entire trade and purchasing an entire toolset to do one job for yourself, not to mention laying under your 2,000lbs+ car, fricking up your back and knees and hoping that you dont accidentally kick one of the jack stands

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >learning entire trade to swap coil springs or replace a control arm
          other than some jobs taking time, or needing a press, lots of shit can be done fairly easily
          >frick up your back
          oh no is the hard concrete just too much for your precious spine

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          NTA, but replacing broken shocks was easy, servicing some driveline components like greasing joints and drain-filling fluids in the transfer case and the diffs was as easy as it can get too, all of this didn't even require lifting the almost 3 ton truck.
          >2,000lbs+ car
          >unusually lightweight car
          >probably a small roadster or some other enthusiast and/or classic vehicle
          >nonono you can't DIY
          >you won't have fun
          I seriously hope you meant something else.

          protip dont do any maintenance yourself except for brake pads, oil and filter change, air filter change, tire rotations, light bulb changes, fuses, spark plugs, and top of the engine stuff

          Do oil changes yourself, but delegate other fluids to someone else? Kind of moronic, because the oil changes are rather frequent and have a potential to be very messy, while every other fluid job is infrequent enough for the anon to care about the mess and is harder to verify for correctness (no dipsticks) if someone else is doing it.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Stay pleb

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          i don't know about entire trade but it definitely has been fun learning about it

          • 2 months ago
            Bepis

            +1 on this. It’s frustrating when shit breaks and you’re tired but have to get it fixed. But I like learning how the stuff works. I also have a bit of a collector ‘tism in my DNA so I enjoy when some of the tools I thought were sort of a waste of money are actually getting used.

            >tfw that unused extractor socket actually works
            My 19.5mm swollen nutz socket also came in handy the other day.

  38. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >$50 socket set
    >high entry cost
    Chances are you'll save enough money on the first job not going to a mechanic to make up for all the tools you had to buy.

  39. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    harbor freight sells a socket set with 85% of anything your average weekend mechanic needs for $50. for $100 I haven't gone to buy a new tool in probably 10 years

  40. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Specialty tools have always been a thing. On old cars you can get away with mostly sockets, wrenches, a jack and stands, etc. But even with old cars you might find yourself needing a whole assortment of pullers, presses, spring compressors, timing lights etc etc. The reality is that any shop is going to have these things and for most people who aren't doing it professionally, it's cheaper to bring it in once or twice than buy the tools and do it yourself. Tools are expensive, always have been and always will be, it's not just because of manufacturer bullshit. Do yourself a favor and look at estate sales for dead boomers, that's the cheapest way to get tools.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      the estate sale secret is out and has been out for a long time thanks to the internet
      it's just like how craigslist etc. used to have actual deals until they went mainstream, now people want 5%-10% under original MSRP for anything in any condition

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Depends on who's running the estate sale and region I think. Still plenty of good deals in rural areas of the Midwest but you're not going to find them advertised online.

  41. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why is car repair gated by such high entry costs?

    It isn't. Tool prices are cheap compared to savings from doing your own work.

    BTW old rims are far more stable than jack stands and don't even require pavement. I use rims and wooden cribbing (cut up 4x4 and some 6x6 because I have trucks) and gave away my jackstands long ago.

  42. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    depends on a car, i guess. i have a set of sockets, torque wrench, and a set of spanners, it lets me change wheels, change oil, i've installed new coilovers and sway bars on curbside, tried replacing a spun rod bearing though everything around was too ruined at this point, did tons of little repairs like engine sensors, electric window winders, various interior bits, various improvements, new steering wheel, new ecu (+50eur soldering iron for this one), bucket seats. i dunno, unless you have a particularly shitty and unrepairable car or unless a basic cheap set of sockets is already not good for your budget, you're just incorrect

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The question here is, what couldn't you do with all of that?

  43. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    your car is going to break so why even repair it yourself? why fight an uphill battle

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