You know how EVs are so efficient because regen braking refills their battery, and their brake pads last forever?

You know how EVs are so efficient because regen braking refills their battery, and their brake pads last forever? Why don't we have regen braking in gas cars, where you can fill the gas tank by slowing down? Pretty simple idea.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    He's thinking too much, shut it down SHUT IT DOWN

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's called a hybrid.
    Gas cars are more-efficient at speed, EVs more efficient at stop-and-go. Hybrids combine these and often have regen braking.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Gas cars are more-efficient at speed
      More efficient than gas cars are at stop and go but not more efficient than EVs are at speed.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >but not more efficient than EVs are at speed.

        ICE cars literally have 2x the range of EV at highway speed

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sure, just put a giant tank of petroleum and fractionating still in your car.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Because oil companies don't make any money off of you creating your own gas

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >You know how EVs are so efficient because regen braking refills their battery, and their brake pads last forever?
    that's not even remotely true you fricking moron, recuperation is almost completely a meme. EV's are so heavy that they melt through brakes like they're chocolate.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      EV brakes last ten times longer than gas car brakes.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        ICE vehicles have so much efficiency and range that they don't need to bother with that queer shit. Big diesel pickups and trucks have exhaust and jake brakes that use the engines compression to slow down the vehicle and save on brake wear and heat buildup.

        It only takes a couple laps of a track to kill a Teslas brake pads. I see a frick load of them with the front rims cakes in brake dust.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >It only takes a couple laps of a track to kill a Teslas brake pads. I see a frick load of them with the front rims cakes in brake dust.
          ?? I can make a round 40 mile round trip to Costco and back without even touching the brake pads. How could ten of those wear out the brake pads?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >track driving is every day driving
          You are moronic.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Why don't we have regen braking in gas cars
      this is starting to become a thing with mild hybrid systems, you don't regenerate gas but you still regenerate electricity and can run more powerful electric systems on a 48v system, it also increases MPG since the motor gives propulsion assist

      moron alert. with regen braking the actual brake pads are rarely ever used

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      EVs weigh about as much as ICE cars.
      VW Golf VIII: 1255-1630 kg (no fuel)
      VW ID3: 1772-1934 kg
      In burger units, thats about one of you lot in difference.
      Saying that EVs are much heavier than ICEVs is just stupid. There are better arguments against EVs you can use.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        it's a 500kg difference you mong

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Golf hasn't been refreshed in a while, the ID.3 is a bigger vehicle, and VW is currently behind Tesla in battery technology.
          Where Tesla also hasn't been the market leader in production battery packs now for a while.

          We will have to see what the new electric GTI weighs, and what battery chemistry it uses.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They have regenerative braking on those giant dump trucks used in mining (modern versions).
      There's one particular mine that's on top of a mountain.
      Because the truck goes downhill loaded and returns empty, it's able to generate 100% of the electricity needed to run and never has to be charged.

      Just a niche application but pretty cool.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://arstechnica.com/cars/2017/09/this-cement-quarry-dump-truck-will-be-the-worlds-biggest-electric-vehicle/

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      lmao you are so fricking stupid. no wonder you're so poor.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      lolwut. people driving teslas often have "problems" with rusting rotors because most of the time it relies on regen braking. obviously, the solution is to simply hit the brakes hard enough to engage the actual pads and rotors.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The brake pedal in a Tesla always uses the physical brakes. The KERS engages on lifting off the accelerator, but that can be disabled.
        Porsche has the cars computer determine whether brakes or KERS gets used, although that can be changed to always use the brakes.

        The issue for these cars is on a track you currently want to disable the KERS to make managing the battery pack temperature easier, they aren't set up like the KERS system is on a F1 or FE car which is track optimized. That means using the brakes all the time, which then exposes the problem that they usually ship from the factory with brakes that aren't up to the challenge of a track which is also not uncommon.
        Tesla now sells an official track package just like other car makers like Porsche. There are third-party tuning companies like Unplugged Performance that offer their own solutions.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >You know how EVs are so efficient
    No, I don't know that EVs are so efficient.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Gas cars are more-efficient at speed
    Compared to gas cars in stop and go traffic yes. Not compared to an EV at speed.

    The issue for EVs at speed is not efficiency. Common electric cars at 100mph can still easily do more than 100mpge in most conditions. Rather the problem many EVs have today is stored energy. Common electric cars still have only the equivalent energy of 1 or 2 gallons of gasoline, which is why they often have 100 or 200 miles of real-world range. Electric SUVs often have 3 or 4 because they have more room for battery cells, but they are also less aerodynamic and heavier which means they need they extra capacity for the same range.

    High-end electric cars with the new higher capacity batteries can now have 3.5 to 4 gallon equivalent, but most car makers are more focused on 400 miles with a single 5 to 10 minute stop, instead of 400 miles of non-stop driving because that is much cheaper. A 2 gallon equivalent sodium ion battery pack costs around $5k, a 4 gallon equivalent solid state battery costs over $15k.
    Range-extender solutions like gas engines, or hydrogen fuel cells can still make sense, but probably only for niches like towing, track use, or areas with no modern infrastructure.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      When most people use the word efficiency in a colloquial context, they're talking about range per refill.
      Sometimes it's range per dollar or range per produced co2.
      Nobody cares how many miles per stored kilofarts the car is moving.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I haven't had to charge at a station in 12,000 miles so I guess EVs BTFO gas cars.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          i haven't had to think about how much it costs to fill up in 12,000 days

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Based EV user. It's nice having consistent fuel prices.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            i don't drive an ev though

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >I haven't thought about gas prices in 40 years!
            >puts "I did that" sticker on every gas pump
            Kek, you think about it so much you paid extra money for a packet of stickers to express how much money gas cost you.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            i dont put those stickers on them either

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >When most people use the word efficiency in a colloquial context, they're talking about range per refill.
        No they don't. My truck a hell of a lot farther than a Prius on a single tank, but no one is saying that it's more efficient than a Prius

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >When most people use the word efficiency in a colloquial context, they're talking about range per refill.
        you are functionally illiterate, holy shit

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why don't we have regen braking in gas cars, where you can fill the gas tank by slowing down?
    you mean you spin the engine backwards and it produces oil?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have an even better idea. Why can't don't we make cars that run on air like a living organism? No need for any oil, gas or electricity. And no emissions

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Still needs fuel, air, and water to function and emits gas emissions as well.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Living organisms don't use fuel

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          We do, it's called food

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            So throw a few eggs in the tank. My point is that living organisms don't drink gasoline to function. We live off natural products. Why don't we design cars around this concept?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >What's croozing downhill in 5th gear without pressing the gas pedal then downshifiting instead of braking when necessary
            Post bus pass

            >Turn the gas tank into a biodigestor full of fermenting food then burn the methane
            Imagine the smell, enjoy the literal fart cans and cleaning car shit

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Have you never heard of a fricking horse?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Biofuel, you mean? A lot of the corn produced in the US is used to create ethanol for vehicles.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofuel

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You certainly can power cars off natural products (see ethanol or biodiesel), but you need a lot more than a couple of eggs in the tank to get enough energy to power a vehicle; at best even the most energy dense organic materials (oils & fats) are only on par with gasoline. And plants are a grossly inefficient method of turning solar energy into stuff you can use in a car. If you took the entire American sòybean crop, and turned all the oil in those beans into biodiesel, you would would end up with roughly 6 billion gallons of fuel. In comparison, the US uses about 45 billion gallons of diesel a year. Likewise, with corn right now about 40% is turned into ethanol; that produces 15 billion gallons, which energy wise is equivalent to 10 billion or so gallons of gas. Meanwhile the US uses 130 billion gallons of gas a year. So obviously there simply are not enough crop lands to replace more than a fraction of total fuel usage.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Living organisms don't use fuel

      This has to be one of the stupidest posts I've read this year

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You have no idea of what's being discussed here you fricking moron

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah it's called a bicycle

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >you can fill the gas tank by slowing down
    PSA actually did this over a decade ago. When you slowed down, it compressed gas in a tank. The compressed gas was then used to get the car back up to speed. It was an interesting idea that could have reached production but got shelved for political reasons (both within PSA and within the EU).

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What reasons? Was it too good?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What reasons? Was it too good?

      UPS has utilized this technology in some of their step vans, only difference being that hydraulic fluid drives the wheels instead of compressed air

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Why isn’t this a standard thing? i would think it’s more efficient than converting to chemical energy and back using the battery

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I'm guessing it's added weight, cost, and mechanical complexity for not a lot of gain

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          While compressed air tanks are cheap and long lasting, they are not very power dense. A lot of energy is lost compressing air and then expanding it again to add power to the car. Furthermore, compressed air has a lot of water within it so the overall system is probably not gonna be as reliable as an electric car (same reason why air suspensions turn out to be money pits).

          The biggest advantage of the system is that you could use the compressed air to boost the engine's output temporarily like if it was running on nos, and thus save fuel by not needing as big an engine as normally, but it's easy to see why there is more potential in hybrid or pure electric cars.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Batteries don't produce energy chud, they just store it. At terrible energy to mass and volume ratios. Gas cars cutoff fuel delivery off throttle and the flywheel stores rotational energy.

    A hybrid has the advantage of regenerative braking and not being purely a BEV.
    >and their brake pads last forever
    BEVs weigh more and gas cars already have very good engine braking.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >At terrible energy to mass and volume ratios.
      4kg per kWh still isn't great, but its better than when they were 8kg per kWh 10 years ago.

      >Gas cars cutoff fuel delivery off throttle and the flywheel stores rotational energy.
      Those help a little, but gas cars still use about 68kWh of stored energy to drive 100km at 100km/hr which is the best case for them. They do even worse in stop and go traffic.
      An electric car only needs about 16kWh to do the same, and that is the worst case scenario for them, they're great in stop and go.

      >BEVs weigh more
      Not as true as it used to be, mostly because gas cars have gotten heavier while EVs have mostly stayed the same.

  12. 2 months ago
    s10fag

    wow, all this cope tech and it still can't get 300 miles to a tank with a brand new battery

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      All what tech? You get it free using a battery and an electric motor.
      600 mile range batteries are on the market now, but they're expensive, and 300 mile batteries are good enough most of the time.

      How often do you really drive 600 miles non-stop?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >and 300 mile batteries are good enough most of the time.
        Sure, if you live somewhere that it never gets below freezing.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          werks 4 me in Canada
          >noooo I drive 600 miles every day in -40 weather year round!
          And let me guess, your commute is uphill both ways too, right?

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Gas cars dont have regenerative braking.

    Hybrids do regenerate electric regardless to is it mild hybrid, full hybrid. plugin hybrid. in mild hybrid technology its often belt drive starter-generator(this completely replaces the traditional alternator)- or a small motor-generator bolted into transmission.

    >EV brake pads last forever.
    You are wrong. If you use regular brakes too rarely then brake calibers pistons will start binding, brake discs will rust out faster, brake pads friction surface will begin to glaze causing poorer braking. With cheap shit brake pads the friction part tend to detach from brake pads somewhere around 6-15 years.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If you use regular brakes too rarely then brake calibers pistons will start binding, brake discs will rust out faster, brake pads friction surface will begin to glaze causing poorer braking

      You're not that smart. Manufacturers have thought of those issues already and the friction brakes are periodically applied to keep them in working order.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    they are called hybrids.
    you could do this by specific mechanical flywheel called KERS but this unit would cost more than the rest of the car

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Toyota hybrid that sells more units than they can currently make... And that's in the face of government subsidised EV

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      And that's still less than a BEV.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Toyota made most of thier models hybrid only, you literally can't buy a gas only Camry now

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        All hybrids are gas only.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          No you moron

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Hybrids get all their energy from gas. They're gas cars.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >has an electric motor and lithium battery
            >somehow still considered gas only in your eyes
            So the technology isn't the problem then? You just want to make sure the energy is coming from our benevolent oil giants? Sounds like shill talk to me

            Guess in your eyes this i3 with an 8 gallon fuel cell is a gas car

            Frick off from DA, shill

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >>has an electric motor and lithium battery
            Which gets its energy from gas.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yup, it's a shill

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Not an argument.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          No you moron. Even Toyota does have Prius prime, Rav4 prime which are both plugin hybrids.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            That doesn't refute what I said.

            >but not more efficient than EVs are at speed.

            ICE cars literally have 2x the range of EV at highway speed

            Range is not efficiency.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    regen braking is just a tiny part of the efficiency gains. The main gain is replacing the engine which is like 30% energy efficient with a motor which is 95% energy efficient. It's why EVs mog hybrids in efficiency.

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